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Daily inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1881-1901, January 23, 1899, Image 1

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Daily Inter Mountain.
VOL. XVIII. NO. 255
BUTTE, MONTANA. MONDAY EVEN 1NG, J AN U ARY 23. 1899.
PRICE FIVECENTS
$
I fl™ 1899 STOREKEEPING I
* yy already shows betterments ^
j| on every hand--at every tarn, ijj
iff January finds us with the very
Ï freshest and cleanest of stocks $
Ç . . . . , - . jf !
* and increased shopping iacili- £ !
f a- ___-i n____ i ii _______ -ii
$ ties, and these shall grow in ^
£ goodness as the season length- $ |
If „ 1 . . t i r ii
Jens. Our high standard of *|
1 quality shall be maintained, *jj!
£ and prices shall be the lowest
jff , ,i jli ;
£ at all times. J !
2 The store is full of pleasant jjM
5 surprises, even for those who j;
£ knowit best. Have you seen ^ j
? iho MCP.If VA/C A D in Qyj- jii j
in
Ç the NECKWEAR
J North window?
\ At 50 Cents
I The Siegel
Clothing Co
9* :
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& j
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$
% $
5 Men's, Boy's and Children's
5 Head to Foot Furnishers.
I
I COB. MAIN AND GRANITE!
$
0 $
I
IF WHAT I
IYOU WANT I
». I
Ü Is mymed below, and its prie* $
I fails to please you, we shall £
J tiling it
I IS SOME
THING QUEER
They are all pretty to look at. _
ful as well as ornamental, and the J
jl prices show a saving too plain to re
'{(; quire any comment.
î T ™ f o * (vu r l i m 11
-T J6Wdl bet Lrllt ililltimeled lop.l A
A- 75c
POWDER BOXES
* SA1VE EOXES
'I Same Finish 35 to SOceacb
I IN QUADRUPLE SILVER
I PLATED GOODS
!(■
3» We Show
$ Stuir Bowls at .
y Pickle Castors at
^ Butter Dishes .
• Cake Baskets at
S


•)){
^
ai


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11.75 Jit
»
, ^ U P
: lea oet?, O piecesi at $5i00 up V
5 Tea Sets, 4 nieces, at $9. 00 up 4
* *i)I
; AND DDR B16 SHOW WINDOW
4
iÿ
4
5
4
.jÜ
4
? Tolls the Same
I Bargain Story Day After Day
I
I J. H. LEYSON I
J . Jeweler and Optician •
ÿl i
? 221 N, Main St.. Butte 4 i
Î pji :
4 j
0 K; ^'Urfc'-kVOi 5 1
$41
THE VOTE FOR
U. S. SENATOR
It Shows a Few Changes From
Satin day.
CLARK IS THE GAINER
He H a c!:: H rnLhl?Lr M e a w C re tlie
the Men Wh0 switched.
s n <:clal the Intel- Mountain.
Helena, Jan. 23.—The supreme court to
day
rendered six opinions. The court
granted new trials to Spotted Hawk,
George s - Gt ' ddl ' s and Thomas weich.
T l>" other cases were Isaac Mayer vs.
David awecney of CaBCOde county> Judg .
ment affirmed; Zion Mercantile company
Edwin Ij - May0 > juds ' mon t reversed;
Kcmpton vs. Jubilee Placer company,
dismissed.
T,le j° int balIot today resulted: Con
Fox 2> BIake IIannah and Mol .'
changed from Fox and Hartman to W. A.
Clark. More said he had been voting for
a
if
a man who represented the free and un
limited coinage of silver and felt that
he had made no change in casting his
vote for Clark. The republicans voted
for Cornelius Hedges. Representative
Hedges, with proper delicacy, did not
vote for his father, but cast his vote for
Henry N. Blake.
In committee of the whole in the senate
several measures were considered.
Among the measures introduced was a
bill by Whiteside making disposition of
the $30,000 exhibits of the joint investi
gating committee. The bill provides that
the money go to the state orphans' home.
A similar bill was introduced in the house
this afternoon.
The senate commenced a re-canvas« of
votes in the Geiger-Whiteside contest.
In the house notice of a bill was given
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by O'Brien appropriating $10,000 of the
boodle fund for the completion of the
state orphans' home building.
