OCR Interpretation


The citizen. [volume] (Berea, Ky.) 1899-1958, November 24, 1910, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052076/1910-11-24/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

dEREA PUBLISHING co
INOOnloUATlml
J P FAULKNER Manager
Enleml at the Pod opke al IJlfto Ay a second
cfaa In Umattcr
THE CITIZEN
Devoted to the Interests the Mountain People
Ii R R COYLE
L
1p Sena Kentucky
THANKSGIVING
The President in bin proclamation has summarized the reasons
for the spirit of thankfulness on the part of the nation and the Gov
ernor following him has set forth the Spates debt of gratitude The
reasons given in both cases are the abundance of our crops the ab
sence of pestilence peace within our borders and the amicable re
lotions existing between our government and all foreign powers
Sullicent causes these for the outpouring of the national heart
in thanksgiving and praise but they leave untouched of necessity
the many individual calls for expressions of gratitude
Christmas and Easter our great national holiday and some
other special yearly occasions are halting places in our rapid pace
for the rebaptism and reconsecratiou O four lives by the spirit of the
day and we are always much the better by their influence if we en
tor into and partake of that spirit
But there la no better day than Jj18nksghing Day for taking
an inventory of our individual spiritim assets and liabilities In
fact wo cau notdo other than make such an inventory if we call up
on ourselves to give thanks and in mosT cases we will find that there
ia a great disparity between the blesslu s we have received mid our
deserts jJ
And by an individual spiritual inventory we mean that our
thoughts should be turned away largely from the material That
we have prospered in business and that we have experienced poll
ing calamitous are of course groat causes for rejoicing and thank
fulness but it is much more to the point if we have been enabled
to keep our spirits pure have not lost self control have not sold
ourselves to vice under whatever vicissitudes of fortune or what
ever temptations Here is the real test of our life and our worth
and if we have kept ourselves in tuna with the Great Spirit altho
great material losses may have been ours we shall not have to be
called upon to give thanks but oil r gratitude will pour forth spon
taneously But if we have failed in this respect whatever may have
been our material blessing and successes we have but little cause
for thanksgiving except that we are still spared to mend our ways
and that it is not yet too late
WHAT DOES THE EDITOR THINK ABOUT IT
In this issue will be found a letter from n mountain man now
in Delaware in reference to a recent publication in the New York
World derogatory to the mountain people Dr Frost mentions
and deprecates the same article in his letter This article within
the last week und others of a like nature within the last two or
three months have had rather wide currency in Becea and the
mountains and the editor has been asked time and again to declare
his attitude toward this continual drubbing of the mountain people
A certain young man from the mountains went to live in
Boston and attended Harvard College Oity life and New England
customs and conditiuns were now to him He took the morning
papers and was shocked and horrified daily by the accounts of the
diabolical crimes that were a part of the program of every nights
orgies in the great metropolitan district mostly crimes against
women too horrible for description He learned a new vocabulary
of crime unknown to his mountain fastnesses and his boyhood days
Contrasting these conditions with the religious atmosphere
that surrounded his childhoodthe undisturbed peace as against
the constant shock to his seiisibilitieHrilio was accosted one lily
by one of his professors who in an effort to get acquainted with his
pupil asked where he was from Quick was tho reply I was born
and raised in tho home of the Puritansthe Kentucky mountains
This is the editors answer to the scurrilous articles that issue
from the presses of the venders of slander in some of the great cen
tore of criminality Making full acknowledgement of many motes
in our eyes ho would ask that a few beams bplucked from those
of our detractors
The editor has a friend who recently traveled thru a certain
mountain district and on returning to his home wrote for some pic
tures illustrating mountain conditions to accompany an article he
was asked to prepare The pictures were sent but they were repre
sentative There were pictures of good and substantial homes as
well as the poorer there wore neat and attractive churches as well
as the uninviting there was a beautiful school house and an intelli
gent looking teacher and pupils as well as the unattractive a bad
road was pictured but n good and shady ono such as may be seen in
many mountain localities was placed alongside of it
This is what the editor thinks of illustrating mountain condi
tions Any other method is to him down right dishonesty and its
