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The Circle banner. [volume] (Circle, Mont.) 1914-1939, June 01, 1923, Image 7

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HE OWNED RICHEST
MINE OF ITS DAY
NATE VESTAL CAST GOLD BAR
OP 242 POUNDS WORTH $54,
202, AFTER SHORT RUN
Vestal Was the Man Wh» Developed
Famous Penobscot Property at
Marysville and Gave Thomas Ouse
Money to Open Drum Lnmmon.
About four years ago there died
in Oakland, California, a Montana
pioneer mining man whose name
was known the length and breadth
of the western states as the man
who owned the richest gold mine
in the world. The man was Nate
Vestal, and his mine was the fa
mens old Penobscot at Marysville
which produced from 35 feet of one
of its shafts the largest bar of gold
and silver bullion ever taken from
a single mine. This bar, cast from
the gold produced by a few weeks'
run, was 20 Inches long, several
inches wide and three and three
fourths Inches thick. It weighed
more than 242 pounds and its
value was $54,262.02.
The Helena Herald, commenting
on the production of the mine at the
time, said: "No other gold mine that
this or any other country has ever
known, has ever produced in the
same period, with similar working
facilities, so large an amount of
bullion.
obscot In 1878, the Alta California
said the largest bar from one mine
prior to this was $50,832 from Spring
Valley claim in Butte county, Cali
fornia, in 1877.
Staked Thomas Cruse
Nate Vestal was a shrewd mining
man, who knew ores and formations
better than most men. It was he
who gave Thomas Cruse the money
to operate the famous Drum Lummon
mine at Marysville, from which Cruse
afterward made millions,
drove an extremely sharp bargain
with Vestal, however, and as was
usually the case, the prospector and
discoverer of the mine made the
money while the man who put up the
cash to open up the property merely
received, a moderate return on the
money he Invested,
Vestal was not the discoverer of
the Penobscot, as is usually claimed,
but bought the property from the
original locators, who took up the
claims December 1, 1874.
Commenting on the Pen
Cruse
These
were W. R. Rader, one of the bro
thers after whom Radersburg is
named; J. B. Murphy, H. C. Nash,
and W. H. Murphy. Vestal purchas
ed the property from them for a
small sum in the fall of 1876. His
operations were successful from the
start, and after taking out about
$150,000, he sold the mine to the
Snowdrift and Penobscot Consolidat
ed Mining company, which took out
about $800,000 while they owned it.
In 1885 the Penobscot was sold to
John Longmaid, who took out $66,
000. Longmaid sold the mine to his
son, J. Henry Longmaid, who took
out $215,000. Altogether the mine
produced $1,230,000.
Vestal Boosts Helena
Back In the latter 70 's Vestal was
a popular man in Helena, when that
city was feeling blue and depressed
over the exodus of its mining men to
the Black Hills,
stuck and developed the Penobscot,
he encouraged many others to work
properties in the Marysville and in
other districts near Helena. It was
Because Vestal
Banish Engine Trouble!
»
'T'HE most powerful gaso
line on the market is made
from CAT CREEK crude, of
which we are producers, re
finers and marketers.
The lubricants obtained in
our modern refineries from
this high grade Montana crude
are especially adapted for use
in this rugged mountain
country.
We specialize in a correct
oil for every type of engine.
j
£
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I
A
I
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*41
4
4
I
jVtxjTUiix Oil Company
PRODUCERS ~ REFINERS ~ MARKETERS
OF MONTANA CRUDE
$75 in GOLD TO boy
OR GIRL FOR ESSAY
Seventy-five dollars in gold will be
paid to the Montana boy or girl, un
der 15 years of age, who writes the
best story, of from 50 to 150 words,
on the subject: "Why We Should
Buy a Studebaker." For the second
best story $25 will be paid and for
the third best $10. The offering is
made by Roy L. Diggs, manager of
the T. C. Power Motor Car company
of Helena.