Toole's suffrage bill was introduced;
also Hedges, relating to the collection of
property taxes: Lindsay's, relating to or
ganization, regulation and inspection of
loan associations, and Beasley's, pro
tecting the rights of sheep herders.
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HARDEN WILL NOT
BE APPOINTED
civilian members the president suggested
New York, Jan. 23.—A dispatch to the
Herald from Washington says: Upon
the arrival in Manila of the civilian
members of the Philippines commission,
the first action which they will be re
quired to take will bo to elect a secre
tary. Edward W. Harden of Chicago,
selected a few days ago, will not fill the
position. During Iris conference with the
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that Rear Admiral Dewey and Major
General Otis should be consulted about
suc h appointments. During the war Mr.
Harden has been employed as a news-
paper correspondent at Manila and had
made bis headquarters on board the
revenue cutter McCulloch, which partici-
pa ted in tlie battle of Manila bay and
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subsequent operations. In reply to the
president's inquiry, Admiral Dewey
laaliled that he had no objection to Mr.
Harden's appointment. General Otis,
however, took exception to the appoint
ment of the Chicago man. because, it is
said, he published In a San Francisco
newspaper a statement concerning the
Philippines which Otis declared untrue.
In view of General Otis' message, the
(decision to appoint Mr. Harden as sec
rotary of the commission was revoked.
soon became
ARAŒF0RLIFE
Niagara Falls, N. Y., Jan. 23.—While
nearly 100 persons were on the great ice
bridge in tho sorge of the Niagara river,
the icy mass was broken loose from the
and upon the upper arch enjoying the
beauty of the crystal-like structure.
They heard the cracking of the ice and
saw the great mass as it was moving
by the swift current of the river, and
hundreds shouted warning to those on
the bridge. Some of those venturesomo
persons had only gone a short distance
for the shore the great bridge was loos
enpd from lts fastemnps- T}ien it he _
came a race for life, but the youngsters,
amid wild shouts, finally reached the
shore.
It was seen then that all except three
from the river bank, while others were
out in the center of the- bridge and'were
crossing the river. Those near the end
soon found safety, but further out to
ward the center were a number of small
boys. Before they were fairly started
persons had reached places of safety.
One was a man not far from the New
York side. The others were a man and
woman who were fleeing across the ice
toward the Canadian side. The man
near the New York shore kept his cour
age well. His eyes were directed toward
the steel arch under which he would pass
tlie ice continued to move down the
river. Onward it went and just as he
reached the bridge lie leaped from the iee
and caught the arch as it rises not far
out from the abutment. The man and
woman made record time meanwhile and
safely reached the Canadian side.
The ice is piled in a great mass about
the abutments of the upper steel arch,
and it is rumored that the structure has
been injured, but this cannot be verified.
The steamer docks on each side of the
river have been wrecked and the ice has
piled up close to the inclined railway
building' in the gorge so that it is in
danger.
CUBAN COMMISSION
WELL SATISFIED
New York. Jan. 23.—A dispatch to the
Herald from Washington says: The
Cuban commissioners who have been in
Washington for six weeks upon affairs
connected with the plans for future gov
lernment, have completed their work and
will soon sail for Havana. They will
proceed to Santa Cruz and report to the
assembly. The commissioners express
great satisfaction, and state that they
have succeeded in gaining favorable ac
tion upon all their requests.
One commissioner says that a certain
amount would be advanced by the United
States for the payment of the Cuban
soldiers and upon receipt the army will
be immediately disbanded. Just how
much would be granted or how much
each soldier would receive he would not
say. This amount will be secured by the
revenues of the island over which th>
American government will have control
until the debt is paid. The members of
the commission were disinclined to dis
cuss tlie success of their mission until
their report has been submit ted to the
Cuban asembly.
Colonial Commission
Washington, Jan. 23.—The secretary of
war has completed the organization of
the colonial commission to undertake the
adjustment of all matters of detail re
spec ting the government, of territories ac
quired during the war or occupied by
United States forces. The personnel of the
commission will be: General Robert P.
Kennedy of Ohio, Curt.is Guild of Massa
chusetts and Charles W. Wilkins of
(Michigan The commissioners will deal
with the bestowal of franchises and eon
cessions, the distribution of moneys to be
spent in public improvement and all
troublesome issues that bave arisen and
are to arise in Cuba. Porto Rico and the
Philippines.