only motive mercenary
The editor has had long acquaintance with a certain school op
erating in tho mountains This school has sometimes found it
necessary to send its representatives out into the state and beyond
the state to secure funds for its bettor operation These represent
atives in making their plea for help have magnified the virtues of
the mountain people instead of their vices They have shown that
they are of good ancestry not the descendants of the white slaves
of tho tidewater section of Revolutionary times They have pro
tested that theyaro not allclay eaters and criminals but that a
small minority of the vicious have stamped their reputation upon
the whole owing to irresponsible reporters and they have plead
with their audiences to invest some of their savings in character for
their less fortunate but worthy kinsmen in the Kentucky mountains
This is what the editor thinks about the method of obtaining
money for our Mountain Schools
Several years ago the editor knew a splendid young Presbyter
ian minister one of the best men he ever met This man traveled
und preached extensively in the mountains and did much good
Naturally his education and manners were in marked contrast to
many with whom he came in contact and with eyes different for this
very reason he saw much that was ludicrous some things that were
pathetic and not a little that he thought was rather outlandish Fi
unlly this man went to Ohio and when it was learned that he had
spent several years in the Kentucky mountains he was asked to write
out his experiences for publication His reply was that those peo
ple had trusted him and loved him and to tell his experiences with
them either for sport or for gain would be to betray the trust im
posed by their hospitality and most ofall if they should hear of it
all the good he had accomplished in years would be blasted in a mo
mon t
mentAs to the attitude of those who have been taken into our homes
and trusted by us this is what the editor thinks and if they fail to
come up to this ideal they are worse than those whom they profess
to want to help
w
in all tblH throng and babel I am
trying to make my way and find the
patriotic Christian people who believe
In education and wish to make of
America tho model republic and a
realization of all we pray for when
wo say Thy will bo done on earth
as In heaven And there aro a
groat many good people here people
who are using their whole time and
fortuno In strenuous efforts to make
I
tho world better
Of courso as It is interesting to
tho readers of The Citizen to know
something about what is going on
in Now York so it Is Interesting to
people here to know something about
Iin
what is going on In Kentucky I
suppose it is really true that Ken
tucky is less known than almost any
I
other State There aro a great many
I Continued on fifth pace
Jiway
way to keep up with modern I
knowledge Is to read a good I W
newspaper
ow
z
II IiiVol XII Five cents a copy BEREA MADISON COUNTY KENTUCKY NOVEMBER 24 1010 One Dollar a year No 22 S
I
Mens Wear
WE are ready to show
you the newest in
Nobby Suits and
Overcoats Good prac
tical Clothes that are up
to your expectations in
every requirement
IOto20
FOR FINE QUALITY
Suits and Overcoats
OvercoatsH
High Grade
r HATS
HATSSHOES
SHOES
SHOESSHIRTS
t SHIRTS
HOSIERY
I ETC
At Popular Prices
1
p NEWS Of THE WEEK
Moody Retires Cooper Acquitted
Taft In Cuba Oklahomas Wrangle
Fall to Death Roosevelt In Wash
Ington Cost of Seine Governor
Methods of Trusts
JUSTICE MOODY RESIGNS
Justice William II Moody of tho
Supremo Court of the United Stales
has resigned his ofdco 111 health bJ
ing tho cause
EXPLOSION OF NAVAL GUNS
A serious explosion of four naval
r guns at Indian Head on the Potomac
River killed four and fatally Injured
several others An inquest to Investi
gate the matter will bo held
ROBIN COOPER ACQUITTED
Robin J Cooper charged with the
murder of Edward Ward Carmack of
Nashville Tunn United States Sen
ator on November V 1908 has been
pardoned This has been one of the
most celebrated cases in tho annals
of tho courts of Tennessee and great
Interest was manifested throughout
1of sUtosTAFT
TAFT VISITS CUBA
President Tuft tho first President
of tho United States to visit Cuba
is on his return to Hampton Roads
At Guantanamo ho made an inspec
tion of tho rifle rang and other
works of tho United States Naval
I
StationR003EVBLT
R003EVBLT AT WHITE HOUSE
For the first time slnco his pros
dency Mr Roosevelt visited tho White
House Ho called at tho Executive of
flee the Presidents office and Smith
sonian Institute to so the specimens
ho had sent from Africa Ho noted
with interest tho additions and chan
t gee
I wiGOV HASJCELLS 1ROCLAMATION
Governor 0 Haskell of Guthrie
GutbtlttI
I tile Legislature to meet at Oklahoma
City on Nov 28th to enact tho leg l
lation nocesasry to change tho loca
tion of tho state capitol Efforts arc
being made to resist this call on tho
ground that a two third vote of tho
Legislature is necessary to remove
the scat of the State Government
from Guthrlo
GuthrieAVIATOR
AVIATOR MEETS DEATH
DEATHI
