OCR Interpretation


The Dillon tribune. [volume] (Dillon, Mont.) 1881-1941, September 10, 1886, Image 3

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053040/1886-09-10/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

gift gillon gribnne.
NEWSPAPER DECISIONS.
1. Anyone who takes a paper regularly from the
poçtoftice— whether directed to his name or an
other's, or whether lie has subscribed or not—is re
sponsible for the payment.
2 . If a person orders his paper discontinued he
must pay all arrears, or the publisher will continue
to send it until payment is made and collect the
whole amount, whether the paper is taken from the
postoflice or not.
.......'....." ■* «fusing to take
The courts have decided that
another address at the option of the subscriber.
lleniittances by draft, check, money order, or
registered letter, may he sent at onr risk. All post
master» arc required to register letters on applica
tion.
Ileaverhcml County Officers..
ill................Thos. K. Jones.......
,nd Recorder.
-•Jud.-e
Phil. D. McGough.
. C.V.*
. K<
rtf. Wi
.........<>. W. W. K ,u
.......John Gannon....
strator.I l. J. Sweet......
....... Dr. II. D. Pickm:
.......J. C% Poindexter..
I Phil Lovell........
. ! >i I
Dillon.
. DM Ion,
.Dillon.
.Dillon,
.Dillon.
' A.
. Ill
Picket t
THE STATUE.
As perfect in their symmetry as thine,
O inarticulate marble lips, were thorny
-My love-once raised to mine, yet tinged
with rose
And freighted with a redolence divine..
Her poise of head was queenly: fair urn!
line
Her alabaster arjjas that shamed the
snows: " ■.
Her gracious bearing hud thy ptiiv,re
Ain: stately was
ns tue
nine
turn;
es rippled,.-bright
Knowledge
brow, "v"
Hound which lier tre....... .....
as gold;
Sweet as a.-soiigbird'h oii.atbu.tdingTiouglV
The liquid'Voice that from her lips out
~ rolled; -''J.'
But;lo! these came tin awfijl changé, and
now -
Thou, in th.iue icy husli, art not more
cold! -
1 —Clinton Scolltrd.
!* A Scene in Our Congress.
A correspondent at Washington writes
his impressions of the national legislature:
. "I was in both branches of our national
legislature and tilled afresh by the great
dome and its works of art, by the marble
rooms and stairs, which can never be ap
preciated without being seen. It was my
first view of the senate in session. The
strong light from overhead gave great
. beauty to the green carpet of the floor.
My anxiety to compare the senate with
the southern Methodist general confer
ence was opportune for the former, as it
was in memorial session of the late Mr.
ter.
*
Miller. All was quiet in the room. The
speaker, in detailing his military career at
Murfreesboro, Nashville and other points
in Tennessee, was as gentle, tender, and
pathetic as would have been a minister at
the funeral. That so few senators wer«
in their seats surprised me, and they were
the laziest looking set of fellows 1 have
ever seen^ unless 1 except u lot of tramps
in a city park.
"Going into the house 1 saw a large
group of members in front of the speak
er's desk, and they were passing between
men who were counting them, eac h slap
ping the member cordially on the shouldei
as he would announce 'one more for the
affirmative,' or negative, as the case might
be. Such a proceeding by the congress of
the United States was novel, to say the
least. It was far less orderly than a dozen
small lads whom I saw in their own way
drilling with sticks for guns and colored
rags for flags down by the treasury later
in the day."—Nashville American.
No Monument Erected to Kcjjulu*.
We have just learned that there is ne
monument to Regulus. Why has thisbeeu
neglected so long? More than 2,000 years
!iave passed since he performed one of the
most unselfish actions ever recorded.
Hegulus was a Roman general in the wat
against the Carthageuians. Being de*
tested and made prisoner, he was kept in
prison five years. Then reverses caused
his captors to desire peace. The Roman
general was released on parole and sent to
-mine with the Punic envoys. Regulus
proved himself a regular brick on the oc
casion. Regardless of what might hap
pen to himself he advised the Roman sen
ate not to make peace with < 'arthage. lie
' a "l if they continued to tight it out on
'hut line Carthage was bound to fall. He
not even in favor of an exchange of
prisoners. His advice being adopted,
aegulus went back to Carthage with the
ambassadors by the next train and was
promptly put to death. And yet Regulus
■'as no monument. Who will lie the first
to subscribe to a Regulus monument
-utul?—-Texas Siftings.