Supplies For Indians
Washington, Jan. 23.—Senator Cullorn
'has been informed that during 1899 ail
federal contracts for Indian supplies will
be placed in Chicago. The bureau of Tn
dian affairs, however, is handicapped in
its purchases in Chicago because of the
absence of an Indian warehouse. After a
thorough investigation by Commissioner
Jones it has been found that the govern
ment could save $20,000 a year in trans
portation charges alone if the letting of
contracts for Indian supplies were con
fined to Chicago. Senator Culloin has ad
dressed Secretary Alger with reference to
army supplies and expects a reply next
week.
Probably an Explosion
New Orleans, Jan. 23.—The Rev. Ed-
ward H. Budd. who was thought to have
been lost on the Paul Jones, is alive. The
vessel was detained in Pass A la'Outre so
long by foggy weather that Mr. Budd
grew impatient and left the party return-
ing here. Mr. Budd had been a professor
of Latin and Greek at the Rt. Mary sem-
inary at Knoxville, where the three young
women were pupils. Mi-. Jones, the owner
of tlie yacht, has carefully examined all
the wreckage found and lias come to the
conclusion that the explosion theory is
correct.
MONEY, BONDS AND MARKETS
Money and Honda
New York, Jan. 23.—Money nominally
2Vi. Exchange steady 484%<!/ 485, demand
482%ffj)4K4 sixty days. Certificates nomin
ally 59 1 /2'h60 , 2. Silver 59%, Mexicans 471.6,
governments firmer 3s 107%, new 4s reg
12815; coupon 129*6: 4s 112*4; coupon 123%;
5s reg 111% coupons 113.
New York Stock Market.
New York. Jan. 23.—Stuck market trad
ing this forenoon lias scarcely a parallel
in tlie history of the exchange. Shares
which until recently were attended with
conservative fluctuations became specu
lative footballs and bounded around five
to ten points on enormous dealings. Trad
ing was unprecedented in volume and
rapidity of fluctuations. Fluctuations in
the first half hour were highest and the
market soon broke on liquidation and
short selling but again was going up
strongly at noon, led by coalers. The
prices attained were generally the high
est of the largest uninterrupted move
ment in recent years.
Chicago l.ivc Stock
Chicago, Jan 23.—Receipts—Hogs. 4.000;
weak; light $3.50(03.72: mixed $3.55&3S2;
heavy $3.554? 3.85; rough $3.504? 360.
Cattle—19.000; steady, lower. Beeves
$4004?6.00; cows, heifers, $2.004/4.80; Stock
ers feeders. [email protected].
Sheep—23,000; lower westerns $2.904? 4.15;
lambs $3.754/4.85.
Chicago Live Stock
Chicago. Jan 23.—May 71 @ 71%. Close:
May 72. Corn—38. Oats—28. Pork, $10.35.
Lard—$5.90. Ribs, July—$5.27. Cash. No.
red 71 @ 71*6; No. 2 hard 66*6067; No. 1
Northern spring 68*64/69*6; No. 2 North
ern spring 67*6®69. Corn—36*6. Oats No
a—27.
THEIR VIEWS
ARE DIFFEREHT
Division of Sentiment in the
Dreyfus Case
IN THE PARIS NEWSPAPERS
Organs That Favor the Accused Are
Radical as Wei! as Those Who
Are Opposed to Him.
New York. Jan. 23.—A dispatch to the
World from Paris says: Discussing tlie
Dreyfus case, Francis de Presseuse, edi
tor of the Temps, and a zealous Dreyfus
!ite, writes
"The true reason for Beaurepaire's
conduct is tjie most scandalous feature
of the present deplorable crisis in his
irritation against the government on ac
count of the humiliation it subjected him
to ten months ago, when, at its instance,
during tlie Panama business, he was
brought before a meeting of the court of
cassation. Probably also, Beaurepaire
will derive from the Echo de Paris better
pay than lie received from tlie court of
cassation. Another reason given by my
friends anxious to accuse him that he is
suffering incipient mental derangement.
They wish to prevent a judgment of ac
quittal, which would be a condemnation
of the war office. That the result antici
pated lias not followed Beaurepaire's ac
tion was proved by last Thursday's vote
in tlie chamber, and today's in rejection
of Faure's demand for permission to
interpellate the trial of Bloquait. It is
I a great crisis. The whole forces of re
daction are seeking under tlie mask of na
tionalism to defeat justice. Judgment
I decreeing Dreyfus innocent will be ac
jeepted by public opinion when that opin
! ion is informed of all the treasons on
which it is based. I do not know wh it
will be the judgment of the court of cas
sation, but from documents I and my
friends have, 1 believe it will be acquittal.
