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The Dillon tribune. [volume] (Dillon, Mont.) 1881-1941, September 10, 1886, Image 2

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053040/1886-09-10/ed-1/seq-2/

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The Gutting Case.
-:o:
ARTHUR G. SEDGWICK,
Sent to Mexico by the Government.
- io:-^—
There is good reason to say that noth*
ing is being left undone in regard to the
Cutting case, which can lead not only to
the amicable adjustment of our dis
turbed relations with Mexico because of
it. but to prevent future misunderstand
ing and friction between the government
of Washington and that of our neighbor
in a similar matter. The first step in
order to bring about these desirable re
sults, is the exact ascertainment of the
facts which have given Editor Cutting
international importance—his alleged
offense, under what Mexican law or laws
he was arrested and punished, and the
proceedings of the courts before which he
was taken. Our Government at Wash
ington cannot negotiate fairly witli Mex
ico without liaviug before it an impar
tial view of those dealings of the
Mexican authorities with Cutting out of
which have chine the difficulty. From ac
quaintance with these, the way would be
plain to a seulement of that difficulty,
provided that both governments are
disposed to do right, which it is fair
to assume that they are. A revision of
existing arrangements between them,
to prevent strain in the future under
similar conditions, would be the final
step—perhaps it is right to say will be
the final step—of a succession of steps,
the first of which has been taken in the
appointment of Mr. Sedgwick to the
work in which he is now engaged.
He is well equipped for his mission,
being a competent Spanish scholar, an
exact and skilled writer of English, and
a lawyer who has made International
Law a subject of his particular atten
tion. Mr. Sedgwick lias been an editor
ial writer on one of the leading New
York newspapers, and is the author of a
volume on international Copyyight. He
is a gentlemanly and genial man, who
understands the, to the most of people,
tedious formality and circumlocution of
the Mexican administration of law. Mr.
Sedgwick will undoubtedly bring home
with him the proper material on which
to base successful negotiations. The
American people have the good sense
and prudence not to be impatient of the
slow proceedings destined to form the
foundation on which will bo built a per
manent fabric ot friendly relations be
tween the United States and Mexico
A Gentle Stimulus
Is imparted to the kidneys and bladder by
lloKtetter's Stomach Bitters, which is most
useful in overcoming torpidity of these or
gans. Besides infusing more* activity into
them, this excellent tonic endows them
with additional vigor, and enables them
the better to undergo the wear and tear of
the discharging function imposed upon
them by nature. Moreover, as they are
the channel for the escape of certain im
purities from the blood, increases their use
fulness by strengthening and healthful^
stimulating them. In certain morbid con
ditions of these important organs, they fall
into a slugish state, which is the usual per
cursor of disease. What then can be
greater service than a medicine which im
pels them to greater activity when sloth
ful? No maladies are more'perilous than
those which aftect the kidneys, and a medi
cine which averts the peril should be high
ly esteemed.
MIMING
AT THE TRIBUNE OFFICE.
A
I
HOWELL COBB'S JOKE
BUCHANAN OUTWITTED 3Y H!3 SEC
RETARY OF THE TREASURY.
of
A Trial Trip*of tlie Harriet l.tine Whirl»
Sorely vjxril the PresldenV- An Item
ized Bill of Kxpenses-r-Cobb- Shrpriscs
■f
"the Old 'Squire."
The last Democratic president, James
Buchanan, had his own idea its to the use
of our public vessels, and n story was pub
lished many years ago of how this idea
cost Howell Cobb, his secretary of the
treasury, a nice little sum. It was at the
time of the launching and trial trip of a
revenue cutter, which had been made un
der Cobb's direction and named after Bu
chanan's niece "The Harriet Laue.'' Cobb
concluded that on this trial trip of the
new vessel he would invite the cabinet,
the foreign legations, the president, and
others of his acquaintances to take a sail
with him down the Potomac, lie made all
his arrangements without saying a word
to the president, and the matter was
pretty well advanced before Buchanan
leard of it. When it first came to his ears
Old Buck" sent for his attorney general,
Jere Black, and Black, when he came to
the White House, found Buchanan flushed
with anger. As Black entered he said:
Are you going on this blanked frolic? I
would like to know what you think of
Cobb's using our public property for his
private entertainment?"
Attorney General Black replied that he
was not going on the Harriet Lane trip,
and though he did not like to criticise
Cobb, still he was not backward in saying
that he did not approve of it. "But," con
tinued he, "Mr. President, Cobb has gone
with this affair and issued his invita
tions and I don't see what you can do
about it."
"Do about it," said Buchan, in a rage,
"do about iti Why of course I will stop it.
It is a scandalous affair and I will not be
held responsible for it. I certainly will not
allow it to go on."
wanted "ax itemized bill."