____
A Canal to Tap Niagara.
Engineers pronounce tlie project of tap
Pmg Niagara river by means of a canal
entirely practicable, and experts have tic
claved that not elsewhere within the
known world are there such natural ad
'' antages for the creation of a gigantic
'•ater power, and that it can be delivered
« Lockporttotheexte.it of 300, «00 horse
power, if so much shall be wanted, at a
-'uninnuB of expense. Lake Erie and al!
the
great upper lakes would be the mill
Pond for this power—the Niagara river the
ead race and Lake Ontario its tail race,
i ie supply of water can never be diiuin
led by drought; no spring floods
th? etS ~ wiU lear ;l "' av the
nor
lams, for
Vf-wi resources of the country.—Chicago
I rivate Letters of Noah Webster,
nr.' of tLo interesting private corres
gran», nce Xoah Webster, the lexi
whichh) " Ul »PPear in the biography
Ford iT ls 8 ra nddaugliter, Mrs. Gordon L.
rQ ' M* In hand.
■The An,li eilce Help, the IMa or
l.rel.u.,1 ol £a«B
that upon one occasion, when playing in
C St f ep P ed to «»> t'ootH{>hts*anci
.aicl to one of those wouctrously cultivated
cu uro'f.T- hichdelisht t0 exl2 thei?
( their silent soloumitv '*1 nifi a
and gentlemen, if you don't
cun t act. Irving
applaud I
as necessary to the'actor'lsair'Mbn- 'f
applause be essential ns an incentive. a-H
a momentary rest, how much mure
careful and painstakin.
essential tu
It takes bra
__ .. lins awake brains: Given
-nltiv'. r i i Ce 0t t lJ iiek ""' i tteil, well-behaved,
cultivated people, not afraid to express
their appreciation in applause, and anv
actor who has a soul will reward their at
tention and enthusiasm by pluyin
best. Emerson never said
than tins, "We get out, ... ,, ul
want we take to it," and nowhere
more true than in a theater. T
electrica! tecipmcity between an
actor governs
every t'neatrical
begets like
at llis
truer thing
i a tiling just
tilis
To
t tie character
performance.
the icy v.v
out >ee. to the enthusi-.
we^carry the glowing coals of a «livino
it. fortunately, it burn
leal
mhm
result
of
tliis
extreme v
ariatiim in aiuii
ences
is si
ngiili
u- aud into
vesting. I, et an
lie lor ;
[day
to a
r<iieees-<ioti
: of plilegmatn
coao: ;
ry ,
iiuli.
tiiOU;
gii all i-unutry
audio:
'-'•es
at e
nut piile
gmatie by any
nieaiiî
an
d ail
era wiiiie
In* wili liml a
met ho
id gi
•owin
ig upon lii-.i
: utterly uusuit
ed to
the
mur
e experiem
■ei! aiid l-eiiueil
audio;
ices
of a
i-ity. Sa t
liât a traveling
actor lieec:
Is tw.
à , mctiioils.
•'a.- noisy and
expio
ivel
the i
Jther'qniei
anil expressive.
—G'eoi
fgfe (
Mi
iin in Chic-a
:?b;
' S;l n
itui-y T ill in
uf I'ri es
"iff./
[)hen
Smitli rt
-ivnriy voail a
J
ls
paper btïore the New Turk Academy of
sanitary value of lives in
y.l&.Xil.X- ^ is >t well-known fact that
flïihiiÿ the intense' heat "of summer there
more suffering and death from sun
Stroke and high temperature in tin north
ern cities than in t lie south, a result
which must be attributed to the absence
of suitable protection. From a,d;)0 to
Î>,ÔUÛ. people die every, suriyner in the me
tropolis front the effects of the betit
ln the arid, treeless streets und avenues
the temperature often runs from Kill to
150 degrees Fall., when under the i:-<»u,chea
of a thrifty shade tree it will not exeed 70
or 80 degrees. In the absence of
sheltering trees, the stone and brick
walls act on the principle of
the regenerative furnace, and absorb the
heat of the sun to yield it up again during
the night. If trees were planted in the
streets. the pavements and sur
rounding walls would be much cooler,
and at the same time trees would
absorb the deleterious gases thrown
off from the lungs and from de
composing matter, yielding in return a
supply of pure oxygen.
