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The citizen. (Berea, Ky.) 1899-1958, March 16, 1922, Image 5

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Muck II, 1922
Page Five
THE CITIZEN
A non-f iMiMn family ntwipap" pvklUhd tvary Thursday by
BKREA PUBLISHING CO. Oncer par ad)
MARSHALL t. VAtJUHM. BUr JAMM M RE1NHARDT, Manasinc Miter
BatorWl
l Ik uffn Mm, By., m i,na rtaM mail matter.
mtmcKirnoN mtm
Om yaw, II. t, snath, N mil; tkrar MnUit, M rmt. PstsM t atfMnr.
Par Aavarttaliw tmmu The Aawrtraa fiM AmrlatfMi.
The Soldier Bonus Again
In another column of this ixtue wit) be found a very interest
inr letter containing the reaction of an e-ervice man on our
recent "Soldier Bonus" editorial.
Sentiment and sympathy arc very largely on the aide of the
author of thin letter. There is no room for argument when you
begin to make comparisons between the soldier and the slacker,
between the soldier and the profiteer, or between the soldier and
the war-made millionaire. ' No one would be farther from depriv
ing m soldier of his dues than The Citizen. We cannot alto
gether subscribe to the opinion that Germany would have won the
war I1S1I r Mated nut. We bilitvr too fumly in the fnal
reign of Justice to believe that the wrong side of this conflict
would have finally triumphed, but that opinion does not lessen
the debt of grst:tude which we owe the American soldier for
entering this conflict and bringing it to a close in the speediest
' way possible.
The whle argument from our viewpoint resolves Itself to a
principle of remunerating able bodied men because they were un
able to join the campaign of graft and greed that many men
who stayed home were able to do. It is true that thousands of
ex-service men are today without work. It is al true that
more men who were not in the army are cut of work than those
who served in the army. If we are to remunerate people who
lost their jobs, we must remunerate thousands who did not serve
in the war. As we view it, the whole principle of the Soldier
Bonus is being fought on improper grounds. We deplore the
methods of some employers who try to coerce their soldier em
ployes into writing letter to Congressmen to defeat the bill.
Such an art is ignoble and not worthy of good American citizens.
Likewise, we believe it is unfortunate for the soldier to take the
view that the average American citizen is ungrateful and un
appreciative if he does not subscribe to the Bonus as a sound
economic business principle; as a worthy act of the American
government! and as a debt that every citizen owes the ex-soldier.
If wounded or disabled soldiers have not been cared for by the
government, it is absolutely shameful, and every citizen should
make it a pint to see that his Congressman or some authori
tative person is apprized of the existence and condition of any
disabled soliiier who is not being cared for, but let us as able
bodied, aggressive yung men who are much wiser by our ex
perience in the army, get our hold upon life thru the avenues
that are open to all progressive, fightinff young men and not
rely upon the Soldier Bonus as our mesns of salvation.
Vessels Are the Messengers, the Servants and
the Builders of Trade
f
4
By E. C. PLUMMER, U. S. Shipping Board Commissioner.
Vessels are the messengers, the servants and the
builders of trade. They are almost as essential to toe
pror development of markets for American goods in
to Cj toreign land as it me present or the goods themselves.
, " Ships as an adjunct of trade with couutrici beyond teas
are prirelops.
Congress, by pawing the .lone law. came to the
understanding how war deHo. incuts had made the
I 4 I services of American vessel in the foreign trade of thi
M XaI 0o"n,r absolutely essential to our continued prosper
JtrwimlAM j An a,dtvjunte fleet of American nhips would in its
mere oierntin create new and well-paid indtMry which would give di
rect employment to ten of thousands of men snd pay to our own people
the millions upon millions of dollars which otherwise go out of tins coun
try to enrich other nations. A great fleet nf ocean-going vessel would
give direct employment to tent of thousands of men in our shipyards and
repair dok.
Hut the dominating fact which brings home a realization of the truth
that our ships must remain on the sea is the fact that the people of this
twin try have so increased their production that they have vust surpluses
which must find markets in foreign lands or millions of people in this
(Ountry will have their opportunities to produce and earn crippled or
degt roved.
It is the unsold surplus that closes the factory door, that cuts off the
weekly pay check, that sends men into the street hunting for work.
Yet those direct benefits coming from American ships constitute but
one feature of thit national problem. Every cargo of coal, grain, manu
factured goods, fruits, tent abroad, not only brings to our own people its
equivalent in money or value, but it also furnishes an opportunity for our
people to produce another cargo to replace that which has been sent abroad,
and thus it gives additional employment both to home labor and home
capital.
