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The citizen. (Berea, Ky.) 1899-1958, March 16, 1922, Image 1

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CUUWIN MISS E K
I JUL 21
The Citizen
Devoted to tta.e Interests of tlie gonnteLlii People
EEREA PUBLISHING CO.
(IMCOMPOItATU)
Oar Threefold Ala: Te fire
the Nsws ef Berea and VWnrtyj
To Record Um Happenings ef
Berea Collect; To U of Interest
to ill the Mountain Peead.
MARSHALL E. VAUGHN.
I . IIIHMAtOT
ef JS fcAs
ml Jlma, AV. m imi4
f Mara. rr.
rSMA0a AVrs TwrMrfAy t 0epa
A
Vol xxni.
rive Cents Per Copy
BEREA, MADISON COUNTY, KENTUCKY, MARCH 16, 1922
0n Dollar and Fifty Ctnti Par You
No. 3
NEWS REVIEW OF
CURRENT EVENTS
Warren G. Harding Completes
His First Year as President
of United States.
FALL AND WALLACE IN CLASH
A mart Government Declmee to Par
tieipate In Cenoa Conference
Lloyd Qeorge'e Threatened
fteeionation fourteenth
Canadian Parllrment
Opened Flume
Fumea Again.
By JOHN DICKINSON SHERMAN
WAKItKN . IIAItIMM! lit noon of
Marrh 4 completed hi first year
aa President of the It.lted State, lb
mi asked fr an exprvaalon regarding
tho eecrnlllimeiit of Me sdmliilstrn
tlon lo dale ami authorised thl stale
aietit :
"Tlie twocd of the administration
spesks for Itself; It would be a oor
administration tlmt required the tr
tie to ats-wk for It."
At an entertainment hy the National
Press rlub In honor of the first oflblal
birthday the I "resident aalil :
"Tlie long 'cp toward getting bark
toward normal way of govenimi-tit
would seem to mi to have been I ho
a"1leveniefit of the year."
Reftreoetitatlve Fr of fhlo, chalr
man of the KeHihllcan rongrelonal
committee, made In the hou a orh
setting forth In detail the accnmpllsh
Dwnta of the year from the ltepuhlh-an
viewpoint, lie dwelt on economies,
actual and pmtMctlve. H Mid that
tho United State would he the only
forernmefit In the world living Ithln
Ita revenues next year. If It roiild keep
within the emlmate outlined hjr the
admlnlatnitlon. Hevlcwlng the work
of tho ami conference, he mild : "I
challenge the record to produce a
greater achievement In the hltory of
diplomacy."
TVmorraMr member then pris-insled
to tear to piece the Feaa eulogy from
thNr atandpolnt. Cnrdell Hull, chair
man of tlie ftemocrntlc national com
mlttfw. aleo took tue with the Kea
statement Ilia general position la that
while the Repuhllcnn corgmui hn en
acted a multiplicity of unimportant
lawa and the arm conference provid
ed for a limited program of naval re
duction the Republican party haa
failed to carry nut Ita major prom
laro made In the campaign of lfrjO.
Now. In the house debate over the
admlnlatratloti'a statement of econo
mlea Few talked exactly aa If he te
lleved everything he "aid and the
remorrate talked hack exactly aa If
ttiey believed everything they aalil.
And the taxpayer In the gallery knew
that everyhodv couldn't he telling the
troth, the whole truth and nothing but
the truth. The upshot waa that llif
rettetitatlve Ityrne of Tennessee, rank
ing Pemorratlc member of the appro
priation committee, secured the ps
ajre of a resolution cnlllng upon the
Pmddeiit to Inform tlie house In what
way the saving had been made, from
what poiilcular approprliitliHis iitid In
what sjieclnc amount. Thereupon the
Preeideiil Instructed Onenil Unwes
Of the budget liurvnu to prepurt n
complete Ktatement coverlnij the en
tire altuatlon. 'One thing hi l"i-t
atanda out rlenrly : N.ohhIv IimiIi
that "II -I and Marin" I . lll give
tho facta and nsure h they in-e.
