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Daily inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1881-1901, January 13, 1899, Image 7

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DEBATE TAKES
PLACE TODAY
Between Representatives
Two Colleges.
of
MICHIGAN - NORTHWESTERN
Each Side Has Selected Strong Men—
The Question Upon Which
They Will Debate.
Ann Arbor, Mich., Jan. 13.—In the first
debate between the Northwestern Uni
versity and the University of Michigan,
to be held under the rules of the Central
Debating League, established last year,
.... , . , ,___fine
which is to take place today. the Nortn-^
A
a
........ *- '. ----- *' : . m
western will be represented by Andrew , g
Cooke, E. R. Perry and Charles Lederer. ]
These men are considered exceptionally !
strong debaters Cooke and Perry having
, , " , , . , ..... , i
an unbioktn recotd of \h o <■ - *- |
at the Northwestern, and Lederer, who e
is now a student in the Northwestern j
Law School, having won high honors in j
and oratorv at the University 0 f !
' ' j
'
j
!
debate
%
Hg
Wm
CHARLES LEDERER.
Chicago, from which school lie was grad- j
uated. Lederer was the alternate in the
Chicago-Miehigan debate in '97. and won
the oratorical prize at the university that
year. The question for debate will be:
''Should the United States Maintain a
Much Larger Navy Than She Has at
1
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.....wuir^.
E. R. PERRY.
Present?" Northwestern's debaters will
have the affirmative and Michigan will
support the negative. The winners of
this debate will meet the winners of the
Chicago-Minnesota debate for the finals
In the Central Debating League on the
first Friday in April, at the Auditorium
in Chicago.
Ann Arbor also has its best debaters
out and will make a strong fight.
Mr üp
OF
il
TiiE EXCELLENCE OF SYRUP OF FIGS
is due not only to tho originality and
simplicity of the combination, but also
to the care and skill with which it is
manufactured by scientific processes
known to tho California Fig Syrup
Co. only, and wc wish to im; rcss upon
all the importance of purchasing the
true and original remedy. Ao the
genuine Syrup of Figs is manufactured
by the California Fig Syrup Co.
only, a knowledge of that feit will
assist one in a 7oiding the worthless
imitations manufactured by ether par
ties. The high standing of the Cali
fornia Fig Syrup Co. with the medi
cal profession, and the satisfaction
which the genuine Syrup of Figs has
given to mi: lions of families, makes
the rame of the Company a guaranty
of the excellence of its remedy. It is
far in advance of all other laxatives,
as it nets on the kidneys, liver and
bowels without irritating or weaken
ing them, and it does not gripe nor
na useate. In order to get its beneficial
effects, please remember the name of
the Company —
CALIFORNIA FIG SYRUP CO.
SAN »KAN DISCO, OmL
lODIBVIUE. >lr. «I« VORK. afi
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:
i
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fellows who were bound for Malolas.
^
A RIDE OVER A RAILROAD IN MA
NILA.
The following most Interesting letter,
descriptive of a ride over the Manila &
Dagupan railroad, has been received by
the parents of E. M. Moores, a soldier of
tiie First California Regiment, now in the
Philippine islands.
On November 20 the guard woke mo up
at 4:30. I had a pass to let me out before
reveille. I met Meylan and Saunders at
the Bridge of Spain at 5:15. It was too
early for caramatas. so we had to walk
to the station, about a mile. We had
dressed as civilians so as to pass our
guard at the depot, who would let no one
through if he was a soldier, unless lie had
a pass from General Otis. Passed the
guard like a charm and bought tickets
to Malolas, the headquarters of Aguin
aldo, about thirty miles from Manila.
Our tickets cost $1.25 (Mexican) iirst
class. There are three classes. All the
natives, except officers, travel third class.
The first class cars are divided into two
sections, with doors opening on the sides.
All the coaches are made in England and
have steps running the full length of the
car, like our electric cars. Each seats,
three in the rear and two in the front
facing the other three. The seats are
caned. They never use cushions or brass
work, as the natives would cut off the
cloth or leather from the cushions, and
every brass fitting they can get their
hands on they unscrew and steal.
The only other first class passengers
were two Minnesota officers. Both were
mere were also on the train three ser
g Vants Q f i| ie Minnesotas and cw
from !