If the court gives reasons for the decision
France will accept them, it is impossible
to believe other wise, if Dreyfus returns
to Paris there will tie no serious disturb
ance. There will be some slight demon
I strations in the street, nothing more."
The Unionist, an anti-Dreyfus organ,
has this to say:
Beaurepaire, a, thorough patriot, re
signed because he was indignant at see
ing certain magistrates of tlie court of
cassation making themselves Instru
ments of an international and anti-na
tional campaign. His declarations have
.already produced a result by holding in
suspense the decision of the criminal
: c hamber. The resignation has profoundly
moved opinion. The partiality of tlie
court is evident and a judgment ren
dered under such conditions will not be
ratified by public conscience. If the
criminal chamber remits the case to a
new court martial France will wait the
solution, but if it should dare to annul
without remitting, tlie agitation will as
sume grave proportions among tlie peo
ple and in the army. France is a mili
tary democracy, passionately attached to
its principles of liberty, lint firmly re
solved to defend her independence and
lier honor. Every citizen is today a sol
dier and the immense majority of them
preserve a respectful flag. If a foreigner
(imagines he will be aide to make profit
out of this agitation he deceives himself.
The French soul is awakened.
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MONEY MARKETS
IN ENGLAND
CABLE ABOt'T THE CONDITION OF
j AFFAIRS IN LONDON—RATE
OF DISCOUNT.
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I New York, Jan. 23.—The Times London
financial correspondent cables:
J "The change 1 led you to anticipate has
ironie over our money market and we are
,11(01' positively flooded with banking
credit so much so that we growl at the
Bank of England for not giving mure
Ilian three per cent. This is no wonder
when balances are being lent in the open
market at % of one cent and when money
can be borrowed for a week or more for
one per cent. Discount fell to 1% per c-ent
Wednesday and was not much better than
i nvu per cent yesterday, although the bill
; brokers made a struggle for 2*6 per cent
when they found tin* bank hanging in tlie
air at 3*6 per cent and export demand for
gold reviving.
"If an irate dealer in credits is told the
directors of the bank have acted accord
ing to usage, the reply is nearly sure to
be usage be hanged'. With money barely
at one per cent what is the good of calling
for 3*6 per cent. That is a rough and
ready view which takes no notice of the
.difficulties besetting the bank. It has
drawn in no gold worth mentioning by
the four jier cent rate. The total stock of
ruin and bullion is not £800,000 larger
j now than on the 13th of October last
1 when tlie bank rate was raised to four
I per cent and is still all told below £32,
1400.000. Nor have foreign gold demands
! upon us ceased. They seemed about to do
so at the beginning of the week, but no,
sooner did the market send discounts
1 down than they revived again and £160,
000 left the bank for South America the
|day the ratio was reduced. American and
'German orders for gold were merely dor
mant. while higher discount rates seemed
j probable. The bank then might well hesi
tate.
"Gold exports or not, I think tlie rate
I w jn pave to come down to three per cent
; if not lower. Up aloft, where it is, the
; bank can exercise no conti-ol over the
open market and this year it is in a gi-eat
I part deprived of its usual levei-age. The
• March quarter is the one on which the
j heaviest tax occurs. These collections are
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lodged in the bank by the treasury, which
often lias nine or ten millions more on
band at the end of March than at the be
ginning of January. Such pilings up strip
the market and give the bank control of
rates and it may this year begin to exer
cise this control by the latter half of Feb
ruary.
"Meanwhile the treasury is paying out
for armor plates, ships, fortifications,
etc., faster than it receives, as is proved
by the fact that the government balances
this week are nearly £350.000 less than
they were a year ago. Here lies the true
cause of the extreme cheapness of money.
Both market and bank are overwhelmed
by the treasury disbursements and while
these continue undiminished ease must
prevail.
"Speculation in stocks is inevitably
stimulated by the ease and enormous
business now doing in several depart
ments of our stock exchange. In the
American department, however, selling
still predominates and your railroad
sécurités, bonds and shares continue to
bo sent home on an unexampled scale. At
the same time a beginning is being made
in a counter movement. Speculators arc
joining in the buying and the humble in
vestor is also putting in an occasional ap
pearance, timidly as yet, a few bonds
here, ten shares there, but he is buying
and in another month may be an eager
and indiscriminate buyer of the stocks
he scorned to look at when they were $20
or $50 cheaper.