Applicants who contemplate enter
ing this unique contest should apply
by letter to the T. C. Power Motor
Car company, Helena, Montana, be
fore June 16, and should mail stories
to the same address before July 15,
on which date the contest will
There is not a boy or girl In the
state who has not written dozens of
essays, on some given subject, in the
course of ordinary school work.
That is all this contest is. Get in
touch with some local Studebaker
car owner, and ascertain, through an
interview with him, of the nlerits of
the Studebaker car, write your story
or essay, and forward it to Helena.
also Vestal's money that opened the
Belmont and Whippoorwill at Em
pire, both good paying mines for sev
eral years.
Vestal's friends were legion, and
his purse strings were open to all who
needed assistance or charity,
open-heartedness soon dissipated his
fortune gained in the Penobscot, but
he went cheerfully to work to gain
another stake, being one of the first
miners to get into Alaska. He re
turned from Alaska with some money
and spent several years at Forest Hill
In California, on a property that he
had remembered from early days.
Later, his health failing, he made
his home at Oakland. He is sur
vived by his widow and two daugh
ters.
Hia
Many mining men believe that
Vestal's old mine, the Penobscot, has
many times more wealth stlllm in It
than ever has been taken out, and
that some day It will be worked prof
itably on a big scale again. Matt
W. Alderson of Butte, who has made
a thorough investigation and exam
ination of the property, says:
"The Penobscot is one of those
properties which has been stripped
of such pay ore as was in sight and
easily removed. The ore bodies in
this, as in most mines, are in shoots,
and the practice has been to mine
out such shoots until they plnch*^m
the bottom and sides and call the
property worked out, instead of do
ing development work ahead when
the mine is in profitable operation
to open up new territory. If, in some
places the veins pinched, no thought
was given to driving deeper to where
pay would come in again.
"This practice has not been con
fined to the Penobscot property. It
is the usual thing in Montana. As a
result, there is not a developed gold
mine In the state. We have develop
ed copper properties (in Butte, where
It is considered a sensible thing to
have ore in reserve), but we never
have developed a single gold mine."
With present day advantages of
mining, Mr. Alderson believes that
the old Penobscot could be made in
to a bigger producer than ever by the
expenditure of a reasonable sum on
development work.
MONTANA LEADING
IN WINTER WHEAT
IS FIRST, SAYS THOMAS CAMP
BELL, PREMIER WHEAT FAR
MER OF AMERICA
Has 30,000 Acres Planted to Wheat
on Crow Reservation; Premium on
Montana Grown Wheat Offsets
High Freight Rates.
Montana is the best winter wheat
country in the United States, accord
ing to Thomas D. Campbell, manager
of the Campbell Farming corpora
tion. Mr. Campbell also asserts that
the crop prospects for this year are
the best since 1918.
The Campbell corporation farms
30,000 acres on the Crow reserva
tion near Hardin. This year it has
20,000 acres in winter wheat and 10,
000 acres in spring wheat. The con
cern has been operating in Montana
for five years.
"Our success in Montana and our
confidence in the agricultural possi
bilities that exist here are perhaps
best illustrated by the fact that we
are renewing all of our five-year
leases which are just now expiring,"
said he. "We have proved to our
own satisfaction that wheat growing
here is less hazardous than in the
Red river country of North Dakota,
where my family has been engaged in
farming for 40 years.
Big Horn vs. Red River
"In Big Horn county, for instance,
we have an average annual precipi
tation of 15 1-2 inches with a very
small run-off because the rains come
and the snows melt at times when
the ground is not frozen and is in
condition to absorb the moisture. In
the Red river valley of North Dakota
the average annual precipitation is
from 20 to 22 inches with a run-off
of from four to five Inches. I am
not guessing at these figures, they
are state records.