I'mtldent and Mrv lliir.llin left
Waablngtmi Wedneediiy evenlni; hv
train for Nt. AUKUNtlne. K1m. The pr--IdenUal
iarty Includiil Attortiev ien
oral Ilaugherty, SMHker tllUitt, I'n
deraecrelHry of State r'ietiher. Ilrig
adlor (hneral Sawyer. Mk imtwhiuI
physician, and tieorge R. ClirlMtlmi,
nla axwrelary. Mr. CJirlHtlan Kalil the
Preaidetit would occupy Ida lime In
"rent and reTeatloti." In Florida for
a week or .
PITCHKI) battle between the In
terior and Agricultural depart
ments which haa long been watched
by official WaKhlngton with abnorblng
Intereat haa now become "public"
through a statement by Secretary Fall
that he had protcMed to I'n'Hldetit
Ilanilng aguliiNt the clrculallon of
"vlAoua propaiindii emanating fmm
tba ItepMrtiiicut of Agriculture." The
battle. In brief. In over Icglitlutlon.
pending and prtwpectlve, which would
trmiHfer the foreM service from the
Agriculture department to the Interior
depuriiuent und praitlciilly tuni over
the de c kiiftit of the imturul re
sources of Aluska to the Interior de
partment, Willi reNMiiiHibility to the
I'renlileiit This battle Is not a petty
quarrel between two departments. It
Is a real buttle between two cabinet
member. Some of the old timers luke
It so acrlouxly as to predict the resig
nation of one or the other of the.
secretaries Moreover, the buttle la
significant us ludlcutlng the difficul
ties thai He In the way of the pnoel
reorganization of all the executive
department.
Until IlkKi the Interior department
controlled all the public lamia. The
national fureNts were then created for
tho appllcatjoti of scientific, lumber-
(Coutiuued on Page Two)
32 SLAIN, 57 HURT
IN AFRICAN REVOLT
WORKERS' HUH BOMBARDED
Nineteen Policemen Are Among
Those Killed in Strike
Battle.
Heaviest Catualtiae Suffered In Ex
treme Eastern Section of the Rand
Proclamation of Martial Law
27 Officials Injured.
JnhMnnexburg, t'nlon of South Af
rica, Klurch 13. 4'nunltlea In the
fighting between the striking miners
and police bus reached XI killed and
07 Injured, of the 3J killed 1U were
policemen.
Ity II o'clock, however, the streets
had become ubsolulely deeerted, and
the town whs uncannily quiet. The
public was forbidden uo of the
streets.
Tho workers' hull at Itenoni la re
ported to have been tilt by a bomb
dropped from an airplane. The heav
iest casualties In the dlxtrlit are be
lieved to have been suffered In tho
eitreme eastern sections of the Rand.
Hold move by the striking miners,
accompanied by fierce righting be
tween striker, commando and pollr,
mode yesterday one of terror In the
Rand. Martial law eventually waa
proclaimed.
Manager Krodlgan of the Rrakpan
mine, the renter of much of the day'a
fighting, and two special ronstablos
were raptured and taken out on tho
veldt and ahot. Seven special consta
bles, protecting the mine, were killed.
Capture 27 Police.
The striker also captured 27 police
men at .Vewland. west of Johannes
burg, where spirited fighting occurred,
threatening to shoot them all If other
police came to the rescue. At Fords
burg one man, of a commando, or
force of burghers, was killed and 13
member and 4 policemen were
wounded. The sound of artillery fir
ing at Fordxburg was audible here.
With the proclamation of martial
law and the seizure of the striken'
headquarter, where all documents
were confiscated, the populace felt
senile of relief. The ministers of Jus
tice and defense have Issued a state
ment denying rejairts of a contem
plated native rising In the Rand. They
axexrt there Is no disposition on the
part of the natltes to give trouble.