"Abroad the markets are strong, too.
but still there is distrust of Paris. It lias
been putting up Spanish bonds on various
pretexts, the conversion of the debt one,
land otherwise making a brave show, but
the troubles of Spain are drawing to a
head all the same and these on the bourse
with them. The Spanish government is
stifling the bank of Spain by its demands
and all the bank can do is to emit more
; notes. Its note circulation now is £58,
400,000. fully £11,000,000 more than a year
ago, and the cry Is for more help. French
] bankers must lend Spain at least £40.000,
000 to keep her going and I do not see
where or how they can find the money."
Senate Proceedings

Washington, Jan. 23.—The bill reported
by the judiciary committee providing for
attendance of witnesses in matters per
taining to the court of claims was passed.
Tlie special urgency deficiency bill,
carrying $30.000, was also passed.
White addresed the senate. White
spoke not only on the Vest anti-expansion
resolution but also to that offered by
Bacon, declaring the inhabitants of the
Philippines are entitled to liberty and in
dependence. White took as texts for bis
remarks certain paragraphs from the
supreme court decisions, a sentence from
the McKinley Atlanta speech and a para
graph from the report of Admiral Dewey
to the navy department saying the Fili
pinos were as well quallfVeïî for self gov
ernment as the Cubans. He said he had
no intention of discussing the question
from a legal standpoint as such discus
sion would serve no useful purpose.
"The views of senators of eminent abil
ity," said he, "demonstrate the futility of
endeavoring to secure accord upon that
point."
Senatorial Ballots
Wheeling, West Virginia, Jan. 23.—No
decisive result was reached today in the
! senatorial fight. The contested oases In
! the house are still unsettled. The commit
tee on elections is expected to report this
'afternoon, recommending the seating of
cine more democrat, changing the i-epub
! lican majority in the house for a senator
to the other side.
Pennsylvania, Jan. 23—Fifth ballot:
Quay 63, Jenks 49, Dalzell 11, Irvin 3.
Stewart 8. Huff 3, Grow 3, Markle 1,
Downing 1, Widener 1. Necessary 76;
paired 98; absent 4.
Delaware, Jan. 23.—Ninth ballot: Gray
(democrat) 14, Addieks 15, H. A. Dupont
10 Rest scattering. Necessary 24 .
Lincoln. Neb., Jan. 23.—Allen 53, Day
ward 41. Webster 10, Thompson 7, Lam
tii rtson. Friend and Foss 2 each. Reese 3,
Weston 3, Hinshaw, Adams. Cornish,
Vamluseii, 1 each. Necessary 64.
rnttleinen to Meet
Denver, Jan. 23.—Hundreds of cattlemen
are arriving to take part in the conven
tion of the National Live Stuck associa
tion, which opens tomorrow. Tlie attend
an ce will be large. The states represented
in the convention will be: Arizona. Cal
ifornia, Colorado, Idaho, Illinois. Kansas,
! Minnesota, Missouri, Montana. Nebraska,
Nivada. New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon,
J South Dakota, Texas, Utah, North Da
1 kota, Wyoming and New York.
TELEGRAPHIC BRIEFS
Washington, Jan. 23.—The president to
day nominated Col. Eugene Griffin, First
U. S. V. Engineers, to be brigadier gt-n
eral.
Madrid, Jan. 23.—According to a dis
patch Jrom Manila, the Filipino congress
at Malolos has authorized the release of
Spanish civil prisoners and will shortly
liberate the military prisoners.
Washington, Jan. 23.—McKinley, ae
com pa niod by Mrs. McKinley and a party
of friends, went down the river this morn
ing on the dispatch boat Sylph for a day's
'outing. All members of tlie party are
guests of the white house. The party will
return this evening.
Stockholm, Jan. 23.—Although the
health of King Oscar continues to im
prove his physicians have ordered him to
take a complete rest. Therefore his ma
jesty has entrusted the government pro
visionally to Crown Prince Gustaf and
has gone to Saltoja, Baden.
Dublin, Jan. 23.—John Daly, the Irish
political prisoner, who was released
from Portland prison in 1896 after having
.been sentenced to penal servitude for life
in 1884 for complicity in tlie alleged plot to
blow up the house of commons, lias been
elect? d mayor of Limerick by a unani
mous vote.
