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The citizen. [volume] (Berea, Ky.) 1899-1958, October 05, 1922, Image 1

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BEREA PUBLISWNG CO.
MARSHALL K. VAUCHN.
IAMB . UWNAWT
afts" Kwt eaesSajaajaJ
Vol. XXIV.
NAVY IS UNDER
FORCED DRAFT
Work Is Rushed to Get Destroy
er! Out of Norfolk
Yards.
MOVE CONSIDERED MYSTERY
ellef Orewe at Wsshlngten That
ending f American Snipe to Con
" ' etantinopl I Not a Relief
Mission Alone.
."'' .
. London, Sept. 80. A number of
American destroyer la European wa
ters have been ordered to proceed to
the Near Kat to augment the present
American fleet. consisting of right de
stroyer, two oubmarloe chancre and
the yacht Scorpion, all operating In
the eastern Mediterranean water and
the Black mm. It was authoritatively
learned.
- Washington. Bept 80. The nary
worked ander forced draft to ret two
divisions of destroyers cleared from
Norfolk for Constantinople.
No official explanation waa forth
comlog from the 8tate or Navy de
part mrnt aa to why thla particular
type of warahlpo baa beea eelected.
la the abeeoce of such tnformatloa
It waa recalled that only two dare afo
Secretary of State Hughes expre sd
sympathy with the BrttUb demaado
that the Turklah ttralU be kept opes,
Thla government win laalat that thla
water gateway be kept free for world
commerce, bo eeld.
ComewBtlny oe thla phaee of the lt
Ballon, eiperti oald that deatroyera
would be saost useful for luck work
If the United States navy la to bo
loaned for thla purpose.
Amerteane Not In ' PeetC
It waa alsslflcantly pointed oat that
not one report of dange to American
Ufa or property had emanated from
OocjtajitlBopJe. where the 22 Onited
States warahlpo bare been ordered.
The port la reported to bo opea and or
derly. w Ita vessels going to and fro.
Competent government legal author
ity dealer Uat -tasaro.lnotaissg
any vt di liuilthtioa of ansa men ta or
other treatlea which demands tbat the
United State act with the allies.
On the contrary, there la a treaty
with Turkey, under date of 1880, that
eipreaaly forbids (he sending of Unit
ed States war vessels to the Darda
nelles. Thla treaty la atlll In force
fend la the more binding because this
country baa never declared war on
Turkey. It waa pointed out. Turkey,
for Us part, guarantee protect loo to
American merchant vessels.
Aa evidence of the good faith of
Turkey in this connection. Secretary
Hughes ouly a few days ago an
nounced that, at tbe Instance of this
government. Kernel bad permitted ten
Urvek ships to remove refugees from
Smyrna.
Tbe opinion grows tbat the State
department, or the American commie
alotier st Constantinople, either
throuitb design or accident, baa aided
tbe British, wbo liav sent a 48-hour
ultimatum to Keuial. It waa pointed
out tbat Qreat Britain le the only
military opponent of the Kemallata
and tbat nothing could benefit Great
Britain more than tbe eipressed sup
port and backlug of the State depart
ment No Speclflo Order.
Experts pointed out significantly
that tbe unusual activity of the United
States followed tbe return to Washing
ton of the British ambassador. Sir
Auckland tied ilea, a few days ago.
The ouly conditions under which the
I'ulted States may be permitted to
have battleships In tbe Dardanelles Is
when tbe allies sre there In force. It
was said As this government has
never spproved the treaties made with
Turkey by the alllea following the
World war, her ships have no legal
status there uow. International ex
pert declared.
No tiIic orders have been Usued
fur the conduct of the destroyer fleet
once It reaches Constantinople. Jt Is
to be put st tbe disposal of Hear Ad
uilrul llristol, high rtaumlssioiier at
I'liiiktuutliiople. lli status la de
scrlled as more diplomatic tliau mili
tary. He lias wide latitude to employ the
ships ss he sees hi lu his cable to
the Navy department be requested that
the destroyers be fully provisioned,
with fuel and luunltlous prepared to
meet any emergency.
Greek Cabinet
Athens After an all-night session
the ltevoliintionury Committee decid
ed to submit to King George the
names of a Cabinet, with Alexander
Zaluiis aa Premier snd M. Polltls us
MlnUter of Foreign A m airs. M Poll
tls held tbe foreign portfolio under
Venlielos. For Minister of War the
committee selected (lenerul fhara
lamfiis, and for Minister of the Navy
Admiral Paachrtstou. Both these of
ficers aere removed from the active
lUt hy recent Uov eminent.