If there's an thing aa Amertcnn j
screen star mn'l understand. It's the j
news that the I'rlncaaa Kmnianuels I
Flgnstelll hs lei;un proceeding In
France to pretetit the ptihllr display
of her portrait.
A school iierintenilent tell parents
that the) should . to -rutit their
children to he mil un all night parties.
How different from when grandfather
and grandmother were children Then,
parents did irnl hate to he tdd that.
A movement to in ike a national park
on the site of Mammoth cine Is under
way. For once It kceui legitimate for
the goternineut to purchase a hole In
the ground.
I'arla Is so f ir off that If Is doubt
fill If that nonhitmg Ilea that hsi
been tie. e lopetl hy a Krench s U-ntil
can be distributed In time to do Tow
aer much good this coming summer.
Nothing hn heen heard for a couple
of days from the fellow who ha been
contending that we haven't any more
nf the old fnsbloned mot hers w ho ran
make hrend.
BREATHITT COl'NTVS FIKST
WARRANT
The following is a copy of the first
warrant issued in Breathitt county,
and it deserves rommemlationn for
its inclusiveness. The criminal who
could escape this warrant on the
ground of technicality or insufficiency
will have to invent excuses that are
yet unknown. This is not a bad war
rant, and except for the misspelling
is a good pattern for present day
warrants:
BREATHITT COUNTY. KY.
STATK OF JF.TT'S CRKEK,
I, Jackson Terry, Hi official Mag
istrate, Squire and Justice of the
Peace, do hereby isu the following rit
against Henderson Harri. charging
him with assnlt and battery and
breach nf the pece on his brutherin
law, Tm Fox by name; this wamt
ruses him of kick in, bitin, and
acratrhfin an thnm rocks ann doin
evcrthing that wus mean and con
trary to the law in the state of Jett't
Creek and uforesed. This warnt
otharisoa the hi constable, Mils
Terry by name, to go forthwith an
forthcomin and 'rest the sed Hender
son Harris and bring him to be delt
with arcordin t the law of Jett's
Creek and aforeted. This warnt
otharises the hi constable to take him
wher he finds him on the hil tide as
wel as in the level, to tak him wher
he aint at wel aa wher he it an
bring him to be delt with arcordin
to the lawa of Jett't Creek an afore
ted. Jtnary the 2, 1838,
HI constable. Magistrate an Squire
an Justice of the pece of the
state of Jett't Creek aforeted
The project, which was widely dis
cussed before the war, of rutting a
canal serosa Scot lend from the Clyde
to the Forth, Is again under discussion.
The existing small anal will probably
be utilised by widening It to take
ocean going craft. The projected
canal would rut eighteen hours off the
Journey hy sea from London to Glas
gow, and it would put I.lverool, Bel
fast, and tilasgow In direct touch with
Midland, tiermany. and ' Scandinavia.
The canal would be seven years la
construction snd would cost approxi
mately f i.m.ism.uin.
MRS. SALLIE A. BAKER
"Our loss was heaven's gain when
on March third at 11:45 the Death
Angel entered and carried away the
spirit of Mrs. Sallie A. Baker.
Mrs. Baker was born 82 years ago,
near College Hill, in Madison county,
and later moved to Jackson county.
Shortly after the close of the Civil
War she was married to Wansley
Baker, and in 18U7 they came to Be
rea. The following year Mr. Baker
passed to the other side and she has
lived here ever since with her chil
dren. At the age of 13 she united with
the Baptist church, and for the post
6T1 years she has lived her Christian
ity, as those who knew her well can
te.stify. She was very conscientious
in htw tithing and gave help quietly
where she felt it was most needed.
She so lived that near the end when
a daughter aked if there was any
thing in the way she serenely smiled
and said, "My way is clear as far as
I know." Some time ago she had
written a letter to her children to be
rend after she was gone and telling
them what to do.
Altho for several years she has
been an invalid, there was never a
word f complaint, but she continued
brave and cheerful to the last.
Mrs. Baker was the mother of eight
daughters and one ton, all of whom
were with her except Mrs. Lauri
Washburn, and Mrt. Engle, of Jack
ton county, who were kept away by
illness.
Her gentle life is not ended, for its
influence will ever live on In the
hearts of all those who associated
with her.
