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The citizen. [volume] (Berea, Ky.) 1899-1958, January 12, 1922, Image 2

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THE CITIZKN
January 12, 1022
MICKIE,THE PRINTER'S DEVIL
By Ourlrl Sughroe
tan Hi si.ii m
Around Town Gossip,
( SQUIRE SeZ TW "TAOCR AlWT MEVfLR
1ec4 ASl TO DU-L MO SPELUrl mTO
U KIDS HEAD, SO UG. UtCKOU TU' POOR
CAQXODVV&T 0 A UNOTNPfc OPtRWOU
7
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7
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,PROAN AMD OF EVENTWWGt
I U&PAtfTS. SPENT WSVACMVOU
UERE SMOOTIKiGr TIKI CAUS VJOVX UK ARM )
AUTOVAkTlC 'M BRA&VilM ABOUT WOVJ ME I
TACVCV.E VjVA j-
' GtMMS VMFFVCS WAS EEVi TWm)aV4G '
TU' tttVViO EVE. SVACE UAST 0AAt
OU 'OAROAMEOA" &UT HOW TUKt SutS
PRETTN GOOO AT IT, MO&ODN SEEVAS
TO UEABVT
(
V
& lain " Mil
I U&i. OFWEN'S U'L DOG "CUrvf COME.
OUT FBOA OUDtR TV WZONTT PORCM AVTER
WS TWO WN S' UUNGta STWKE - VE
KAA0E.TW' KWSTAKt OF BARVUVy At WU.
"EPUWVAAUv"
A Hero of
Faith
By REV. J. R. SCHAFFER
Director of Evening Claaaea. Moody
Bible Institute, Chicago.
-1 Y
TEXT. By faith Abel offered unto Ood
a mort excellent aavrtflce than Cain
Hab. 11:4.
God ha hi heroes. Ill Ikok recounts
ttelr wondrous exploits. They are
heroes of faith.
Tli first of them
In Abel, the wo-nnil-horn
of earth.
We ask. "What
(treat ileeil Imtli
he wrought T The
r ,W v J Htmic b a. "By
-3 I faith Abel offered
v. JL. unto God a more
excellent sacrifice
than Cain, hj
wliii-h he obtained
witness that he
was righteous.
God testifying of his Rifts ; aud by It
he being dead yet spenketh."
Here there Is tuithliiK. aianntly. of
brave diirine. of counict'ous abutnlon,
of sublime heroism. Why then should
such a simple deed he carved In the
Imperishable granite of God's Word?
The most erfect picture ever con
ceived of life and all Us hallowed re
lationships in found in the opening
chapters of Genesis. Hut the charm of
that life was dispelled by the blight
ing Invasion of sin. Sinful nature, sin
ful environment an( sinful atmosphere
was the bequest of Adum and Eve to
tbelr countless posterity, yet God did
not abandon Ills disobedient children.
He loved them. His love furnished an
antidote for tbelr sin. Before they
left I'aradise the gospel of sulvution
was proclaimed, redemption offered
and righteousness provided.
There Is every reason to believe that
the guilty pu rents of the nice accepted
the divine plun of salvation when they
put on the robes of substitution God
brought to them. Wonderful Indeed
must this all have been to them.
Oh, how could they sin In the midst
of love and light and liberty! They
did, and deserved sin's Inevitable con
sequence, death ; but God, whose grace
was greater than all their aln. brought
salvation ere tliey suffered the conse
quences of disobedience.
Their life outside begun very natu
rally, I should say Just life as It has
continued to the present. They set up
their home, as near the gute of the
Garden as possible, doubtless hope fill
ing their hearts of getting hack again.
Children were born Into Unit home,
two boys. Cult) seemed so much the
child of promise t tin t his mother named
him "Gotten." Before the second horn
was welcomed she had learned that he
was not the promised Seed of the wom
an, who was to bring deliverance from
sin's curse. When her second son was
born she culled his name "Abel," mean
ing "vanity," which seemed to he
confirmation of ber disappointment In
her first-born.