The value of a systematic culture of
trees in all of our large cities can hardly
. .
ke estimated. From both a sanitary and
artistic standpoint they are a very desir
able addition to any large city.—Scientific
American.
The Wily a Mine is Developed.
These new mining companies nil make
good assay showings of their ores, or of
ares of adjoining or neighboring mines.
They are not worth the labor making
them. 1 would rattier have a good relia
ble assay of the men who are at the head
ef the enterprise. That is all there is in a
mine. When a company starts to develop
a mine it never knows what it is going to
cost until it gets through. Three of us
may go in. The other two may lie ready
to put up their full share of the money to
strike the bonanza. I may get tired,
'hey do not want to develop my property
for my benefit, and they become tired and
quit. The mines lie idle for some time,
and finally they sell out tor little or noth
ing, to get rid of it. The purchasers must
have my third, and I get all I put in it, or
may be more.
Then another company starts out, and it
winds up the same way. Finally a suc
cessor strikes it rich, and the stock bi
cornes very valuable, but it is only after
successive companies have been organ
ized and gone to pieces. The presumption
is that all of these mines will be good, it
the persons at the head of them will only
st: k together: but there the rub, and
that is.why an assay of the men is of more
moI|leia tlmn „f the ore. -Gloiie-Democrat
; ntui-viow.
The Lives of lull lcr-l>:iy llilicils.
The lives of latter-day 1 bipeds are mostly
half-told tales. Our season ends In.-fore
ninety nine ol a hundred men c,
more than •' few m.Mger first li
tea:
their harvest. Will
statistics ot the Pent
sous lo believe that
of human longe vit >
sidéra bl y shortened
in all its form:
allotted term
Hie
>ui any aji
teach, there are rea
le original average
must have been Con
Tic* stimulant habit
ha-j probably reduced our
> pet cent. Luxury, early
•rworlv
marriages, medical delusions,
indour life, the grievous hurry aud worry
of civilization. Iiave . 1.1 cotitii iU. t J*" 1
sluire l " l,1L ' ;i :init f * ' ^ ' it} .,
Hebrew patrutr« - is. g. '.
nrage longevt y o ^ J " j
P oets °' nneteut • cl
travelers ou the ug u
»f life could
,l:ive _rc*;icli et l » exhausted 1
^ lusle /'' *"
lue
Now, as surely
veurs ago, time distrilmres his laurels
with ultimate fairness, but for the cat
tailed term of our present generation that
justice comes mostly too late, and the
wreath has to be deposited on a grave —
Dr. Felix L. Oswald.
The Dressing of Our UaiiBhier*
stow so little* atte:
dressing ot her daughters. Anything
more sombre and out ot keeping uitu
place and season than their costumes tlie
other afternoon at the Greek tlie.itiL
have seldom seen; and the same »nu.»
would as aptly apply to their appeal ape -
at°the qpndng oftl» colonial exhibinon.
—Cor. London World.
PROPBSSIONAt,
CAKD8.
M. D. FICKMAN. *.
h y ■ 1 c 1 n n and Stir S oon,
n.u.oN, Montana.
jj'
Ù. at 1 lu-;u:rear of Epi
■'irect. Offi.vh mrs i p. r
•il Church, blah,
.1 p. m. dailv.
A. L. DAVISON. M.
Physician and Surgeon,
DILLON. MONT.
• nu Mnat.m i -tixvt, i dm • - n. v;h nf T'uuu n i .
T-I HNRY N. RI.AKE, AssochteJ e-sncKofMon
L * t.m.i years. Attorney and Counsellor at law
Virginia City, Montana. ["45— 1
J H. CAI. 1 .AV AY. Attorniv A- Covnsei i.ok.