Idahos. The three sergeants from Min- ;
nesota had bought tickets clear through
to Dagupan, and we decided to go on
with them, officers and all. it is about 12 :) !
m jj es ^ t |, e en( j of th e ]i nP> and our tick
e ^ g on ]y CUiS { us ,$ 4.75 (Mexican) each way, :
very cheap traveling. Before we had gone j
very far we were all very well ae- !
quainted. !
The Minnesotans couldn't say enough ]
in praising the California people for their j
treatment of them. The first station was j
Caloson. about three miles from Manila, j
j
The railroad shops, etc., are there. A
guard of arm d insurgents were standing
at attention at the station as the train
pulled in. We had heard so much about
their disliking the Americans that we
were in a quandary as to how we would
be received, but it was O K.
All they were looking for were Span
iards. At one station when the corpo
ral looked in the window Saunders point
ed to me and told him 1 was a Spaniard.
He called the guard and was going to ar
rest me. 1 pretended to be scared at first, j
but when 1 spoke to him it was all right, i
A colonel of the insurgents got on at the
first station. He was very dignified, but
soon loosened up and talked a great deal.
We passed a station about every six
miles. Usually there was not much to he
seen of towns on account of the trees.
The stations were all well built, as was
everythin
bridge
steel and well built.
The train traveled at a fair rate, but i
j they stopped so often and so long that
we didn't make very good time. We
averaged about fifteen miles an hour.
; At every station there was an insur
gent guard. The first fifteen miles, or
until we reached Angeles, there was
nothing much but rice fields on both
sides as far as we could see. A great
deal of this country was more or less un- j
der water. It is astonishing how little !
the native owning these fields live on. Ail
they eat is fish and rice. They fish any- ;
where. All along the side of the railroad, j
even in the fields, they were fishing. Most \
f the rice is just ripening, although in |
ry thing about the road. All the j
lge- 3 , and there are many of them, are :
> îinH ivn hiiiH
some of the fields they arc sowing seed. j
Their way of harvesting is quite a eon- j
trast to our combined harvesters. -V ;
great deal of the rice is harvested by !
hand, picking each stalk separately, one j
at a time. They break each off about
four inches from the head with the right
hand, holding them in the left. !
When they have a hand full they tie j
it in a bundle and swing it on their back.
The rice is dried after it is harvested.
Some of it they cut down in bundles and
haul it in clumsy carts with two solid
wooden wheels diawn by water buffalo, !
single or in tandem, but never double. |
It seems, they can harvest rice this way j
and then sell it as cheap or cheaper than i
our farmers does the wheat. About fit
teen miles out we came to the pueblo of ,
Angeles. After leaving there the ground
was much higher and very rich. The
mountains were on both sides of us a
few miles from the road. In one place
they are very near the track. They ap
pear about like our mountains at home
and arc covered with trees and brush. !
Along this stretch of country there is in
some places quite a lot of timber along
the road, but it is hardly large enough to
be valuable. The trees are about two
feet in diameter and on some there isn't
a sign of a limb nearer than a hundred
feet above the ground. The scenery
through here is very beautiful. There
are many pretty groves of cocoanut and
banana trees. There is about fifty miles
of this country. I got the liest bananas
up there that wc have had on the island.
The natives come out at every- station
with fruit to sell. The children also
bring out glasses or a cocoanut shell full
of clear water to sell for one cent.
Some of our crowd would throw cop
pers to the "kids." It was great fun tn
see them pile up on each other in the
mud. like a lot of football players. After
leaving Bayamban, which has quite a
large river flowing by it, we ran again
in lower swampy country. We changed
conductors at Bayamban. The new
one had been to the world's fair at
Chicago and laid been to school in Eng
I land and spoke very good English.
I We reached Dagupan at 2 p. m. Dagu
: pan is also the name of a province. Each
i province has a president. The conductor
j took us up and introduced us to the
I president. The president and his secre
I tary were both very smart loooking men.
Thcir quarters were anything hut cle
'gant, but they took us in and gave us
1 the best meal thev could. None of them
! could speak English, but we managed to
; carry on a limited conversation in Span
! ish. Tlic-y treated us fine and I have
! much more respect fos- them since I
! made this trip than ever before. They
told us that if the United States hold the
islands it would suit them; in fact, they
would be glad of it. but if they went
back to Spain they would never give up,
and I admire them for it. They told us
that there never was any ill-feeling
among them for the Americans. They- in
vited us to stay all night, but as rliere
were so many of us we concluded to
sleep in the train, then we wouldn't have
to worry about getting up in time. After
dinner we went out to see the town.