The boys grew up. Father and moth
er told theiri of Paradise with Its dark
tragedy and also of Its glorious hope
In the God given promise anil the way
of eternal life. The time of personal
responsibility came when they must,
like furber and mother, believe God
or reject Ills way. A choice was de
manded because sin had become per
sonal. Wlint would they do? God had
said an offering alone could meet the
need.
Both brought an offering. Culn's
was one of human reasoning. He con
sidered it better than the one God hnd
tuuglit his father and mother to bring.
It was more beautiful, the work of his
brnln and bunds. No life had been
forfeited to provide It. But aim. It
was the rejection of God's way. the
preferment of his own. Therefore It
had in It the essence of sin. for sin. Is
self-w ill, self-pleuslng. self exaltation.
God rejected Cain's offering and
Cain "lis wroth. He was denied his
own WHV.
"AbeT brought the very best lamb of
the flock. Just as he hud been taught.
He believed God. He responded by
doing what God asked him to do. By
fiiltb he offered his sacrifice. This, In
tte face of the attitude of his older
brother, wns heroism indeed. When
any man In loyalty to God dares to
run counter to pipular opinion or to
defy the consensus of human reason.
It requires a heroism that exceeds that
.if tha tin It Ititfoltl nrwl in il.ui'm BI..K
v. ..... .-..-. ... ... u...a, M ' " Blfilll, I
.. .. I ... .. . 1 . i. I . 1 1 I
ovniis nun nun glory unu liunor SUCH
as this world knows not.
" God accepted Abel's offering. Even
so God accepted Christ's death. He
was delivered for our offences and
raised for our Justification.
Oh, ran you not see what value God
puts upon the blood, even from the be
ginning, for He has declared that
"without the shedding of blood there
Is no remission of sins." There Is only
one way of salvation through the
blood of Calvary's Lamb. There Is
only one title to heaven not moral
ity or good works, or personal virtue,
or self-sacrifice, or death for another,
but that title which Is the inheritance
of the siilnts In light through faith
In the Son of God.
TWO KINDS OF TRAINED
NURSES
One of the men best informed re
garding' hospital practice recently
dropped the remark that the Trained
Nurses of the United States are now
one of the most h'ghly paid, highly
organized and overbearing: of all thj
labor unions.
The service they can render is a
real one, and there have been so few
trained nurses that they have all
found employment among the rich at
very high wages, and with many per
quisites like opportunities to travel
with invalids. In order to retain
these advantages the number of nur
ses must be limited, and this limita
tion the Nurses Union seeks to se
cure by making it more and more dif-
fVult to enter the profession. Of
course the plea is "raising the stan-
dard."
On the other hand statesmanlike
physicians like the Mayo Brothers,
as well as certain hospitals of high
standing, have set out to increase the
number of trained nurses, and to pro.
vide a s;niple and practical trainirg
that will make it possible for people
who are not millionaires to have
helpers at their sick-beds.
Naturally these efforts are hotly J
resented by the Nurses' Union. As
part of their propogamia an article
by their head organizer, Isabel!
Stewart, appeared in last week's Citi
len. She expresses her fear that it
may soon be possible for nurses with
real ability and skill to be obtained
by families that cannot pay more
than "the modest sume of $15 or at
most $25 a week"!
Now would it be a calamity if, we
common folks should be able to get
the services of a helper in illness at
these modest figures? According to
W. I. King, whose book on incomes
in the United States is just out, less
than one person in 24 among Ameri
cans who have incomes at all have as
much as $40 a week. It is evident
then that the vast ajority of us
must get help in sickness at these
modest figures or go without.
Isabel 1 Stewart intimates that any
one who has not had a threu years
course in nursing is only a rretender
like Dicken's Sairy Gamp. Is this
fair or generous way to treat an ef
fort to provide some nurse-care In
reach of the common people? Is it
not a "dog in the manger" attitude?
There is no objection to any kind of
course she chooses for those who are
to serve the rich, or to be superinten
dents of hospitals and the like. But
has she any right to deny practical
nurses to those who need them? For
a hospital to refuse to train any ex
cept these super-nurses is like navy
yard that turns out nothing but
dreadnaughts, when the navy needs
lighter craft aa well!