Devoted to
Five cent Per Copy
GOAL REGULATION
TARGET OF ATTACK
OPfRATORS AND SRICULATORS
REPORTED IN NATION WIDE
CAMPAIGN
Buck At Efforts Of The Government
te Pis SoCallsd "Pair Prices," It
Report Would Remain Pree to Plx
Own Prices.
Columbus. According to reports In
circulation among Ohio con I operators,
the drive a in Inst attempted Interfer
ence with the coal business will lie
national rather than state-wide. In
scie. The story, which swears to
bsro confirmstory evidence back of
It. Is thst the National Ccal Associa
tion, wltb headquarter In ' Washing
ton, plans to attack Federal legislation
applicable to the mining industry. In
conjunction wltb a drive of state forces
upon the Ohio law.
There lo anotlier version to the af
fect that the move will be made Jointly
against all leglslsilon Interfering with
the coal Industry.
Tbe Federal Government gsvo no
piice-flxlng power to Ita fuel adminis
trator. It la true Herbert C IlooVrr,
Secretary of Commerce, attempted to
fix so-called "fair prices," bnt coat
operator proved themselves to he too
strong. They boosted the price before
they started for Washington to meet
Mr. Hoover and Increased It again
whoa they returned. They aseert that
the Hoover price now are almost for
gotten and that no further attention
will be given to them.
It was announced at the Governor's
office that there would be a conference
at the Executive mansion to be s fr
iended by C J. Neal, Ohio Fuel Ad
ministrator; Attorney-General John O.
Price, and, Percy Tetlow, Director of
the Department of Industrial Rela
tions. Price for Ohio coal are expected
to he announced soon after this con
ference. VOICE SPANS ATLANTIC
Seng And Orchestra Prom Newark, N.
J. Radio Station Heard In London
Newark, N. J. Officials of radio ata
tloo W. O. K. here, announced receipt
of a wlrrleaa message declaring that
the voice of a woman singing and the
fpttlna nf Mil nr,h0ittrs ttlMt Were
broadcast from Newark In an attempt"
at trans A'lantlc communication oad
been heard in l-ondoa.
A message sent broadcast by Sir
Thomas Upton did not carry across
tbe ocean, however, the london mes
sage mentioning only the music strains
snd the woman voice. Sir Thomas,
It was announced, will make a second
sttempt.
OttlclHls st station W. O. It. declare
that this I the first time actual radio
communication lias been broadcast
across the Atlantic.
The following wireless message wss
received from lnlon :
"Large crowds in l-ondon awaited
results of radio tests. Great Inter
ference from ships' spurklng. Heard
your test music and woman singing."
Obersmmergua Quiet Again
oners mmcrk-sii Her Passion Play
ended, her crowds of tourists gone
and her shops wild ttare of souvenirs
(tberamiuergnu hit sliped back into
another decade f peace anil quiet.
Approximately .t 1 "..( visitors came
to see tbe Pitssion Play this season
and left millions of marks, which tbe
village will devote to improvement
purposes. The gross receipts of the
plsy were ,.ii marks, sale of
books and photographs netting 4.lkN,.
NP0 more. In sdd'tion other millions
were spent In -llluge shops and
restaurants
BANDIT RAISULI SURRENDERS
Announcement by Spain Recalls Frio
tion With United States
in 1004.
Hun MeliSHtlaii, Spulu, Kept. ;. Se
ll or I'ridii. Spanish foreign minister,
otllclully Hiiiioiinivd Hie surrender of
ItnlHull, the bttiidlt.
(Kulsull, otherwise Multtl Ahmed
ItulMull. bus glveo more thai. -10 years
of bis life In brigandage and Is con
sidered "the greatest robber" In all
Morocco He lias oH-rated within H
miles of Tangier in recent years. The
Incident thai gave halsul! most not or!
ety was his kidnaping lu 11)14 of an
American citizen Han It. Perdlcarta
and his aon-lti-law. Cromwell Vsrley.
British subject. The sultan of Mo
rocco, who feared the bandit, but
feared still more the power of the
Cnlted States paid the ransom
Bankroll Tied Up
New York Attachment of fund
carried In four New York banks to
the credit of Hugo Btlnnes. German
Industrial magnate, In connection with
a fXUKMSS breach of contract suit
tiled by Jamee A. Tillman, promoter,
revealed that Stlnnes through various
Unsocial plana had made attempt to
float loans for hundreds of millions
of dollar In the United States. The
attachment order, signed by Suprtme
Court Justice Waaservogel, wa placed
la effect by lepuiies to Sheriff Na
gle, of New York t'ounty.