"About two Inches of the Red
river country's rain comes in the fall
just at a time when it interferes with
harvesting. Your grain sprouts in
the bundle, in the shock and in the
stack and you have to get out and
turn it and oftentimes your wheat is
injured to such an extent that it falls
below all grades in marketing. In
Montana when we start to harvest
we know that we are going to be able
to finish the job, and when we get
through our wheat is the highest in
gluten content of any that reaches
the Minneapolis market with the ex
ception of Manitoba wheat. And in
future years the price of wheat is
going to be based largely on the glu
ten content, which represents milling
value. Our Montana wheat brings
a premium in the Minneapolis market
which offsets to a large extent the
handicap of greater freight rates
which operates to our disadvantage.
Drought Unprecedented
"Our drought years in Montana
were unprecedented. Drought had
not occurred before in 40 years and
perhaps will never occur again. All
we want is a normal rainfall. More
than that is a disadvantage because
it interferes with seasonal farm
work. But we have proved beyond
all doubt that we can raise In Mon
tana in a two-year period with con
servation of moisture, more and bet
ter wheat than can be grown in any
other section of the United States,
despite the difference in precipita
tion."
The Campbell corporation grows
WOULD YOU LIVE ?
'WARE POISON CUP
BE CAREFUL ABOUT DRINKING
THE BEAUTIFULLY LABELED
CANADIAN WHISKY
Pre-War Whisky is as Scarce as
Rivers in Sahara and All Else Is
Dangerous; Drink Moonshine and
Get Lead Poisoning.
'Ware the poison in the cup.
From the neighboring provinces of
Alberta and British Columbia,
through the underground route of
the bootlegger, all sorts of alleged
whisky comes to Montana. It is
put up in bottles like those In the
old days that contained honest
liquor, and across the curve of the
front of these bottles are beautiful
labels recalling liquid joys of the
past. But beware of these nice
looking packages. Ninety per cent
of them are rank poison, and all
over Montana physicians are fight
ing the ravages of these awful con
coctions, far worse than the Indian
whisky of the traders of 50 years
ago. There Is scarcely a commun
ity in the state that has not its al
coholic tragedy, and men with cast
iron stomachs, heavyweight cham
pion boozeflghters of the past, are
swearing off, because they are wise
and know the spurious stuff that Is
being sold everywhere for the real
article.
If the sensational disclosures made
in this month's Ladies' Home Jour
nal are true, a good many antl-pro
bihltionists will become teetotalers.
Hugh S. Cummings, the author of
"How It Kills," says, "Pre-war whis
key is as scarce as rivers in the Sa
hara." He goes on to say of the ord
inary type of moonshine and its ef
fect:
"Testimony that comes to me from
moderate drinkers indicates that it
has a profound effect upon the ner
vous system. It also excoriates the
stomach, frequently causing ulcers,
and breaks down the kidneys.
The Deadly Lead Coil
"In addition to this, other adul
terants frequently creep in. The raw
liquor is strong in acetic acid and
some of the homemade stills are
equipped with lead coils. During the
distillation the capor from the mash
carries acetic acid through the coil.
If this be of lead, the acid combines
with it, and acetate of lead, a poison,
is carried over into the liquor.
"Often the moonshine is transport
ed in old-fashioned fruit jars with
metallic caps. These frequently dis
play erosion caused by the action of
the acid upon them.
"The content of lead in the bev
erage may not be high. But lead
poisoning is cumulative. It remains
two crops of wheat with one plow
ing. The ground is plowed in the
spring after the weeds have a good
start, along in May or the early part
of June. In the fall it is seeded to
winter wheat. The following fall
after the crop has been harvested,
the ground is disced with a good
sharp disc and the straw from the
combined harvester and stubble is
cut right into the ground. This, says
Mr. Campbell, keeps the moisture in
the ground from evaporating.* It is
then seeded with not to exceed 20
pounds of wheat to the acre.
Second Crop Better
"In every instance in our experi
ence," says he, "the second crop has
been better than the first. It re
duces the cost of the two crops a total
of about $2 an acre, and the beauty
of the winter wheat crop is that It
keeps the ground clear. We have
been farming for five years now and
we haven't a Russian thistle on the
place.