• Practices in all the Courts ar. 1 Uni. cd States
I.and Offices in the Territory Ail business attended
to with promptness and fidelity, V.- —■* Vit- VI i
J AMES M. PAGE, U. S. Mineral Deputy M-t.
v e vor. Land business made a specialty.
Salisbury, Montana.
SMITH \ 311'!.TON.
ATTORNEYS * ( OIXSH : OKs AT I.AW.
3DilloAi, Mo ntana.
Will practice in all Courts of the Territory and
. alten ! to any matters in the Land Office
Department.
T. J. Galbraith . II. J. Bcrlkioh.
GALBRAITH & BURLEIGH,
-4X. ttoiraoys at Xi a, -vsr,
Dlllnn. Kenverheitcl Co., Montant!.
Office. First door south of the Corinne Hotel, h i-tl
Busmtssa cards,
AMOS C. HAM.. ! A Y 1 1; !■ IIAUK 1 NC.TON.
ALPEN IIKN.NtTT.
HALL, HIRRINGTON & CO.,
(successors to Raymond, Harrington & Co.)
VIRGINIA CITY, - - MONTANA.
Transact a Genfral Rankino Business
Hlglient Mnrkel Rate
raid lor Gold llii-t. Gold is- > i ; \ r liullion, and
. Territorial m-l (.s.. ...
HOTBIi CARDS.
BANNACK HOTEL,
lanuaclx Montana,
Grugin & Gibson, Proprietor*.
l oin l oi table accommodations for guests. Good
• »file run in connection with the Hotel.
TTiola, Hotel.
NI0H0LIA, LEMHI COUNTY, IDAHO
Mrs. Mary McRea, Proprietress.
Good accommodations and the best the market
a fiords on the table.
([nrâs.
< 3 r. A. II.
Regular meetings ol Steehman Post, No. S, G.
A. R., are held on the second and fourth Tuesdays
of each month at Post Rooms.
Comrades in good standing are cordially invited
to attend.
OTHO KI.E.MM, Post Com.
James D. Risiior, Adjutant.
, NCI ENT ORDER OF UNITE!
1 WORKMEN.
Dillon Lodge, No. 7 , A. 0.17. Xt %
meets the lirst and thirdTuesduy evcninM '
of each month, at 5-o'clock, in A.O.U.t»
Hall on Montana street. Sojourning brethren, ft
good standing, are cordially invited to attend.
CHAS. HIRSCHMAN, M. W.
L. E. Stkingham, Recorder. ,
KNIGHTS OF LABOR.
D illon assembly, no. 3731 , k. of l.,
meets at Dart's Hall the second and fourth
Tuesday of every month, at 7:30 p. m.
E. O. O. F.
^■KpANNAfK LODGE, No. 3,
vjiir *"* "'rets every Wednesday evening
—at its Hall in Glendale. Sojourning
brethren, in good standing, are cordially invited to
Wm.
I
A. C. Ml)
K. OF JE».
{OCCIDENT LODGE, No. 8, K.ofP.,
, ^ meets i-i convocation every Thursday
evening in the Castle Hall, corner of
ii.mnack and Montana streets.
All visiting Knights are cordially invi
ted to attend.
! . I. \ lil.sl IN'. 1 .
■ I K.
A FOLLO LODGE, NO. 15.
g Wit meets every Monday evening, al
VKMKpF hs Hall on the corner of'Montana and
Bannack streets. Sojourning brother»,
in tiood standing, are cordiabv invited to attend.
PUBLIC NOTICE.
Tin- midi-rsign-.-il t
inclosed lands b\ an
of game. No -limit
premises by onl-ider
cuuliOTi ;tt l;t\v lor -o
Mi an llrsiNi--.
till:
> I'ODDKN IIIJos.,
i , im.'ni(mi , i;.
W. It. I ARTKII.
1*1111. I.OVKI.L.
I »iüciii, Moni., J :
Brewster*« Patent Rein Holder*
Your lines are where you put them—not
I under horses'feet, tine agent sold Ucloz. in
I 5 davs, one dealer sold 6 do/.i n i V days.