The Citizen
ttie Interests
BEREA, MADISON COUNTY,
. i '. . ',. 1
v t'tan ii.i si. .a.' ...
lJIJZZl -feren of bov nren,, JJ","
N C when Daniel Carter Beard, nntldnsl commissioner. presented with gold eH,'le badge. S-Oirl. of
Jackson. Cel.. laying flower on cofllns Ot victims of the Argonaut mine dlssster.
ROAD WORKING FOR KNOTT
COUNTY
1,000 Men, Weaken and Children Torn
Oat With Working Took
It is estimated that nt least 8,000
men and women and children worked
the public roads, In every aectioo of
Knott county, on Thursday and Fit-
day, September 28 and 29.
The public school had boon closed
by order of the County Superintend
ent of Schools. Everybody In '
school district waa naked to report
at the school house with road wott
ing tool.
In many places, drain were built;
ledge blasted out; mountains levelled
to a gradual slope. Tha work was
scientifically don under overelght.
Many women, unused to this kind'
..... ..... a aw I
of work, oiitterea tnmt iimnam, fionti
of the school giria prepared5 lunch
ebstltoe U" U Wlta-eder ee
save time and get more work done.'
It was a splendid demonstration of
a united county. A prixe of fifty dol
lars will be awarded to the school
district that made the beet stretch
of road.
"FORGET-ME-NOT DAY." SATUR
DAY, NOVEMBER 4
Movement to Care for Neglected Vets
of World War
Cincinnati, O., Sept 29. A great
national movement to provide Amer
ica's wounded and disabled veterans
of the great war in every large com
munity with adequate club-quarterj
and meeting-places is one of the ob
jects of the "National Forget-Me-Not
Day," to be observed thruout the
United State on Saturday, Novem
ber 4th. Raymond A. Lasance, Na
tional Adjutant of the Disab'cd
American Veterans of the World
War, under whose auspices "Forgct-Me-Not
Day" is to be held in every
city and town in the country on No
vember 4th, presented statistics at
the organixation'a national headquar
ters here today, showing the need for
the disabled vets, where they may as
semble and discuss their life prob
lems, which were given a new com
plexion as a result of wounds and in
juries sustained by them in action
during the World War. The estab
lishment of employment and place
ment centers, where business inter
ects and veterans can join hands in
the campaign to place the trained
disabled men in civilian life positions,
was urged by Lasance; and he rec-cmmi-mled
that Disabled American
Veterans' chapters endeavor to pro
vide summer camps and vacation
spots for their members and "bud
dies,- the " Forget- Me-Not
Day '
campaign in the various communl-
ties to establish foundations for such
activities.
Assurance of hearty support and
solid cooperation for the "Forget-Me-Not
Day" movement of Novem
ber 4th was pledged in great num
bers of telegraphic messages receiv
ed at the Disabled American Veter
an a' National Headquarters here,
from Governors and Mayor in every
part of the United States. Close to
one thousand civic heada have an
nounced the appointment of Citiiena'
Committees to direct the day's activ
ities in their comaiunlties, and sev
eral hundred more have Indicated
that Committees will be named in
early October, to plan for "Forget -
Me-Not Day."
of tlie Affoioxitaln UPeo'ple
KENTUCKY, OCTOBER 6, 1922
vi... m rtdcairo. snd
CLAYHOLE CASES FILED IN
' COURT OF APPEALS
Petition Claims That Lower Court
Refused Evidence
Frankfort, Ky., Oct. 2. The Clay
hole er.ees involving election troubles
in Breathitt county were brought to
the court of appeals today on appeals
of French Combs, Shade Combs, Les
lie Combs and Georjre Allen, Jr.,
from the Judgment of the Boyd cir
cuit court, where the men were tried
on a change of venue.
The men were indicted and con
victed of the murder of George Mc-
Intoah, during- a battle at the Clay-
hole voting place at the election last
November. French Combs and Shade
Combs were given five years each
and (eslie Combs and Allen 15 years
i ta.a.: .
m rt pv.meu.mry.