"But the ground must be disced
before the stubble is sown. We have
found that this tillage is all import
ant. It is equally as important as
the moisture."
The Campbell corporation is oper
ating 109 traction outfits, all of its
plowing, discing, seeding, harvesting
and other field operations being done
with them.
ii
)
-
How's Your Blood?
Do You Need a Tonic?
Helena, Mont.—"Dr. Pierce's Gold
en Medical Discovery has no equal
1 as a blood tonic or as a liver and
stomach medicine. I was in very
bad physical condition, due to having
liver trouble and gastric stomach con
dition. ' My food did not digest
properly, would ferment, and gas
would form, giving me great distress.
I also suffered with severe bilious
headaches and my blood was in an
impoverished state. By the use of
the 'Golden Medical Discovery' I was
relieved of all these conditions which
had caused me so much trouble and
distress. My liver became active, my
food digested well, my blood was
good and I felt like a new man."—;
Joseph A. Widmer, 307 Hoback St.
Obtain the Discovery in tablets or
liquid from your nearest druggist or
send 10c for trial pkg. to Dr. Pierce's
Invalids' Hotel, Buffalo, N. Y., and
write for free medjçal advice,
M. N. A.—\VK—5-28-23*
In the system, augmented each time
another drink la taken from the lead
Impregnated moonshine. .The victim
suffers from neuritis. He is stricken
by violent cramps. Eventually, if he
still clings to his faith in his boot
logger's assurance that this is 'gen
uine pre-war stuff,' paralysis and
death may ensue."
A Travesty on Scotland
Entirely apart from moonshine
there are also types of "Scotch" and
"bonded whiskey" which, at their
best, are mere cheap Imitations of
pre-war liquors and contain what all
new or raw whiskey contains— an
amount of fusel oil that is dispro
portionate and harmful. Gordon gin
is not the Gordon gin of old, but a
cheap imitation, which is not as good
as "synthetic." The business of imi
tating old established brands of li
quors is so lucrative that glass fac
tories are reaping a harvest making
bottles identical with the original
packages. Expert print shops in the
east are working day and night print
ing labels and bonded seals and get
ting rich on the job.
While the article in the Ladies'
Home Journal Is obviously prohibi
tion propaganda, designed for its pe
culiar type of readers, the truth of
most of its statements cannot be den
ied. The author ventures the asser
tion that there is not enough pre
war whiskey in all America to keep
an ordinary American city going for
24 hours. Some very wealthy tip
plers have vast cellers, but they have
not kept their liquors to sell; they
use it for themselves and their
friends only, because it is a distinctly
American trait for a host to boast of
his lavlshnees in hospitality and law
breaking.
A. B. MacDonald, who collaborates
in the article, also says:
"That which comes from Canada is
counterfeit, too.
"Big plants have been discovered
there making sham Scotch whiskey
'especially for American trade,' un
der fake labels made in Japan. In
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, we raided
a plant that had been printing coun
terfeit labels for all kinds of liquors
for three years. They had $25,000
worth of the fake labels on hand."
In the beginning of the article the
authors pay their respects to the old
time distiller, as men of integrity
and honesty, taking a pride in the
purity of their product. It says:
"In the decade before the adoption
of the Eighteenth amendment the
liquor trade, in the main, was in the
hands of men who took pride in their
product and in the fact that they
MINERS WANTED
This company, operating a number of metal mines in Butte,
under the most modern conditions, can use several hundred ex
perienced «miners at continuous employment. Minimum wage,
$5.25 per eight hour day; contract workers now averaging $6.25
to $6.50; cost of board and lodging in Butte about $45 per month.
ANACONDA COPPER MINING CO„ BUTTE, MONTANA
Classified
BEEKEEPERS' SUPPLIES—HONEY
I SAVE YOU MONEY' on bee supplies; also
a few colonies of bees for sale. Clark
Allen, Blgtlmber, Montana. _
EXTRACTED Honey (strained), best qual
ity, delicious flavor. Two 5-gallon cans,
120 lbs. net weight, for only $12 (10c a
pound) f. o. b. here. Single can, $6.50,
payment with order. Pnrlty, safe delivery
and satisfaction guaranteed. The Rocky
Mountain Bee Co.. Billings, Mont.