Black then placed before Buchanan the
I probability that Cobb thought he was do
ing nothing wrong when he was making
the arrangements, and the fact that If he
stopped the affair now it would cause a
great deal of scandal both in this country
and abroad, as the foreign ministers had
been invited.
Buchanan appreciated this, and finally
said that he thought that he would let
Cobb go on if he wanted to and he would
pay all the expenses out ot his own pocket.
The excursion did go on, but neit her the
president nor Attorney General Black
were present. At the first cabinet meeting
after It Buchanan said to Cobb: "Mr. Sec
retary, I want you to bring me an item
ized bill of the expenses incurred during
the trial trip of the Harriet Lane. I want
detailed account of everything—the coal
consumed, the salary of the officers, the
wages of the seamen, and the cost of every
bit of supplies used on the trip."
Cobb did not know what to make of this
demand» but he replied quietly: "Cer
tainly, Mr. President, I will do so."
Shortly after this the cabinet m< .ting
ended, and Howell Cobb and Jere Black
walked down from the White House to
gether. When they had gotten opposite
where the attorney general's office is now,
Cqbb, who had been silent up to this time,
burst forth:"What in thunder does the old
squire mean?"
Black made no reply, and Cobb went on
"You know what he means, and 1 know
you do, and now I want you to tell me
frankly what he is up to!"
Black then related his conversation with
Buchanan, and concluded with the state
ment that Buchanan had asked for the
bill in order that he might pay it out of
his own pocket.
Howell Cobb always whistled when he
was surprised, and he now gave a loud,
long-continued whistle and said: "That is
what the old squire Is up to, is it? Well,
I will see whether I can surprise him."
A SURPRISE FOR THE PRESIDENT.
It this point the conversation dropped,
and Black and Cobh went on to the treas
ury. Every once and awhile Cobb would
repeat his whistle, and as Black left him
he heard the whistle coming out ot the
treasury door as Cobb entered. The next
cabinet day came, and with it came Cobb,
who seemed to be the happiest man of the
council. The president looked glum
but Cobb was cracking his jokes at every
body. The business of the meeting was at
last concluded, and the secretaries had
arisen to take their departure, when
Buchanau turned to Cobb and said rather
sharply: "Mr. Secretary, where is that
bill?"
Cobb, assuming an innocent air,
answered: "What bill do you mean, Mr.
President."
"I mean the bill of expenses for the
trial trip ot the Harriet Lane," answered
Buchanan sternly, "have you got it with
you?"
"Oh! that bill," said Cobb: "yes, I believe
I have it somewhere about my clothes,
and hereupon Cobb fumbled first in one
pocket, and then in another, and finally
drew out a piece of crumpled paper which
he handed to the president with: "I guess
that is it."
Mr. Buchanan took it and looked over it
item by item. His face was full of disgust
as he read, and he seemed to look daggers
into the paper until he reached the end,
when he almost jumped to his feet as he
exclaimed: "Why it is receipted—paid
full by Howell Cobb!"
"And who in thunder should have paid
it but Howell Cobb?" broke in Cobb with
an air of injured innocence, "it was my
frolic. Who should have paid for it?"
"Sure enough! sure enough!" was
that Buchanan said. But he brightened
up at once, and in a short time became as
merry as Cobb had been at the beginning
of the session. Cobb and Black went
away from the White House together, and
as they were going down the steps into
the yard, Cobb said: "Didn't I come it over
the old 'squire that time?''—"Carp" in
Cleveland Leader.
Effect* of a Molasses Bath.
An incident in a Melbourne foundry is
said to have led to the discovery that
plunging iron castings into a mixture of
molasses and water softens the metal to
such a degree that it can be worked as
readily as wrought iron.
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TRIBUNE OFFICE,
BI
Kept on sale at the
-OR—
Put Up to Order on Short Notice.
Acknowledgements,
Quartz location blanks—large or small.
Water right location blanks.
Bargain and sale deeds.
Warranty deeds.
Mortgages.
Chattel mortgages.
Summons—Justice's court.
Executions—Justice's court.
Subpoenas—Justice's court.
Mittimus—Justice's court.
Affidavit of Attachment—Justice's court.
Garnishees—notice of.
Promissory notes—several styles.
Blank shipping tags printed to order.
Blank programmes and folders.
Stock receipts—Bound the long way for
office use, also, the short way for conve
nience of carrying in the pocket.
Blank tablets, for counter or pocket use,
also, put up to order on short notice.
Ruled cardboard, for placing under un
ruled paper when writing.
Letter heads, note heads, statements, etc
neatly tableted without extra charge ; and
blotters added at cost of putting them on.
Fine blotting board kept in stock and cut
to any desired size.
Mourning note and envelopes in stock
and printed to order.
Everything in the printing line at cash
prices Tor cash.
Fraulx SoliulB,
Boot and Shoe Maker,
AND HARNESS REPAIRER,
Main St., Baxnack, Mont.