TlrJ petltiori. for a reversal of the
jTuigrhent states that the lower court
refused to permit evidence ehowin
that Will Carpenter and others, who
were present on the election grounds,
came into the election booth and took
the poll books from it to the river,
where they were mutilated and
thrown into the Tiver; that the ver
dict was the result of passion and
prejudice; charges failure to proper
ly instruct jury, admission of incom
petent evidence, and failure to adimt
competent evidence.
DEATH TAKES PROMINENT MAD
ISON COUNTY MAN
SUDDENLY
End is Shock to Host of Friends
Death laid its hands op Harvey
Chenault in Richmond Monday eve
ning as he sat in the home of his
neighbor, C. F. Higgins, on High
street, fistening with the family to
the music of the phonograph.
Mr. Chenault is survived by his
widow, Mrs. Mary Hume Chenault,
his mother, Mrs. T. D. Chenault, Sr.,
three sisters, Mrs. Nelson Prewitt
Gay. of Winchester, Mrs. Albert T.
McCown, of Madison county, and
Irs. Emerson Gwynne, of Baltimore,
Md., and two brothers, John D. Chen
ault, of Maysville, and T. D. Chen
ault, Jr., of Madison county.
Mr. Chenault waa one of the
wealthiest and most prominent citi
rens of this county. He wa a direc
tor in the State Bank and Trust com
pany and a deacon in the First Bap
tist church at the time of his death.
FUNERAL
SERVICES
TO BE
HELD
Couple Passed Away Week Ago
..I ir. n.1 f rm
, ,. ... . v
John II. Thonjpson 'H be preached!
Sunday, October 22 at 11 o'clock at
the home of J. A. Miracle, 4 miles
north of Berea on the place formerly
I known as the J. W. Herndon place.
Mrs. Thompson passed away on
July 6, 1922, and her husband fol-
lowed her on August 17.
The two gentlemen who will preach
are from Knoxville, Tenn. Friends
of the departed couple are invited
to thia service.
T. J.
McKEEHAN DIES
AT BIG
HILL
T. J. McKeehan, 62. of Big Hill.
Ky., died last week, after a lingering
illness from tuberculosis, and was
given a Masonic burial at Pilot cem
etery by the Berea Lodge No 617.
Mr. McKeehan was a Mason in spirit
and in truth. He wss master of the
Pilot Lodge at the time) of his death.
1 Funeral services were preached by
I Rev. H. H. Hudson, of Berea.
One Dollar and Fifty Cents Per Year
bogus money factory of big gang
of
FOOTBALL SCHEDULE
The following is a schedule of foot
ball games and practice hours for the
fall of 1922.
The Student Athletic Council for
mulated the schedule at the Y. M. C.
A. Building, September 27, 4:40 p.
m. Members present Athletic Di
rector, College, Normal, Vocational
representatives. Member absent
Foundation and Academy.
Due to the fact that there can be
only one pay event in the course of i
a week, the football game that was
scheduled foe November 20 will be
played November 27 as a pay game.
order of the Registrar as noted on
the College Calendar.
Game to be Played
Oct. 9. 2:00 p. m.
Academy vs. Vocational.
Oct. 16, 2:00 p. m.
College vs. Normal.
Oct 23, 2:00 p.m
College vs. Vocational.
Oct. 30. 2:00 p.m. '
Academy vs. Normal.
Nov. 6, 1:15 p. m.
Academy vs. College.
Nov. 6, 3:00 p. m.
Normal vs. Vocational.
Nov. 13. 1:15 p.m.
Academy vs. Vocational.
Nov. 13, 3:00 p. m.
College vs. Normal.
Nov. 20, Open day for back games,
if any.
Pay Games:
Nov. 27. 1:15 p. m.
College vs. Vocational.
Nov. 27, 3:00 p.m.
Academy vs. Normal.
Thanksgiving Day:
Nov. 30, 1:15 p. m.
Academy vs. College.
Nov. 30, 3:00 p. m.
Normal vs. Vocational.
All of the above scheduled games
will be played on the Main Athletic
Field.
Practice Hours
Monday morning Athletic Field
be marked.
to
Tuesday Normal ancf College
Main Athletic Field.
use
Wednesday Vocational uses Main
Athletic Field last two hours.
Thursday College uses Main Athlet
He Field last two hours,
. , x, . Mi Ati,iti'
Fnday-Normal uses Mam Athletuv
Field last two hours.
Saturday Academy uses Main Ath
letic Field last two hours.
Schedule authenticated and recor-
ded at Registrar' Office.
There will be no changes.
Teams not using Main Athletic
Field will shift for themselves as
best they can.