There are about 8,000 or 10,000 inhabitants
In the town. Now all are natives and
Chinese. There was only one street with
stone buildings and stores, all the bal
ance of the town was composed of ware
houses. The town ts built on quite a large
river about four miles from the gull' of
Lingayen. The insurgents are holding
about 400 Spanish prisoners there. Ever
since the revolution commenced the town
hasn't been much but an army camp and
•Annua! aalea eve.'6,000.000 Bores
**¥K3F*$
POE BILIOUS AND NERVOUS DISORDER;
=uch as Wind and Tain in the Stomach,
iliddiness. Fulness after meals. Head
ache, Dizziness, Drowsiness. Flushing.'
of Heat, Loss of Appetite, Costiveness
IJIotcnes on the Skin. Cold Chills, Dis,
im bed Sleep, Frightful Dreams and nil
Nervous and Trembling Sensations.
THE FIRST DOSE WILL GIVE RELIEF
IN TWENTY MINUTES. Every sufferer
mil acknowledge them to be
A WONDERFUL MEDICINE.
JAEECHAM'S PILLS, taken as direct
ed, will quickly restore Females to com
-.lete health. They promptly remove
destructions or irregularities of tho sys
cm and cure hick Headache, Fcr a
Weak Stomach
Impaired Digestion
Disordered Liver
IN MEN, WOMEN OR CHILDREN
BeechanVs Rulls are
Without a Rival
An«? havo the
LARGEST SALE
if any Parent Hedio.ir© in the WorAit
25c et ••-11 Di 'g '■'tores.
the natives are very poor. We drov<
around in Caramatas (two-wheeled, ccv
ered carts). Ours was drawn by a steer ]
of the sacred cow stork, and he moved
over the ground quite lively. 1
We did not spend a very comfortable
night, but we did not mind that. Oh the
way hack wo met one of the English di
rectors of the road. He gave us a great ;
deal of information about the country.!
He is very much in favor of the United :
State's holding the islands. j
He also said that there was every in- 1
dlcation of gold, copper and lead in the |
1 hav
fared
mountains through which we passed. If
the Americans hold the islands 1 think j
there will be some great discovt ries |
made. They are now organizing an ex- j
pedition of over JOO to make a tour of I
Luzon. Only ojjq thing 1 woul like bet- !
ter than to .go with them and that is t
home. We arrived in Manila at 2 p. j
m. yesterday afternoon.
My pass expired at midnight Sunday,
hut when 1 reported to the captain ho
lid he would consider ihr pass extended,
not heard how my Oregon friends
Their pass expired at the same
time.
A NEW CURE FOR GRIP.
evll> Sulphur is. tho preventive he sug- :
ts «« It has shown." lie says, !
1 . . . . . . ... • .* I
President George T. Angell, of the
American Humane Education Society,
offers what he claims is a panacea for the
"how wearing sulphur in the clothing has
prevented yellow fever, cholera and other j
diseases. Half a teaspoonful of powdered :
sulphur in each shoe or stocking is con
sidered to be sufficient. I find in the Lon
don Lancet that no less authority» than
the president of the Institute of Civil En
gineers of London declares that the sul
phurous vapor produced by the coanima
tion of coal in that city kills the disc ■as»*
germs in the atmosphere."- Sulphhr is
very cheap, and whether- it ddstr<*yr>Tnr'
keeps out germs of disease from the body
or only acts upon the imagination it can
not do much harm to try it.
NOT SAYING- MUCH FOR HER.
IF THE BABY fS CUTTING Hi TETiJ
-
P e sure and use that aid and w*l!-tr'ed
remedy, Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syr at
^ or children teething. It soothes, i;\
chll(1 - Eoft ? ns the Pums. allays ail - r -
cures wind colie and ,s the best re
^r diarrhoea. Iwenty-rive cents i.
tlc>
Blabmore—Admitting that Boobley i
henpecked. I'm surprised that his w
boasts of it.
j Babway—Does she. indeed?
i Blabmore—Yes, she's been frequently
heard to say that she's made him what
, he is today.
, n .. - ,
! ' nw emploj.es of John J. Daly, who w
$10,000 REWARD.