Formerly for two years custom boot and
shoe maker at Dillon. First-class work
guaranteed to all customers.
THE MONTHLY CLOBE
OKU THAR
FOR TWENTY-FIVE CENTS.
We will send to any address in North America
an illustrated monthly magazine- one year for 25
cents. A splendid illustrated story every month.
Prize department — valuable Iraoks and ' presents
given away monthly. The Ui.obe circulates in
every State and Territory in the Union. The best
magazine for the price published in the world.
Sample copies free. Agents wanted on good com
mission. Addiess: POOL BROTHERS, Mechanic
Palls, Maine, U. S. A. .«
TRIBUNE STEAM JOB OFFICE.
The facilities for turning out job printing
at the Tribune Job Department are equal
to those of the best printing establishments
in Montana. Our presses are run by steam
and with the latest styles of types and ma
terial we are prepared to turn out all kinds
of iob work.
, f
; ; ciilora. and Bozemaa.
BAIN WAGONS,
CHAMIPON HÄHHC MACHINES
HOLLINGSWORTH and TIGER HAYRAKES, '
RACINE CARRIAGE COMPANY'S
Wagons, Carriages and Buck Boards; Frazier Road Cart
Miller Buggies, Tooney Sulkies, Kentucky Breaking Carts
MOLINE steel Sulky and Walking plows; Flying Duto
man steel sulky plows, Cassady sulky and gang plows Oliv
chilled walking plows; Randall & Stoddard pulverizing k
rows; Triumph grain drills, with and without grass seedTt
taohment; cultivators, harrows, potato diggers, fanning mill
Cahoon seed sowers, Strobridge seed sowers, scythes, grab
cradles, hay forks.
HARNESS, SADDLES, WHIPS, SPURS,
Halters, Halter-straps, Breast-straps, Hame-straps, Riding Hrhlles, Hart,
ainorcs, Sweat Pads, Nose Bags, Hobbles, Harness-snaps, Horse
Blankets, Fly Nets, Lap Robes, Wagon Covers, Tents;
HEAVY HARDWARE, HARD WOOD,
Horse Shoes, Mule Shoes, Iron, Steel, Picks, Hammers, Crowbars, Shovels, To,
Calks. Horse Nails, Carriage Bolts, Log Chains, Open Links, devices,
Wagon Jacks, Charcoal Forks, Anvils, Vices, Blacksmith Del
lows, Road Scrapers, Wheel Barrows, Hammer Handles,
Pick Handles, Doubletrees, Singletrees, Neck
Yokes, Spokes, Felloes, Reaches, Axles,
Wagon Tongues, Buggy Tongues,
QP HOWE SCALES,^3
BARB WIRE, BARB WIRE,
Fence Staples, Binding
Twine, Grain Sacks, Ore Sacks, Sack
ing Twine, Sacking Needles, Grass Seed, Hal
ing Ties, BLACKSMITH COAL, STOCK SALT.
FOR CASH, or to prompt paying customers we offer special
inducements in the way of lower prices than any other house in Mont.
We Solicit NO OTHER Class of Custom! Highest cash price paid for HAT,
GRAIN, Hides and Pelts.
OAIiIj.
DAN. T. CHAPMAN, Manager.
DILLON JEWELRY AND GUN STORE
DILLON, MONTANA.
MRS. L. KUPFER, PROP'S.
Dealer in
HOWARD,
AND ELGIN
WATCHES.
THE WALTHAM A SPECIALTY.
Also carry a large and well-selected stock of
SOLID GOLD JEWELRY
of all descriptions.
Fine and complicated Watch work solicited from all parts of the coin
All work warranted for one venir.
*
trv.
Also carry the largest stock of all makes of SHOT GUNS, RIFLE»,
PISTOLS and AMMUNITION, FISHING RODS and TACKLE.
Hunting and Sporting Goods of all kind* at Wholesale and Retail.
CIT
STOSS
-AND
ASSAY OFFICE,
BAN NACK, MONTANA.
MEADS ft SONS,..... PROPRIÉTÉ
Chemical work of all kinds done,
attended to. Write for terms.
Samples of ore sent by mail will 1* P r ®' 1
IMPORTANT NOTICE!
PRICES GREATLY REDUCED
»!
For the next SIX WEEKS at the
DILLON ART STUDIO,
m: Office.
« Take'., **:
One door south of the Tribcxb Office.
OgXTÄTa la.-Cabinets, per dozen, $6
per dozen, M ; pur nalt dozen, $3.30. Our new Cuinems and
(»rices, ensures the liest das« of work. Faithful Likenesses -
find artistic effects obtained from our new and elegant backgrounds, r *l , 1 rc ?
National Park. Our Studio is complete in every respect and fully up with the m
reduction lasts. Views of Dwellings, Ranches, etc., executed on short notiW; §.-nEVf
twice scewi
t/o:ne ca":
Arti' ! -

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