TAX COLLECTOR'S SALE OF
PROPERTY FOR GRADED
SCHOOL, CITY. AND
TARVIA TAX
1920-21
Notice it hereby given that I will
on Saturday, April 1, 1922, at the
Post Office door in Berea, Ky., at
2:00 p. m , expose to public tale for
cash in hand the following described
property or to much thereof as may!
be necessary to pay tarvia, city and
graded school taxes due thereon and
unpaid and the penalty, interest and
cost thereon for 1920-21.
Graded School Tax 1920
Albin, Annie Fay, lot $ 5.27
Ambrose, Frank, lot 5.61
Ambrose, Jno. W., lot 5.27
Botkins, Dooley Welch, lot .. 21.76
Coyle, Addie, lot 6.60
Pemmon, Mrs. Fannie, lot..,. 8.20
Evans, Mrs. Mary 5.61
Golden. Hardin, lot 11.66
Herd, Cora B., lot 13.64
Harris, William B., Jr 3.42
Jones, Catherine, lot 5.26
Little. Jas. R., land 9.14
Lunsford, Jno. M., lot 4.94
Moore, Lillie, lot 8.20
Shupe, Josephine, lot 6.07
Graded School Tax 1921
Abner, W. M lot '.17
Abney, Arch, lot 7.17
Bridges, J. R., barber shop fix. 8.43
Baker, Mrs. Jane, lot V.2
Coyle, Addie, lot 6.22
Cartwright. R. L., lot 2.38
Castle, W. H 3.42
Cochran, W. E 3 42
Cornelius. Dr. P., lot 2.50
Field John 3.42
Frost. Albert 3.42
Coocey, Albert, lot 7.17
Gott, J. E 3.J2
Harris, Wm. B., Jr 3.4
Jones, Mrs. Minervia, lot ... . 812
Johnson, A. B 3.42
Little, Jas. R personal prop... 3 80
Lambert. Joe, lot 5.30
Logan, Hugh 3 42
Lunsford, G. W 3.42
Olmstead, Arthur D., per. prop. 6.09
Patrick, Pleas, per. prop 8.10
Peters. R. B., rer. prop 5.49
Panne!!, Mrs. J. F., per. prop... 8.14
Rolinson, Walter G 3.42
Robinson, A. B 3.42
Rutherford, Rufus .' 3.42
Riddle. F. E 3.42
Scott. Winfield 3 42
Settle, George, lot 5.06
VanWinkle, J. W 3.42
Wren, Walter, lot 6.22
Walker. G. W 3.42
Walker, Grant 3.42
Jarvis, W. S 3.42
Waltzer, Joe 3.42
Vernon, J. A 3.42
Moore, R. M. 3.42
City Tax 1921
Baxter, Stella, lot
Bridget, J. R., barber shop fix.
Carpenter, A. C, lot
Cartwright, R. L., lot
Castle, W. H
Cochran, W. E
Cook, Robert
Cornelius, Dr. P., lot
Fields, John
Frost, Albert
Goocey, Chester, lot
Gott, J. E
Hayes, Gran, per. prop
Herd, Cora B., lot
Hughes, W. N., lot
Jarvis, W. S
Johnson, A. B
Lakes, John, lota
Lambert, Joe S., lot
Logan, Hugh
Lunsford, G. N
Maupin, Frank, per. prop
Muncy, Simon, per. prop
Olmstead, Arthur D., per. prop.
Osborne, C. E
Patrick, Pleas, per. prop
Pannell, Mrs. J. F., per. prop.
Peters, R. B., per. prop
Pullins, Luther (col.)
Riddle, F. E
Rutherford, Rufus
Robinson, A. B
VanWinkle, J. W
Walker, Grant
Walker, G. W
Walker, John (col.)
Waltzer, Joe
White, Mary (col.), lot
Wyatt, U. S., Jr
Wylie, Waldo
Vernon, J. A
Moore, R. M
2.46
8.57
3.25
2.38
3.42
3.42
3.42
2.50
3.42,
3.42
5.82
3.42
3.94
3.42
3.63;
3.42
3.42
13.14
5.30
3.42
3.42
6.22
13.20
5.09
3.42
8.10
8.14
5.49
3.42
3.42
3.42
3.42
3.42
3.42
3.42
3.42
3.42
19.25
3.42
3.42
3.42
3.42
Tarvia Tax 1921
Corwiin, Miss E. K., lot .... 16 08 1
Hicks, Jack, lot 7.31
Gabbard. M. H., lot 10.22
White, Mary (col.), lot 25.56
Pennington, H. C, lot 1166
Combs, Henry, lot 8.36
Cruse, M. G., lot 8.86
Tatum, Mrs. W. J., lot 11.73
Berea Cemetery, unsold lota .. 93.12
E. L. FEESE,
Tax Collector
O. L. Gabbard, Auctioneer
Had to Be Sharp.