We, a committee appointed by (he
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j
{
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murdered on tiie morning of Novem
9 , while performing his duties as an elec
tion officer ir> precinct 8 of this county, do
hereby^ -offer n. behalf of said employ« ?. a
reward of $ 10,000 for Information which
will lead to the conviction of the mur
derers.
Joseph Nevin, John Early, Mountain Con
mine.
James Brennan, John Laird, Green
Mountain mine.
Joseph McGinnis, Eugene Kelly, Diamond
mine.
Edward McGuire, Daniel Griffin, Bell
mine.
John Hanley, Daniel Ryan, Never Swear
mlne
Timothy Lynch, Thomas Murray. Ana
eonda mine.
John Collins, William Page, SL- Law
rence mine. ..
Butte, Mont.. Nov. 1^, 1898.
We do hereby certify that the amount
of the above reward has been deposited
with us and will be paid according to the
terms of the foreguing offer.
HOGE, BROWNLEE & CO.,
• Banker*
J d McGregor
VETERINARY SURGEON.
Honorary graduate of the Ontario Ved
i erinary College, Toronto, Canada. Treats
1 all diseases of domesticated anlnfcüs ac
cording f> scientific principles. Office.at
Marlow's Stables, 104 S. Maiit'tstre«.
; Telephone 293. All cases promptly at
tended to.
DR. HUIE POCK
119 S. Main St,
The only pur* root and herb treatment
la Butta
Specialist in Chronia Disease« ef long
standing. Permanent cure* mad* In ad
Private Disease. The Disease* of Wom
en hav* been made a study of for years,
tnd are successfully treated.
HUIE POCK & CO.
Dealer In
CHINESE AND JAPANESE
Faney Goods, Teas, Chinaware and
Ladies' Dress Goods. All Kinds of Bllka
Ladies' and Gentlemen'« Underwear
Made to Order.
119 S. MAIN ST.. BUTTB.
THE GRAND OPERA HOUSE
G, O. McFarland, Resident Mgr.
3 Nights and Saturday Mati
nee Commencing Thursday, Jan. 12.
Positively the last appearance here of the
greatest of all Swedish Comedy successes
OLE OLSON
With new features, up-to-date specialties
and a great cast, including MISS ST.
G FORGE IIUSSEY.
PRICES: 25c. 50c, 75c, $1,00.
THE UNION FAMILY THEATER
DICK P. SUTTON...,
.....Manager
Second week and groat success of
the R* E, FRENCH
Theater Company
WEEK COMMENCING JAN. 9
In Harry P. Munson's Great Military
Manson's Great
Drama
A FAIR REBEL
Note—The verdict of the public—"The
THE CRAM! OPERA HOUSE
best company at popular prices seen in
Butte for years."
--
p«oUR NIGHT
' * j> A y
The Great New York Laughing Success,
All New and Original.
ç Imor« and Leonard's Latest
. COMMENCING SUN
TANUARY 15.
Comedy Créai ion
HOGAN'S ALLEY
SEE the Yellow Kid. Hogan's Alley
with its goat and parrot. The pretty
military girls. Everything, for every
thing is new.
Brices 25c. 50c, 75c and $1. Sale of seats
begins Saturday. January II. at 10 a. m.
State Savings Bank
Paid in Capital
Surplus and Un
JOHN A. CREIGHTON........President
G. W. STAPLETON......Vice President
T. M. HODGENS..................Cashier
.$ 100.000
ndivided Profits.... 50.000
Corner Main and Park Streets, Butte,
Under State Supervision and Jurisdiction.
Interest Paid on Deposits.
Sells exchange available in all the
principal cities of the United States and
Europe. Collections promptly attended
to.
TRANSACT A GENERAL BANKING
BUSINESS.
DIRECTORS—J. A. Creighton. Omaha;
G. W. Stapleton, A. II. Barret. E. D.
Leavitt, S. V. Kemper. T. M. llodgons.
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OF BUTTE.
Andrew J. Davis................President
James A. Talbot..........Vice President
E. B. Weiriek......................Cashier
George Stevenson......Assistant Cashier
A General Bauïiuï ßnsiiuss Transa&i
FOREIGN EXCHANGE
We draw direct on all tiie principal
cities of Europe and issue our own let
ters of credit, available in all parts of the
world.
Special attention given to collections.