Can life be saved and the sick be
made comfortable by persons who
have had less than this new three
year course? The conclusive answer1
is that it has been done. Nearly all !
that has ever been done by nurses has'
been done by those who have had far 1
less than three years in resident t
training. I
Of course much ilcpemLs upon the
kird of training given. In some hos-,
pitals girls get more the first three
months than in other hospitals in
long years. The way to "raise the
standard" would be t make the in-,
stmction more systematic, varied
and intensive rather than to lengthen
the time. Too much instruction is i
given by physicians who scorn or ;
neglect all the principles of good
teaching. Many hospitals are
Berea College Hospital
Rett Equipment and Service at lowest Cost. Wards for Men and for Worien.
Sun-Parlor, Private RiHm, Katha, Electric Service.
Surgery, Care in Child-birth, Eye, Note and Ear
GENERAL PRACTICE
Come in and Ult an establishment, which l a friend In need,
and In reach of all the people.
Rombt H. Cownf, M.D Physician
HAaLAK lli'Dlli, M.i'., Physician
I'KASt. II lluivi, M. I ', I'hysican
Miss Ki.ianrth I.. I.wi, K. N , Superintendent
Miss Ntl.l. Gasixn, K. V, Head Nurse
CHANCE IN RATES
Hates for hoard and room of private patienla will be f tj to
j per werk: fi 50 to $1 imi per day. The ralrj for pati
ents cared for in the wards fo per day.
My Order of Prudential Committee. Herea College
HAS TWO PAIRS OF HORNS
Chouka ef India, Small Antalops Cifttsl
With More Than Its Share of
Htad Ornamarita.
Four or sit homed uiilnutls are found
In certain parts of Asia. Principal
among these la t tie four hinied chouka,
a sum 1 1 antelope of India. Its name be
ing derlted from the native word
so choiik. meaning a leap
small that little new experience can Its front pair of horns are short
be given after the first year. and placed Just above the eyes, while
Dut after all, what do we common 1 'he larger otiea are In the usual posl-
folks need in a nurse? She must;""1' ""fr "n "" ,,'"'n
, . . . , m i of the upper horn Is about three or
know how to understand and follow; "
,1 four Inches, tbough the lower ones
the doctor directions that is the rm.,y nr , (m u ni) ni
great thing. And next she must come ,.,.n US(. fr th,., na ,ver tM,. ,n.
to the bedside with real sympathy ( eo ered by naturalists,
and not with merely a professional The chouka la a beautiful little
interest in a new "case." Some wo- j creature with Its bright bay back con
men have "a healing touch." Tii rs.te.,l with the gray white of the
. . 1 ... . K ' under part, beneath which are the
bedside work is now done by ama-, . ... .....
... . . ., .. lithe legs that enable It to make the
teursrelatives and neighbors.
would be better done if persons with, rh(-lka rHr(,y 5,, nrh ' redu.vd the upright ahaft to
natural gifts in mis nirection couiu n, ).ght at the shoulders.
have an attainable training, to give ; In tbelr wild state all aheep were ,
quickly the experience that could furnished with a pair of horns, but ' Bamaraabla Potato Growth,
come only slowly In private practice. 'he number never exceeded two until A man In Ontario has on exhibition
Any course of training has its chief 1 specimens were dlscov a strange specimen of potato growth.
value in starting the pupil in lines!""' ,n u '!" ." '" !
, . . .. . ... . . , i These apeclinens hud from four to six . left In hla cellar had produced a new
of improvement that will I be earned horfin ,h( uiif Mug Kri()uil,w ,,, .,,, Wf T,lf nfw frowfh
on in her independent work. j v-un tne ,i,iaM onea Just above the evidently came from the heart of the
Here then are crowds of girls for : yea. , ,M,tato, and as the new one devel-
w'hom $15 a week means independ- Curiously enough, the two lower sets ope. I. the old one split owii. The new
always curie upwnrd. while the large ' potato la about the aire of an egg, and
pair curve downward Asia Magatlne
and In the bottom of the glass. "In
I stimtly the thought of gold flashed
over him, for black sand Is an Indi
cator of go, liearlng formations He
, dr-w iii"re water lml!ly and. pun
lilng It In a cntnenlei.t c.Mikiiig pun
I found g"'d lis well as (lakes of tul, a
S"ine bcie along li e cr e'.s wlib h
supply Y;iiK',ii er ul'ti wa'cr there
must nti I - ei e. tll ieMisls -
or el -i- tin- 1; . tli. t l.ii I t:,e (e.l.l.-ii
l.k'i; I- i" -iitf "Ut l"i .i- In a isiiiiiiioii
(ras tiiin ei.