"Bill why did the speaker make
such pointed remarks?"
H.'d 10. o get 1 ! meaning through
their heads. I ail ;,os ."
CARD OF THANKS
We wish to express our sincere
thanks for the kind thoughtfulnest
of the neighbor! and frienda of our
mother, Mrt. Sallie A. Baker. Es
pecially do we thank the Masonic Or
der for the loan of their chair dur
ing her illness, and friends for the
flowers and many deeds of kindnett.
Mrt. Alma Watts
Mrt. Nellie Click
Mrt. Silaa Shearer
II. T. Baker
Mrt. Maggie Engle
Mrt. Mary Hale
OF SPECIAL INTEREST TO
COLORED PEOPLE
Patrich Campbell, Gilbert Dudley
and William Titua attended a Mason
ic entertainment in Richmond Sunday.
Mrt. Sarild.-i Dudley hat returned
1 from Madiaonville, O., where the en
joyed a pleasant visit with friends
and relatives.
City Tat 1920
Ambrose, J. L. 3.42
Ambrose, J. W lot 1.62
Creech. Jno. W 8.42
French, Press, lot 1.62
Green, S. D 8.42
Johnson, A. B 3 42
Johnson, Wash 8 42
Kindred. G. W 8.42
McGuire, M. B., lot 7.35
Moure, Jas. L. 3.42
MJes, John 3.42
Moore, R. M 3.42
Titus, Myrtle (col.), lot 6 24
Willis, llowaid 3.42
MRS. ELIZA EASLEY PASSES
AWAY
Mrs. Eliza Easley, a well known
citizen of thit community, departed
thit life March 13, 1922. She was
a fuithful Christian, always willing
to do everything assigned to her in
church work. She wat dearly loved
by all who knew her. She leavea a
host of friends and relatives to mourn
her lota.
Mist Elizabeth Miller la able to be
out again, after a eevere attack of
pneumonia.
stiff
Frack of Caatea Crape Frock of Taffeta
"Korrect" Dresses of
Inspirational Styling
IJ ERE are frocks that present the
latest caprice of -fashion yet
carry with them that air of restraint
that suggests the really well dressed
woman.
Tailored as carefully as they
are styled gracefully in fab
rics of dependable service.
The Fashion Store
succeeding
THE J. B. FISH COMPANY
Iff who possesses me will be well fed
Thrift
Every Member of the Family
will receive equal consideration in this bank
from the tot of tender years to "grandma and
grandpa" we make no distinction in the
ages of individuals or the amount of the ac
count in our Interest Department. Our In
terest, on Savings and your Interest in Sav
ings stimulates everywhere.
ONE DOLLAR OPENS AN
ACCOUNT v
Berea Bank C& Trust Co.
MAIN STREET
BEREA, KY.
LILY WHITE FLOUR
Better than ever. It bakes everything
KENTUCKY CORN MEAL
Best on the market. Always tresh. Sold at reasonable
prices and guaranteed by all grocers
MANUFACTURED AT HOME
Berea Milling Company
BEREA
KENTUCKY
DRY-CLEANING, PRESSING, REPAIRING,
HAT BLOCKING
We do the right kind of work at the right price
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
W Call For and Deliver
NEW WAY CLEANING CLUB
Short Street, Berea, Ky. Phone 125-2
Mitt Texie Warford and Mita May.
me D. Warford were the guests of
Mist Glendon Reynolds and Mist
Winnie Campbell, Sunday afternoon.
Mrt. Alice Elmore ia very ill.
Servicee were held at the A. M. E.
Church Sunday by Rev. Straus. A
arge attendance, alto a good collec
tion Mrt. Elixa Herron Easley hat re
turned from a visit in LouUville.
Mrt. Emma Turner and Mrt. Sar
ah Blythe were the guests of Miaa
Mattie Lee White, Tuesday afternoon.
Friends are glad to know Howard
Ballard, who hat been ill for several
weeks, ia improving nicely.
The church aid society met at the
residence of Mrt. Ada Bush. A Urge
number of members were preaent

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