27 N. MAIN STREET.
W. A. Clark.
J. Ross Clark.
' Transacts a General Banking Business.
i -
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I Euy Gold Dust. Gold Bars, Silver Bul
I Ik ' 11 iin<1 Bocal Securities.
W. A. Clark & Bro
(Successors to Clark & Larabie.)
BANKERS
Boxes for rent in the only Safety De
posit Vault in the city.
Sell exchange available in all of the
principal cities of the United States and
Europe.
Special attention given to collections.
ALEX J. JOHNSTON, Cashier.
Wm. L. Hoge. R. C. Chambers, Marcus
Daly. M. B. Brownlee, F. E. Sargeant.
Hoge, Brownlee & Co
BANKERS
Eutte City, Montana.
Transact a General Eantini Fnsiness
Collections promptly attended to. Ex
change drawn on all the leading cities of
Europe.
HOGE, DALY & CO.. ANAC ONDA
CORRESPONDENTS;
Wells, Fargo & Co., New Y'ork.
Wells. Fargo & Co., Salt Lake.
Wells, Fargo & Co., San Francisco.
Omaha National Bank, Omaha.
Pennyroyal pills
P Original »»4 0«iy Ucoulne. a
' sure. »W»y« r?Mable.LADic* ufk Drutrrirt
for Cä ichffrM h'nglUk Ui*mnmd Brand in
lieg and Gild ibdtalllß boxen, æalod withvUD
kblM ribben- Take no other, ha/use dan- \W
I gerous substitution* and imitations. At v
Druggists, or send 4«. in stamps (hr particulars,ta^
Limon laie and "Relief for 1 .ad lea,** in letter. b\
return Rail- 10,000Testimonials. Name Pape*
Chic beater Chestleal C« ^ Mad! sea Bq oar*
8oK b; til loom bnttfliu. :VUILAIK.. I'i.
Railway Time Tables
To St. Paul,
Minneapolis,
Kansas Ci lr
Duluth,
Omaha
And Points
East and West
To
Spokane
Seattle
Tacoma
Portland
California
Japan, China,
Alaska, Klondlka
TIME CARD—BUTTE.
ARRIVE.
No. 2—From Portland and all
points west, arrives at M. U. de
pot .............................10 40 pm
No. 11—From St. Paul, arrives at
Montana Union depot daily at 6:55 a m
No. 12—From Anaconda, arrives at
Montana Union depot daily at.. 9:10 p ni
DEPARTS.
No. 1—For Portland and all points
west, leaves M. U. depot daily
at ............................... 4:45 a m
No. 11—For Anaconda, leaves M.
IJ. depot daily at ..... ............. " I® a IT>
No. 12—For St. Paul and all east
ern points, leaves M. IT. depot
daily at ........................... 9:20 p m
ACCOMMODATION—To Pony and
Norris, Mondays and Fridays; to
Twin Bridges, Tuesdays. Thurs
days and Saturdays; to Parrot,
Wednesdays; leaves N. 1'. local
depot at ............................ 8:00 a ra
Pullman Sleeping Cars, Butte to St. Paul
without change.
Pullman Sleeping Cars, Butte to Missoula
and Portland.
CHAS. S. FEE.
G. P. & T. A., St. Paul, Minn.
W. B. M ER RIM AN,
General Agent. Butte, Mont.
OREGON SHORT LINE,
Intermountain Line to the East and
West.
Passengers by purchasing tickets via
the Short Line to the East and West
have the choice of several routes.
Direct connections are made at Ogden
and Granger with the Union Pacific and
at Ogden for all points East. Enjoy the
nl Ogden with tiie Bio Grande West-|
orn for all points East. Enjoy the com-!
forts of a Pullman Vestibuled train con
sisting of sleeping and elegant reclining!
chair cars, always fresh and clean as tho
TO THE EAST
Via Salt Lake' Denver, Omaha or Kan
sas Uity.
TO THE WEST
Via Ogden and the Southern Pacific for
California.
Via Huntington and the O. It. & N. for
Portland and California.
Train for East and West leave Butte 4
p m. daily.
Train from East and West arrive at
Butte 1:45 p. m. daily.
For tickets, sleeping car reservations
and further particulars call on or ad
dress No. 19 East Broadway, Butte, Mon
tana.
IT. O. WILSON. General Agent.