Meanwhile, military units are enroll
ing with remaik ible Hpecd and a Cltl
ren" rrntectlve letigue Is Selng formed
to run public Kcrvlcc.
Firing started at llenonl enrly In the
in. .mini: Street lighting followed.
both able suffering casualties. Many
pedi'Mtrtan were lilt. For two hours
the irroiinil between the Itenoni mar
ket iuare and I he worker' hall was
a battle srea: then tlie police formed
with the object of surrounding the
hall. There wa continuous sniping
and three person fell dead, one of
them a policeman.
Newt Men Fear Revolt
London, March 11. The general
strike culled by the miners' leudera
at JolimiiicMhurg I In reality a revolu
tionary movement, according to tJic
('uMtown correspondent of the tMilly
Telegraph. The strike Issue has been
eclipsed by the threat against the
t ute, he says.
There wu some simulation over
Premier Smuts' deluy III proclaiming
martial law, which was regarded as
gravely overdue, but It la understood
he was art um ted by fear that such a
step would precipitate a cotitllct In
which the strikera, who are mainly
I Mitch, might be re-enforced from the
veldt.
The Johannesburg correspondent of
the name iiewspiiK'r reports that a
number of Imtch furmera In the ltoks
burg and Itenoni districts huve Joined
the strikera and formed mounted com
mandos which attacked Itenoni.
The Times' Johannesburg corre
spondent, on the oilier hand, aecrihea
the trouble to a widespread Ilolabevlst
plot, and says the Fordshurg com
niaudo regards Itself a a red guard.
He adda that the fighting la In prog
res throughout the Rand, the most
severe trouble being In the eastern
ectinn. lie believes that the police
will soon gain the upier hund In Jo
hannesburg and Itenoni, but admits
that, owing to the prevailing chaos. It
la dlltlcult lo verify the various re
ports. SKYSCRAPER IS PLANNED
For Berlin, Where Permit Calls For
20 Story Office Structure
Herlln. llcrlln's first skyscraper, 20
atoriOH high, la to be erected soon. Tba
building intiiiU has been granted.
Tho structure will stand Frled
rlchstrass', near where that street
crnssea the river Spree.
Tho lund belonged to tho (ity and
wa given u the construction com
Hiny for 2,ia,i0 murks, a nominal
price, as the city wlshe to encouniKO
the erection of nk srraors to relieve
ciaigoKtlon in oltlivs.
Tlu tallest building In Herlln la Bvo
atories bigh.
fc' W-x , r-i .- 1 f Vvil
1 Foitner rosimaster General Will llajs b-avlis; his last cabinet meeting lo become nn.t.on picture arbiter;
he's talking t Vliv I'n-Udint I'oolidre; left to right are Secretaries Mellon. Wallace, ftavl. Fall, ibsiver and
Ianby. 2- Mrs. p. Ilndhk. Field". Minn., with Senators I.add (N. I.) and N orris (Neb.) on left and light; abe
testltleil before Senate Atrrli'iiliiiral conniiitte. : I'rince Faud I'usha, heir to Khedive of Kgypt.
AMERICAN LEGATION
AT SOFIA BOMBED
UNITEO STATES MINISTER UN
HURTBUILDING DAMAGED
BY BLAST
Fact That No One Was In The Liga
tion At Tho Time Appears to Indi
cate That Perpetrator of Outrage
Had No Intention of Killing Anyone.
Sofia. An explosion occurred In tho
Americiiu legation here. No one was
Injured, hut a number of the windows
were shattered and damage was done
to the building.
Charle S. Wilson, American Minis
ter, expresses the belief that the ex
plosion wa due to a bomb.
Tlie bomb wa thrown shortly be
fore H o'cloi-k in the night and landed
In the ganlen of the legation. The
fact that this psrl of the 1Ogutlon
wu without light and that no on
was there at the time appears to Indl'
rate that tho perpetrator of the out
rage had no Intention of killing any
one.
The King and Cabinet have express
ed ilersi regret to tlie American Minis
ter and grutlficution that no one wa
Injured. Hulgariun public opinion
strongly condemns the act.