Ralph Johnson holder of tho I
worlds high flight record was instant
ly killed at Denver Colorado by the I
apparatus of his machine falling to
work When about eight hundred
I foot from the ground tho middle spur
of tho lower plane gave way and
f the machine descended with a crash
Every bone In Johnsons body was I
broken und his mangled form was I
born from tho field by Hoxcy and
Brooklns who had boon In tho air
When tho accident occurred Johnson
broke the worlds greatest record at
Belmont Park in a flight of 971 < i
footFIRST
FIRST RIOTS THEN REBELLION
Tho antijingo riots in Mexico
which we reported In Tho Citizen
last week have almost assumed the
proportions of an organized rebellion
against the Dlaz government Fierce
fighting has been reported in vari
ous places and many deaths have re
sulted It is now thought that tho
government has the situation fairly
Continual ou fifth ate
II
I
PRESIDENT FROSTS LETTER
Writes Interestingly of New York
Compare with London and Paris
Notes Changes Size Beauty
Business Headquarters Many Good
PeopleNot Desirable for a Home
I So many people oxprcsstd pleasure
in reading our letters from London
that I havo thought I would write
ono or two from Now York
I am very much Impressed with
the resemblance between Now York
and the two other chief clUes of the
world London and Paris In each
of those allies you see a great many
I of tho same things There are thi
name pictures In the art stores the
same advertisements on the street
and tho same throngs and fashions
on tho sidewalk Yesterday I went
into an optical store to buy a self
registering thermometer for tho Col
lege ono that will toll you in the
morning how cold it was at the
coldest hour in tho night and thru
tall you how hot it was at the warm
est moment In the day I saw that
the firm which was conducting this
store had stores also in London and
Paris in streets that are very faint
liar to mo now
1 Every one speaks about tho rapidity
with which Now York Is changing
Whole streets of good houses that I
was familiar with five years ago have
boon destroyed in order that now and
taller buildings might take their
places And there Is a regular mov
ing of residences northward as tho
business blocks take their places tn
all tho southern part of tho city
i Many single buildings are so full
of offices and so many stories high
that they contain In tho middle of
n tho day sovoral thousand people Dur
ing tho first hours of tho morning
tho streets are filled with a gNat
throng of people all coming one way
towards tho business offices In tho
I
heart of the city Towards tho close
of tho afternoon these same people
pour out of tho offices and factories
and stores and fill all the sidewalks
street cars subways ferry boats
and railway trains leading away to
tho suburbs and nearby towns and vll
lagos whore they have their homesI
II Really New York is not ono city
but a dozen or twenty cities each
+ belonging to Its own nationality re
ligion and trade There aro more
Jews hero than in Jerusalem and
they are rapidly increasing Now
York is a great Catholic centre with I
Its cathedral and hundreds of priests
and nuns mostly supported by tho
great foreign populations that are
pouring in In many parts of thp
city you can hear several languages
spoken on the street The public
schools and churches aro doing a
great deal to Americanize tho for
eigners Tho Catholics in America
have become veer different from tho
Catholics In Italy and Spain
Ard of course Now York is tho
hfadiiartors of a great deal of the
buHutBt of tho country Hero are
the head offices of tho Standard Oil
Co and a thousand other great com
panics Tho great missionary socie
ties havo their headquarters here
And the number of newspapers pub
lished Js incredibly largo
f
T When You Come Into the City
either on business or to make a deposit
we cordially invite you to stop a moment
and get better acquainted with our officers
By telling us of your needs or plans for
developing your business or improving
your farm we may be able to point out
to you the manner in which you can de
rive greater benefit from our large mod
ern equipment and facilities
A SPLENDID LECTURE
So many good things bad been
said of Dr Greens lecture before its
delivery that his hearers expectations
wero surely pretty high but it is
certain that no one was disappointed
It was interesting entertaining in
structive inspiring educative It was
even more than that for Dr Green
possesses to an almost perfect degree
all the elements that go to make
up the perfect oratorpersonality
voice thought and the speakers art
Taking for his subject The Key
to the Twentieth Century he spoke
first of the Incomprehensibleness of
time that it could only be Judged
from the records of the past but
that In looking backward we could
see that there had been no accidents
in history and could trace the plan
Then rapidly sketching the west
ward course of empire ho came to
America And showed how Arnolds
prophecy that America holds the
yerltied
tied Some twenty years ago an
Oxford student had written What