FROM DULUTII TO JACKSON
VILLE ON A WHEEL
925 Milea Covered In 14 Days
We had a chat with Homer Town-
send Tuesday morning. He is the
man who made hia way from Duluth, plana of its continuance. Anew
Minn., to Berea, Ky.. a distance of Parliament, or Dial Eirann, has just
925 miles, on an old fashioned Lowell cc me together, made up mostly of
Diamond bicycle in 14 days. supporters of the Free State. The
Homer is on his way to Jackson-' party of DeValera elected soma mam
ville, Fla., where he expects to teach bers, but so far only on haa ap
school, and says he must arrive there peared. The president of the body
before October 18, in order to win
role of 1250 which was
offered
him in Duluth providing
ha would
make the trip in SO daysat any
rate, this is his story.
Our Threefold Aim: To giva
the News of Berea and Vicinity;
To Reeonf the Happenings of
Berea Collar; To bo of Interest
to all the Mountain People.
No. 14
World News
J. R. Robertson, Professor
History and Political Science
Berea College
By
The third session of the Assembly
of the League of Nations has con
vened at Geneva. The president of
the meeting is a delegate from Chile,
notable as a statesman and interna
tional lawyer. One of the principal
measures to be considered is a plan
to create regional districts, within
which the nations concerned will seek
to enforce the League's decisions and
preserve peace. This is a modifica
tion, or successor, to the famous ar
ticle X, which met with objection in
the U. S. The League has not yet
given up hope of so amending the
covenant that the U. S. can enter.
The situation in the East makes this
n.eeting of peculiar significance anJ
leads men to wonder how much it
can do to prevent another war.
While most of the European coun
tries are either bankrupt or finding
it hard to meet their debts, Great
Britain is making headway in meet
ing her obligations. Her debt to the
U. S. is already funded, and she is
about to pay a large sum in the form
of interest. It was feared that the
disturbances in the East would delay
or prevent this payment, but suca
does not seem likely to be the case.
It is said that fifty millions of dol
lars are already in the United States
ready to be paid at the proper time.
Such financial ability following so
costly a war is unprecedented and is
something tha? inspires confidence.
Fir8t Pc ls Kive" the news col
to the victory of Mustapha Re
mal, the Nationalist leader of Tur
key, in Asia. He seems to be a
leader of ability, more practical
than Ghandi, of India, or Lenine, of
Russia. He is a representative of
the young Turkey, of which so much
was expected. Any entrance by the
Turks into the neutral zone across
from the straits of Dardanelles and
Bosphorus has been prohibited by
England, smA.1t ta fctWed the Allies
are supporting ner. snips at
control the coast, but cannot prevent
the outrages being perpetrated in the
interior. It is reported that the Sul
tan. Mohammed, has abdicated, and
that political changes are taking
place in Turkey, but to just what end
is not clearly reported.
The Greek defeat at Smyrna has
led to a revolution in Greece, and the
King, Constantine, has been sent
from the country. A new king is in
his place, and the authority is exer
cised by a Revolutionary Committee.
It is reported that Venetelos, the
ablest man in Greece, is to be
brought back to a place of leadership
in his country. Whether he is to be
made prime minister or appointed to
act as the spokesman before the Al
lies of his country is not known.
Perhaps both tasks will be put upon
him. The refugee King, Constan
tine, will not be likely to suffer, as
he has been getting ready for such
an emergency and haa large sums of
money invested in safe places.
The memoirs of the former Ger
man Kaiser are being published in a
large number of papera and are as
sured a wide circulation. Any light
that may be shed on the causes lead
ing to the recent war are to be wel
comed. The old emperor ought to
know a lot, if he cares to tell correct-
I i v vesical, itvr kiiutisi a a id i,iivhivii,
however, will have to stand the test
t.f severe criticism. One good re
sult of his effort, however, will be
the drawing out of other statements.
It is already known that Viviani, of
France, is dropping other duties that
he may devote his time to a reply to
the Kaiser. Like the memoirs of
Napoleon, written during his exile on
St. Helena the Kaiser's narrative
will be receiver! with a good deal of
allowance.
The recent death of Griffith and the
assassination of Collins in Ireland,
tho disheartening to ine irienua oi
the Free State, ha not checked the
a and acting head or Ireland, cos
to' grave, in a strong statmsnt declares
that an armed minority shall not
rule Ireland. He realise the danger
(Continued on page S)
. ..' '

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