WKliingiiay The only official me,
sage reaching the State Ikcpartment
regarding the explosion In the Amer
bum legation at Sofia was a ruble
gram sent by Charles S. Wilson, Min
ister, coinciding with the information
contained in tlie Press dispatches.
The niesxiige said the explosion oc
curred in the chancery of the legation
at h o'clock at night, breaking all the
chancery windows and causing addi
tional .lani.ite. hut that no one wa
in tlie legation at the time. The ca
blegram added that the preliminary
Hliv Investigation indicated the ex
plosion was caused by a bomb.
DIES OF INTERNAL SCALDS
t'hlcHni. Joseph Suskl, 4 year old.
died this afternoon of Internal scald,
canned from drinking coffee out of the
pout of a boiling pat.
The child was alone In the kitchen
of his home. He coul I smell the cof
fee boiling on the stove. He pulled
a chair up to tho stove so he could
reach the boiling pot. Ho swallowed
several mouthful of the boiling liquid
from Uie spoilt of the pot.
THIRTY ONE TAKE BRIDES
Rerlln. Accompanying the Fifth
Amorican Infantry Regiment for Ant
werp last Friday on the first stage of
the voyage to the I'nited States
.11 (iennan brides of soldiers und
eight bubii-s horn under the protec
tion of the Sturs und Sirie on the
Rhine. It is retried here that the
town of Mayence, lo mile west of
Cohlcn. in the American sector, will
receive a garrison of .Vs) French
troops.
CREEK CABINET QUITS
Athens. King t'ouatHiitlne has
charged Nicholas Stratus, former Min
ister of Marine, w ith tlie formation of
a new raliim:.
An Allien correspondent reMrtt the
ri giuition of tho (huinuria tluhiuet
The dispatch adds that a prolonged
crisis is expected, .is ii -h 1 n
Liberals can form a government which
will survive.
"VICE" INQUIRY ORDERED
St. l.ouls, Mo. A committee of five
was empowered lo Investigate churge
of Victor J. Miller. President of tlie
Hoard of I'nlli-e 'o Isslouers. that
immoral condition existed in Knlilun
High School here, at a meeting of
parents and olhvl ils of that Institu
tion, aud civic ortiaiilr.utJous toduy.
THIRTY-FIVE KILLINGS BEFORE
BREATHITT COURT
It ia reported that the Breathitt
county circuit court convened Mon
day, March 13, with thirty-five mur
der cases on the docket Fifteen of
the cases involve the slaying; of five
men in the Clay Hole precinct on
election day. It ia believed that at
least four week of the term will be
given over exclusively to criminal
cases.
CLAY COUNTY MEN WANTED
Governor Edwin P. Morrow last
Thursday issued three requisitions on
the governor of Ohio, all for men in
Clay county. They were for Oliver
Herutley, charged with false swearing;,
Stephen Bowling, charged with ma
licious shooting and wounding, and
Vassie Combs, wanted on the charge
of drawing a cold check for $49-70
on the Jackson county bank of McKee
in" feyeqr of T. C. McDaniel when be
had no funds in the bank with which
to meet the check.
TWO HELD IN MERCER ON
WHISKY CHARGES
Grand Jury Returns Twenty-Six In
dictmenta Before It Is
Dismissed
William Wade and Ernest Thomp
son, tried before County Judge B. C.
Allin of Mercer, March 9. charged
with having whisky in their posses-
s ion, were held to the May grand jury
on $.100 bond each. Wade waa fined $50
and sentenced to fifty days in jail
on a charge of breach of the peace.
He could not furnish bond. C. M.
Ievine went on Thompson's bond.
RADIO MUSIC FGUSES ACTORS
Equity Association Objects to Frcs
Concerts Via Ether Wants
Performers Paid.