America will do in twenty sears will
determine the next five hundred
years This Dr Green said Is
n paraphrase of my theme
After speaking of the nineteenth
as the century of invention and the
twentieth as the century of realiza
tion ho enlarged upon tho size of the
United States its nnterlul prosperity
tho wonderful power possessed by no
other nation in the history of the
world of assimilation of foreigners
In this connection his figure of the
grist mill was very striking
His closing thought was that tho
yellow peril threatening America was
that of greed and selfishness
LETTER FROM DELAWARE
Del City Del
Nov 17 1910
Editor of Tho Citizen
Berea Ky
SirYou
You will find enclosed a clipping
of tho New York World in regard to
Berea College which I know is a
false statement and a disgrace to
Berea and tho entire Eastern Ken
tucky
I would suggest that tho attention
of the President of Berea College be
called to this matter
I am a citizen of Eastern Kentucky
and I desire to enter my protest I
knoll that these Now Yorkers think
they can print anything that comes
to their minds and no ono will haw
the nerve to say anything about it
either to deny or admit Having
thus expressed my feelings in this
matter I shall leave It In your hands
to use youf judgment how much to
print and what to leave out
I also give you permission to pub
lish this letter
letterVery
Very respectfully
respectfullyChas
Chas C Farmer
Ed Note We do not publish any
of the clipping but reference is made
to it both in an editorial and in
Pres Frosts letter
ACT OF A MISCREANT
Last Saturday night tho town WAS
aroused by an alarm of fire The bell
rang and students citizens and the
fire company were soon on the streets
running from place to place as direct
ed by different signals but no fire
was found This Is the second time
this fall that some miscreant ban
turned in false alarms The Citizen
knows no language sufficiently se
vere for such acts and hopes that tho
criminal will bo hunted out and dealt
with according to his deserts
IN OUR OWN STATE
Program for Governors Conference
Tardy Justice In Wendling Case
Tho Boy Scout MovementFor
Secretary of AgricultureMine on
Firei
NOT A PLEASURE JAUNT
The Governors Conference which
convenes in Frankfort next week is
not to bo a mere pleasure jaunt It
Is to bo a great representative as
sembly where public questions uf
burning importance are to be IIfI
cussed Not onjy arc the Governors of I
tho 46 states expected to be present
but tho 24 Governorselect have been
invited and many of them will oC
course be there Such subjects as the
direct election of United States Son
ators conservation of our National
Resources a method of securing nn
Income tax law a corrupt practices i
act uniform divorce laws and ft
method whereby the constitution ot
tho United States may be amended
more expeditiously will bo dlscussodV t
discussI
KENTUCKYS POPULATION
POPULATIONfTho
Tho Census Bureau will soon an
nounco the population of the state I
and fears are being expressed based
upon the poor showing of increase
made by some of tho cities whose
population has already been announc
ed that the state may lose a con I
I
gressman owing to the want of
growth
TARDY JUSTICE
Or
Joseph Wendling accused of the
murder of Alma Kellner nearly a
year ago and who has been in jail t
In Louisville for throe months is to r
bo tried next Monday The trial will
1bo
I
over legal subtleties and technicalities
and the chances are that after the
state has spent thousands of dollars l f
I rhas
has already had to overrule a number I
of motions by the attorneys numberf
defense which ware only made In an
effort to delay or trip tho Judge and 1
get ground for a new trial in case of k
conviction Wendling and Dr Crlp i
pen were apprehended about thoI
same time Crippen was tried nnllI
convicted in three days his appeal
has been heard and rejected and t
his execution took place yesterday
The Citizen asked its readers tot
watch the proceedings In each case
Crlppen In England Wendling in
America
FOR RANK NS PLACE
ExState Senator Newman of Ver
jsalles the present secretary of tho
thoI
1 Porto Rico to aid in the organizationw
of tho Insular Fair there on the eve j
of his departure announced his can fj
didacy for tho office of Secretary
of AgrlcnltureI
BOY SCOUTS
During tho Boer War In South Afri
I ca General BadenPowell in thp de
sire to help boys to become useful
I citizens organized what ho called
I
tho Boy Scouts Tho organization
I has spread rapidly and now has bran tt
ches in nearly all civilized nationst
j ifIn
ofItho
tho movement is to teach true pat t
riotism to whatever flag one may f
live under <
Four patrols of eight young men
each are soon to bo organized in Lot It
LorIington
Iington Ky
KyMINE
MINE ON FIRE Z
I State Mine Inspector Norwood re
calved information from Stearns
I Pulaski County lato last Saturday
that one of the mines was on fire
and asking for assistance The asslsv
tant Inspector was immediately sent l
IItant 1
with the rescue apparatus authorizedf
by the last legislature This Is the
Continued on fifth page
A
i
ij

xml | txt