Samples worth |l.s® free. v\ rile icr tern.*,
E. E. BREWSTER. Holly. Mich.
l . Il MOI 1
"AN.Sl,
I-:, i. \ki.son. \.g.
1. II.
«. F.
« ». « itU nl.i
lvK'.imptn
jlj, \«». i.» # Ilit- tN til«' i>t
:• ml ,.l s.itn
•il IV night
• f f.tcli montli at I.ikI^c*
il..::, in GK
ul..:.-- .VI
-njn-irtiing lViti-iiir. il- in
• Mi ni -lliu.li
,1 iin-nil.
WM..GAI.!., G. 1*.
I. W. Mil
i.i-H, Suri! »f.
jj' C K,>vv ' I. amont, V. P. \V. H. Smi AD, Secy and Gen! Manager.
'
DILLON LUMBER AND GRAIN COMPANY.
Successors lo CROW A SMEAD.I
WHOLESALE* RETAIL DEA1.ERS IN
LUMBER, LATH, SHINGLES, DOORS, BUNDS,
MßULßiNGS, BRACKETS, BUILDING PAPER,
^^.Xa^TTS,
AM) ALL KINDS OF SU ILIMNU 31.VTKRI VL.
Missoula Pine Flooring*, Rustic Bevel Siding and
Finishing Lumber constantly in stock and warranted
equal to Eastern Lumber at much lower cost.
Him
k Walnut.
( );ik, Maple
and older ;
We
also make
a ''peeialtv e
-1 handling
We
are mukin
^ sweeping
reduetions
ited.
Call am
1 see us.
W. 11. K
\\ . 11. SMKAI). Scv'v ami ( iun. M a natter.
CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE.
THOMSEN & BLIVEN,
DEALKKS IX
Fruits, Candies, Nuts; Figs. Dates, Currants,
Raisins; Etc., Etc.
Also a Full Xjiixxo or
F-A-ZLÆXX-TSr G-ROCBRIBS.
a(h:nts for the almf.rt fisher dkewino company.
33 XD. XvX^.XSX^O'W,
Feed, Salehs Livery Stable,
DILLON, MONTANA.
HELENA STREET,
Teams and Outfits for Tfcmrists and Traveling Agents for all pavU hK
the Territory, constantly on hand.
13^ 3^o. 1 Teams for Sale or Biro on Seasonable } J
\\ holesalc and Kctail Dealer in
T. W. POINDEXTER,
Yll4.lt
L
Montana Stkeet,
DILLON, - - - MONTANA.
Kui ps constant|\- on hand a fresh and complete slock of
FANCY AND STAPLE
GROCERIES,
Hardware, Tinware, Crockery,
Glassware, Lamps;
Clothing and Gent. s Furnishing Goods,
Boots and Shoes;
Blankets, Comforts, Etc.;
WINES, LIQUORS-'CIGARS.
Highest Cash Price Paid for Furs and
Produce.
JBEHAL DISCOUNT FOR CASH.
Jl'riT WHAT YOU Am i.,
WANT. -ill Tin
Tin
r«N'.it»v.'cc;( ■
kt-t-p tlii-m.
«mit: K limn
nul Horn.- in-.
Kithcr
S 4 . 31 ., -S' .. 3 .. MUH
I Ktll.lt I I-Alll nil
ri-,:i-i|,i of priii-,
it your lmriUvun
»dialer docs not
Rflcrcnccs—l'irst National ILink t I>v
Iron and Engine Works, Detroit,Midi,
» TURBINE WATER WHEEL
AT A BARGAIN! ..*3
One lyiiivh Turliinc Water Wheel, !ir>t-class in
every wav, only bi*e«% run a tew months und as good
as when it left the shop. Tin- wheel is .1 soli \
bronze casting with steel >haft, lignum vita? step
and boxing, both of w hit h have screw adjustment.
Parties wishing .1 y«M»d wheel should see this one
before purchasing. Call on or address,
H. BRUNDAGK, Thiüi xe Office,
Dillon« Montana

xml | txt