New- York. March 1.1. Appreciative
but nmipavlng wireless amateurs who
have tie.ii sitting ut home and listen
ing to world famous entertainers face
an edict of the Actor' Kqulty associ
ation that Mitch performers must be
pnld for their work. Announcement
is iniole 1 1 in t the council of the as
sociation ba ruled that the radiophone
Is competing with the theater und
that tbie-e who talk or sing In the
transmitting uppuriitu must be com
Hiisated In the lat few months
there have Imm-ii numberless free con
certs, free stage iM-rforuuinees. free
lecture nod other features supplied
to the owners of radiophones. The
ether wave currying these entertain
ments hnve been picked up hundreds,
even thousands, of miles distant by
receiving "sets," which are as com
mon as home-brew out tits.
BABY VOLCANO!
Mexico I'lty. A small volcano,
which is showing sIl'Iis of ui-livlty. bus
been formed within tlie crater of Poio
cutapctl, I'll mile west of the city of
Pueblii. Persons who have returned
from un exploration trip on PoHicat
eiifll sav the new vol.vmn has nil tho
characteristic of Its parent.
HOAX IS ALLEGED
New York. W. II. Anderson, Sujier
liitenitenl of the New York Anti-Saloon
League, ussertcd that President
Harding und Administration leaders,
as well as numerous I hj-inocrutlc lead
ers, had been Innocent victims of a
hoax, In lh.it Ihelr names li.nl been
signed without uutlisrily lo u list pur
torling to be one of tlie olticers of
"Tlie Constitutional League of Amer
ica," which, accord. ng lo Mr. Aoder
s 'it, ia u l.ber.il body.
BATTLE FOLLOWED BY STILL
CAPTURE IN MONTGOMERY
COUNTY
A 10 gallon still w&a captured on
March 13, near, Mt. Sterling, Kyn by
officer Gulfoile, after a gun battle
with the operators who escaped. No
arrests have been made.
FORMER MADISON GIRL TAKES
HER OWN LIFE
Miss Demje Gabbard, the nineteen
year-old daughter of Pete Gabbard,
shot and killed herself at her home
near Hamilton, O. The Gabbarda were
formerly citizens of Bear Wallow,
Madison county. Having sold their
farm something like a year ago, they
bought and moved near Hamilton.
Miss Demfe was a fine girl and loved
by all who knew her. The remains
were brought to Pilot Knob for
burial.
GRAVES COUNTY HAS WOMAN
SHERIFF
Mrs. Lois Roach, widow of Sheriff
John C. Roach, who waa ahot and
killed in his office at Mayfield a short
time ago, was appointed to succeed
her husband in office aa sheriff of
Graves county. She was appointed
to serve until the next election in
1923. Mrs. Roach qualified and as
sumed the authority of office imme
diately afterward.
WRECK AT CROSSING
One Killed
Morgan Brawner of Frankfort was
fatally injured and Dennis Polsgrove
seriously injured late Thursday,
March 9, when a Frankfort-Lexington
interurban car struck a buggy in
which the men were riding at Green
hill, two miles east of Frankfort.
The accident occurred during a
heavy rain and hail storm, as the
men, who were employed as guards
at the E. H. Taylor, Jr.. and com
pany distillery in Woodford county,
were on their way to work.
The buggy was wrecked but the
horse pulling it was not injured.
"THE CLAW WILL BE IN
LOUISVILLE
Shubert Theatre
Arthur Hopkins will present Lionel
Barrymore in "The Claw" at the Shu
bert Theatre, Louisville, March 21
and 22. This is the Henri Bernstein
play which, when produced in Paris,
helped to make the young French
dramatist's reputation. Mr. Barry
more has been playing the piece in
New York and Boston since last Sep
tember. Appearing with him are
Irene Fenwick, Doris Rankin, Marie
Bru(e, Giorgio Majeroni, Charles
Kennedy, E. J. Ballantine and the en
tire New York company. The play
was directed by Mr. Hopkins.
CRUDE STILL FOUND ACROSS
FROM FORD
The crudest sort of still waa dis
covered across the river on the Madi
son county side from Ford by Deputy
Sheriffs Franklin and Richard O.