HONEY SENT BY MAIL prepaid.
10 lb.
pall, $1.75. Clark Allen. Blgtlmber, Mont.
_OATE JEWELRY
WRITE TODAY for onr comprehensive Il
lustrated BOOKLET of exquisitely beau
tiful FERN AGATE RINGS and AGATE
JEWELRY.
WYOMING GEM COMPANY
Agate and Gem Cutters, CASPER, WY'O.
FOB SALE—MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE—Diamond cylinder press, slx
colnmn, power series. Excellent condi
tion. Win sell cheap. Grass Range Be
vlew. Grass Range, Montana.
KODAK FINISHING
MAIL US YOUR KODAK FILMS for De
veloping, Printing, land Enlarging. Work
finished and mailed same day as received.
Rogers & Edwards, Commercial Photo
graphers, Box 1819, Great Falls, Montana.
TEACHING POSITIONS
LIVEST AGENCY In Northwest. Easters
offices. We Hustle,
agency, Spokane.
Albert Teachers'
ST. MARY'S HOME, GREAT FALLS
LADIES wishing either room or board or
both, for any period of time, will be
taken care of at St. Mary's Home at Great
Falls, Mont,
write Mother Superior, 726 5th Ave. N.
For farther information
HEMSTITCHING, PLEATING, BUTTONS
HEMSTITCHING and Plcotlng attachment.
Fits any sewing machine, $2. ECONOMY
SALES COMPANY. Billings, Montana
HEMSTITCHING, Skirt and trimming,
Hemstitching Shop,
pleating, buttons.
» Dunn Block. Great Falls.
HAIRDRESSING. BEAUTY PARLOR
BROADWAY HAIR DRESSING SHOP
127 W. Bdwy, Butte. Quality and Service.
TYPEWRITERS
ALL MAKES sold, rented, repaired. Evans
Typewriter Co., 43 E. Bdw., Butte, Mont.
ASHAYEBS, CHEMISTS, ETC.
LEWIS & WALKER, assayers, chemists.
108 No. Wyoming, Bntte, Mont. Box 114.
COLLECTIONS
WB ABB the only bonded adjustment
company In Montana. We are bonded
with National Surety Co. of New York.
Resources,
JÜSTMENT CO., HELENA, MONT.
$15,000,000. HELENA AD
PERSONAL
MARRY IF LONELY: "Home Maker";
hundreds rich; confidential; reliable;
years experience; descriptions free. ''The
Successful Club," Box 556, Oakland. Calif.
WILL SOME ONE who has seen or heard
of Duncan Russell since May, 1907, please
notify Mrs. Oro M. Braun, 1818 Galena
Avenue, Galena. Kansas. _
MARK y ; many wealthy. Best, most suc
cessful; quickest results; write, be con
Pay when married. Kellable;
confidential. Descriptions FREE. Mrs.
Bndd, Box 753, San Francisco, Calif.
vlnced.
were making an honest living by its
distillation or distribution. Besides
this element of commercial pride
| which protected the drinker, there
1 was the larger consideration of gov
emmental supervision."
The effects of the Volstead act,
rather than its enforcement—for the
law is not enforced—will make many
quit drinking. The old-time whiskey
drinker was considerable of a con
noisseur. There Is practically noth
ing left today for the alcoholic con
noisseur to drink. While prohibition
or its fardai substitute will not
change his opinions, it's a case of
a forced put.
Shipping Potatoes East
Ross Sugg, owner and manager of
a local grocery, during the last two
months has shipped 26 carloads of
Deer Lodge potatoes to the Atlantic
seaboard. To this number must be
added one carload that went to Min
neapolis.
FRECKLES
Don't Hide Them With a Veil; Re
move Them With Othine—
Double Strength.