Spoiled a Curiosity.
Tl. ere a a f. inn, ii ns k In Kan
a. kii"n us ' I 111! rvlla Hock" or
Toadstool IPs k" whose strange for
mation, Indli'Mteil hy tli names given
It. made it a rltal of the noted stone
formations of Colorado's "Garden of
,be teals" Hut the owner of the land
on which It whs located, between Car
nerlo and Kaiiopolia. In Kttaworth
county, feared Hint the big granite
boulder forming the "umbrella" would
topple over from the upright shaft
and kill some of his cattle. 80 ho
tuera
pile of atone Kxcbange.
ence, and crowds of sick people who
cannot afford to employ Isabell Stew
art. And here are the brief, inten
sive, practical courses, that ran fit
the girls for this Christlike service.
We do not Iie'ieve that Isabell Stew
art can prevent this good thing from
being done.
Friend of the Poor Man
partially protrudes from the
moat receci" of the old one.
'Inner-
Cold From a Kitchen Tap.
Gold straight from (lie faucet hn
cell ipsiiivered In Vaucoim r. Uriilsh
oiiiinlilii. K, Gartley. an exiicrlcn.-ed I no value "
1 lit nte prosiiector, whs getting a dr 11k "Nothing to If
' Ma'er not lung ago at li's kli. lieu
I- w hen he not lied a trios1 of '
Of Courao.
Some say Itusali.n pier money has
l'Her of any kind
ha a value if properly baled." taut,
vllle Courier lonn al
BEREA COLLEGE SUMMER SCHOOL
First Term Opens June 16, 1922 Suitable Courses to Meet All Needs
Special Attention Given to Teacher Training and Community Service
r r . . " ww
et
T a.
COURSES OFFERED IN ALL THE SCHOOLS OF BEREA COLLEGE
COLLEGE Botany, Chemistry, Education, Eng
lish, French, Mathematics, Psychology, Ag
riculture, Public Speaking.
NORMAL SCHOOL Education, Psychology,
Mathematics, Science, English. Drawing,
Play and Games, Recreation, Weaving,
Cooking and Nutrition, History, Rural Soci
ology. ACADEMY History. Algebra, Geometry, Phys
ics, English, Latin.
VOCATIONAL SCHOOL-Commerce, Home
Science, Agriculture, Stenography, Type
writing, Weaving.
FOUNDATION SCHOOL-For making up de
ficiencies necessary for entrance in a sec
ondary school.
LOCATION: Berea College is located in the
beautiful little town of Berea, Ky., on the
dividing ridge between the Mountains and
the Blue Grass. The situation is admirably
adapted for summer study.
The spacious grounds, cool shades, pleasant
walks, and scenic drives are ideal for recre
ation and pleasure. A trip to Anglin Falls,
Brush Creek Caves, Boonesboro Fort and
"Uncle Tom's Cabin" will never be forgot
ten. The large library, comfortable class
rooms, and interesting instructors promote
good scholarship.
All courses are standard, leading to secondary
diplomas or College degrees.
The Normal courses are on a level with State
Normal School requirements and lead to
State Certificates.
SI MM Kit SCHOOL EXPENSES
Five W'eeka
Incidental Fee $ 7.50
Itoom Kent 5.00
Table Hoard (Women) 13.00
Ten W'eeka
I 12.50
10.00
30.00
Total for Women
Table Hoard for Men . . . .
$ 27.50
16.25
Total for Men t 28.75
I 52.50
32.50
55.00
Write for accommodations or other information to
MARSHALL E. VAUGHN.
CLOYD N. MCALLISTER Secretary Berea College
Director Summer School Berea. Kentucky
V X - d a 11
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