D. E. BURLEY, O. P. & T. Agent, Salt
Lake City.
p. W. ECOLES, General Traffic Manager
Salt Lake City.
THREE lU ONE
ÄKntuan
Uv-'i I ■ DSU
1 "
';F- f.
-•^1
CmCAOT
P. M. SEYMOUR,
GENERAL AGENT,
30 EAST GRANITE STREET,
DUTTE, MOI T.
The
Route of
the New
"Great Western Limited"
"Fit for a King"
TO
CHICAGO and KANSAS CITY
New Buffet Cars, New Compart
ment Cars, New Standard Sleep
ing Cars, New Reclining Chair Cars.
C. J. BROOKS, Traveling Passenger Agent. - St. Paul.
F. H. LORD, Gen'IPass'r and Ticket Agent, - Chicago.
BUTTE, ANACONDA & PACIFIC RAIL
WAY COMPANY.
UNION PASSENGER STATION.
TIME CARD.
Trains leave Anaconda for Butte as fol
lows:
N°- 2 —Butte Express .............. 8:30 am
No. 4—Helena Local, via Butte and
Great Northern railway .......... 2:05 p m
No. 6 Atlantic Express, via ISutte
and Great Northern railway, for
St. Paul and all points east and
................................7:20 p m
Trains leave Butte for Anaconda as fol
lows:
No. 1—Anaconda Express .......... 10:00 a m
No. 3—Great Northern railway,
Helena Local ...................... 12:3« p m
l'; 0 - 5—Anaconda Express .......... 5:00 p m
No. 7—Great Northern railway.
Pacific Express ...................10:40 p m
Train No. 4 connects at Silver Bow with
the Oregon Short Line train for all points
east, west and south.
Northern Pacific trains leave Anaconda
as follows:
No. 104—Atlantic F.xpress, for St.
Paul and all p oints east ......... 8:15 p m
No. 102—Pacific Express, for Port
land and .all points West......5:00 a. m.
Northern Pacific trains arrive at Ana
conda as follows:
No. 101—Pacific Express, from St.
Paul ami all points east .......... 7:55 a m
No. 103—Atlantic Express, from
Portland and all points west ____10:05 p tn
All trains arrive and depart form the
Butte, Anaconda & Pacific Union Passen
ger station at Anaconda.
Tickets for sale for all points, Local and
Through, on the Great Northern railway,
Oregon Short Line railroad and Northern
Pacifie railway and their connections.
Steamship tickets for sale to all points 'n
Europe, via the above lines.
Atchison, & Topeka
SANTA FE R. R.
(Santa Fe Route.)
East via Ogden (o Kansas City', Chicago
and St. Paul, making close connections in
union depots With trunk lines to all points
east and south. Also the direct line to
Galveston, Texas, City of Mexico and
points in New Mexico, Arizona and Cali
fornia.
For particulars call on R. O. W. R. R. 0 »
O. S. L. agents, Butte, or address
C. F. WARREN,
General Agent, Salt Lake.
Northern
Through service between St. Paul, Minne
apolis, Helena, Butte, Anaconda, Seattle
and Portland. Connections at western ter
minals for Kootenai country, Oregon, and
California points, Alaska, Japan and China.
Connections at Twin Cities for points east
and south. Single and round trip tickets to
all points, und baggage checked to destina
tion.
LEAVE.
Atlantic Express, daily ............8:30 p m
Helena Local ......................... 3:10 p in
ARRIVE.
Pacific Express, daily ..............10:30 p m
Helena Local .........................12:25 p m
City Ticket Office, No. 41 North Main
street, Butte. J. E. DAWSON, Gen. Agt.
For Those
Who Want the Best
the Burlington's St. Paul-Chlcago Lim
ited.
Most costly, most beautiful, most lux
urious train ever placed In service on any
railroad woBt of Chicago.
Pronounced by Mr. Buliman the "finest
train that ever stood on wheels."
LlgV.ed by electricity. Heated by
steam. Compartment and standard
sleepers, buffet-smoking-iibrary car,
chair cars, a-lft-cnrte diner.
NO EXTRA FARES.
Leaves St. Paul Union Depot at 8:08
p. m. daily r —after arrival of trains from
Montana and the Pacific Coast.
Tickets at offices of connecting llnea
PHIL DANIELS, Pass. Agt.
Butte, Montana.

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