This preparation for the treatment
of freckles is usually so successful In
removing freckles and giving a clear,
beautiful complexion that it Is sold
under guarantee to refund the money
if It fails.
Don't hide your freckles under a
veil; get an ounce of Othine and re
move them. Even the first few appli
cations should show a wonderful im
provement, some of the lighter freck
les vanishing entirely.
Be sure to ask the druggist for the
double strength Othine; It Is this that
is sold on the money-back guarantee.
Prepare for Business
AND GOVERNMENT POSITIONS
BOOKKEEPING,
BANKING,
SHORTHAND,
SALESMANSHIP,
CIVIL SERVICE,
<14 Kind* 14)
Von can succeed by Home Stndy.
Oar lessons are plain, easy and
practical. A small payment starts
yon. Write today for FREE Cata
log and Special Rate Scholarship.
Montana Business Institute
800 Main, MILES CITY, MONT.
AT HOME!
Î
Classified
POULTRY, CHICKS, EGGS
BABY CHIX, 10 varieties'; breeding stock,
eggs for setting, Incubators, oil and coal
brooders, poultry supplies, foods, reme
dies. Write us your wants. Dorsh A
Greenfield Company, Bntte, Montana.
BABY CHIX, Ferris Strain White Leg
horns. May, 18c; June 15c. Clark Allen,
Blgtlmber, Montana.
LIVESTOCK FOR SALE
50 REGISTERED HEREFORD RANGE
Bulls, $100 and up. A. B. Cook Stock
Farm, White Sulphur Springs. Montana.
SILVER BLACK, ALASKA BLUE FOXES
CHOICE SILVER BLACK and ALASKA
Bine Foxes. Beld Bros., Bothwell, Ont.
OIL ROYALTIES
OIL ROYALTIES—$5 down and $5 monthly
for seven months buys one per cent roy
alty In 40 acres adjoining drilling. One
per cent in a 250 barrel well earns $5.00
per day.
Montana.
John M. Howland, Lewlstown.
FRUIT FROM THE ORCHARD
OUR STRAWBERRY CROP starts in early
June and from then until apple time In
the fall we offer a succession of produce,
which we grow, and which we send pre
paid. Our •rice list Just off the press ex
plains an attractive FREE offer for those
who order. Address
GOLDEN MELON FARM
Greenacres, Wash,
PLANTS
STRAWBERRY plants. Everbearing Pro
gressive, 300 plants, $3.50; 500, $5.00. K.
Quille, New Prague, Minnesota.
GREAT FALLS RESIDENCE
FOB SALE. California bungalow with
five rooms and sleeping porch; large
living room and fireplace: model kitchen
with electric range; hardwood floors
throughout; in best residence district on
north side; paved street; half block from
car line. Unusually high class property.
Address Owner, Box 945. Great Falls.
FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE
160 ACRES irrigated hay ranch, located
too far to look after. Box 148. Great Falla
FARM LANDS FOB SALE
320 ACRES, black soli, fenced, watered, 14
miles from Lewlstown, $10 per.acre. Ed.
Eckert, Lewlstown,' Montana.
CUT OVER AND DEVELOPED LANDS—
15 to 25 miles N. B. Spokane; extra good
soil; spring brooks; grows grain, vege
tables, hay, fruits; several developed
ranches; few stock ranches with adjoin
ing free range; $10 to $20 acre; 10 years'
time; 6 per cent Interest; free lumber.
Write owners for FREE BOOK.
EDWARDS & BRADFORD LUMBER CO.
ELK, WASHINGTON
GET YOUR FARM HOME
IN THE BEAUTIFUL SPOKANE Valley,
30 minutes from Spokane, Paved road, 40
inches of water for Irrigation, GRAVITY
FLOW. Easy terms, 6% interest. Ask for
booklet with complete information.
Return Coupon
THE FRED B. GBINNELL COMPANY
Spokane, Washington
I am Interested In the Spokane Valley.
Please send booklet and all Information to
Name_
Address__

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