He
nessy s
ANN I L SALE OF
o i!
Köslin
Underwear
Any one who has made a study of th<
Muslin Underwear proposition appreciate!
nothing is gained by buying cheap stuff
This is the first sale of Muslin Underweai
in our New- Building and it shall be out
best. Our buyers have been very particu
lar to purchase underwear that will stand
the light of day and bear the most critical
examination. This Muslin Underwear was
made expressly for us by manufacturera
of national reputation, who would scorn
to use textures other than satisfactory
and whose names are synonymous with
trust-worthiness in cut, style, workman
ship and finish. \Vc have here garments
as perfect in every respect as can be pro
duced and for similar articles our price is
lower than that of exclusive stores. Even
our low-priced Underwear has the "taste
of home cooking," in its makeup and it's
what you want for every-day wear. Our
finest Underwear was made for us by Si
mon Stern & Co., and there can be none
finer.
Simon Sterne & Co.
Are universally acknowledged to he the»
leading manufacturers in this country for
Women's Fine Underwear. Without
doubt their underwear is absolutely Uie
choicest in the United States. It is of
such a high order that descriptions are in
adequate to tell its tale.
We are Selling Agents for Butte.
COMBINATION CHEMISE
OF VERY FINE INDIA LTNEN, round
low neck, trimmed with embroidered in
sertion and Nainsook embroidery, at
bottom of skirt a cluster of tucks and
fine embroidered Nainsook ruffle; sizes
34, 36 and 3S inches, very showy.......
Henne sy's price $2,50
OF VERY FINE INDIA LINEN, square
neck, elaborately trimmed with fin«
embroidered insertion, satin ribbon and
thread lace, arms of same; on bottom
of skirl a 10-inch ruffle, cluster of tucks
and a 4-inch thread lace edging, elab
orate in detail and exceedingly swell;
sizes 34, 36 and 38 inches................
Hennessy's price $4.00
ngths
FINF
ruffle, fi
Insert 1
Th>- a.
1er
WHITE SKIRTS
OF MUSLIN, good width, finished seams,
six-inch India Linen ruffle, edged with
embroidery, length 40 to 42 inches .......
Hennessy price 75c
OF GOOD QUALITY MUSLIN, finished
seams, 18-inch flounce of India Einer»
and six-inch edging of embroidery; size»
38, 40 and 42 inches...................
Herrn ssy's price $1,25
OF GOOD QUALITY MUSLIN, finished
seams, six-inch India linen l'ufile, two
rows of Toiehon Lace Insertion and
three-inch edging, full width skirt. 10
inc-li flounce.........................
Hennessy's price $1 35
(),F FINE CAMBRIC, extra wide, finished
•rims' India Linen ruffle, two rows of
'White Torchon Lace Insertion and wiilo
Lace edging round bottom;
0, 41 and 42 inches.............
Hennessy's price $3,50
CAMBRIC, 11-inch India Liner»
e tucks, two rows Embroidered
anil five-inch good quality
Lace, well finished seamsj
38, 40 and 42 inches.............
Hennessy's price $3.50
iF EXTRA FINE CAMBRIC, cut extra
wide, 11-inch Inlia Linen ruffle, with
seven tucks and 10-inch extra fine quäl«
ity of Embroidered Edging, elaborately
., oi ked. A well finished garment: size*
40, 41 and 42 inches'.........'............
Hennessy's price $4.00
OF FINE CAMBRIC, cut extra wide. 24
inch flounce of India Linen, four rows of
good Thread Lace Insertion and edgings
of Lace. A showy skirt and a good one,
too; sizes 3S, 40 and 42 inches...........
Hennessy's price $4.50
OF EXTRA FINE CAMBRIC, cut extra?
wide, 15-inch ruffle of Inilia Linen. 15
tucks, extra fine quality, 10-inch India?
Linen Embroidered Edging, topped with
narrow Etmbroidered Insertion; sizes 38,
40 and 42 inches .......................*
Hernessy's price $5.CO
OK EXTRA FINE CAMBRIC, cut extra
wide, 18-inch India Linen ruffle, very
full, trimmed with two rviws Lace In
sertion, Vandyke scallops, edged with
fine Thread Laee, five inches wide; size»
40, 41 and 42 inches, very- swell .......
Hennessy's price $6.50

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