Moberly Saturday. The officers say
they found it at the home of Mack
Montgomery on the Tuck Bush place.
Montgomery was taken in charge and
will have opportunity to explain how
it happened to be there before County
Judge J. D. Goodloe in court Tues
day. The officers say there was no
"regular" worm but two long Iron
pipes used aa such. The whole th'nc
waa very crude. Montgomery gave
$1,000 bond for bis appearance with
B. Current as surety. Richmond
Register.
World News
By. J. R, Robertson, Professor of
History and Political Science
Berea College
The attention of England is turn
ing toward the Budget, which cornea
before the House of Commons in
April. England has the most perfect
Budget system in the world. Every
thing la ao arranged and classified
that there can be no misunderstand
ing. There ia no chance for expen
ditures or receipts to be covered up.
Moreover, the House is exacting n
its requirement that there shall not
be a deficit A surplus is always ex
pected which shall apply on the Na
tional debt A failure to ratify in the
House may lead to a resignation of
the Cabinet The Budcret consists of
a report for the past year and an es
timate of receipts and expenditures for
the coming year. England depends
upon the income tax and a tariff on a
few articles, not produced in England,
for her revenue. In rase more ia
needed, the rate is raised, and some
times it ir reduced, if the expendi
tures fail for any reason. Even dur
ing war times England's Budget was
wonderfully managed.
Conditions in India are causing dis
turbances in the English Cabinet
Because of the publication of an of
fical document without the consent of
the whole cabinet the Secretary from
India, Mr. Montague, has been re
buked and in return has resigned bis
position. In harmony with the Vice
roy, Lord Reading, be was favorable
to a more moderate policy than that
favored by the Prime Minister. The
resignation of a cabinet minister
alone is rather an unusual event in
England, as the cabinet always acts
as a whole. In the meantime more
drastic measures are being adopted
in India. The leader of the move
ment of discontent Ghandi, has been
arrested, and the future policy will
be determined by the effect this will
have. The Crown Prince is still in
India and hopes to arouse the loyalty
the people. He has been well
treated thus far. i
The Armament Committee of the
League of Nations has taken an active
part in the disarmament movement in
Europe. They have devised a plan
which allows to the various nations
a certain number of units for their
land forces, according to their respec
tive needs. A unit is thirty thousand
men. By this means a total army for
Europe would be 1,380,000 men, or
about BO percent of the present force.
This is an adaptation of the principle
used at the Washington Conference.
The League of Nations is willing to
support any movement that will se
cure the desired result or it will take
the matter up at its next meeting in
Geneva, in the summer, if .that is de
sired. On account of the uncertainty
of a conference at Genoa, it is not
improbable that the services of the
League may be aought The U. S
refusal to be present at Genoa has
lessened the interest in that meeting,
and Lloyd George has disavowed his
purpose of proposing a disarmament
plan which, it is believed, he had in
mind.
An order has been issued by the
Minister of the Interior in Germany
for the destruction and suppression of
all imperial Insignia. This will in
clude pictures, statues, ensigns, and
such other things as call to mind the
empire. It includes pictures and sta
tues of the late Emperor and his fam
ily. An exception to this wholesale
destruction is made in the case of
pictures, statues or emblems that are
part of a general design which would
be injured by such removal. The late
emperor was very fond of such in
signia and the empire was full of
them. They constituted one means
of creating loyalty. It is to be hoped
that this may not be carried to the
extreme of an iconoclastic movement
that will do away with monuments
which are a real part of the histori
cal development of the German Em
pire as a united state, for in spite of
abuse, that was an achievement worth
while.
Discussion of the Four Power Pact
ia going on in the Senate. Mr. Un
derwood seems to be acting as leader.
He is at some disadvantage as he wss
not present in ths conference when
the treaty was being discussed, hav
ing been called home by sickness.
The Senators have been discussing,
so far, the origin of the treaty; trying
to determine whether the U. S. led
out in the making or England and
(Continued on Page Eight)

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