OCR Interpretation


Daily inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1881-1901, February 06, 1899, Image 1

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053057/1899-02-06/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Those Good Tailors
G.PALMER & CO.,60 E. BD'WAY
Daily Inter Mountain.
Those Good Tailors
G.PALMER & CO.,60 E. BD'WAY!
VOL. XVIII. NO. 266
BUTTE, MONTANA, MONDAY EVENING. FEBRUARY 6, 1899.
PRICE FIVE CENTS
We Have some
extra $
Under- t
values
in
I good
' wear for this week.
IF Heavy
Wool, Fleece
Men's Underwear at
Lined
55 OtsJ
Per Garment ^
- I
of the I
£ This is but one
it many good things of jii
S which our new store is ^
Sfull. ?
£ jju I
^ Men's Suits and Over- ^
*-coats at very tempting I
Sand Surprisingly
(The Siegel
Clothing Co|
r....... ,
Men's, Boy's and Children's. |
£ Head to Foot Furnishers. £
IF S
I GOB. MAIN AND GRANITE |
S I
i
i
%
Î
I Marvelous
I Beauty in
I Cut
I Glassware
A large and attractive line, so far
superior in depth of cut, elegance
of design, brilliancy and whiteness
as to cause nothing but favorable 4
comment.
I Elegant
I Beyond
I Comparison
i
I
ï
f
Ï
With any line ever displayed in the
west. Pretty enough to fully repay X
1 walk of blocks to look at. 4
I
I Dazzling
(Window
Display
I
On exhibition at the Moder:
Jewelry Store, at prices as much
below those wanted elsewhere as
the goods are In point of elegance
above those of the ordinary dis
plays.
t
J. H. LEYSON
Jeweler and Optician
221 N, Main St., Butto
S
^
j^'
4
5
♦'I
S
I
*
J!
%
4
5
s
I
Î
s
4
%
4
i
s
Si
List Sent
Of the Men Who Were
Killedat Manila.
SOME MONTANA BOYS
?
jju I _
^
I ^ ere Among Those Who Received
Fatal Injuries—
Another Attack Has Been Made By the Insurg
ents—Report of Gen. Otis Has Been Received.
Washington, Feb. G.—Admiral Dewey
cabled the navy department today:
''Manila, February 6 th, Secretary of the
Navy at Washington: Insurgents have
attacked Manila. The Boston leaves to
day for Iloilo to relieve the Baltimore
which will return to Manila.
''Two men were wounded on board the
Monadnock, one seriously. (Signed)
"DEWEY."
Minnesota All Right
Minneapolis, Minn., Feb. 6 .—The follow
ing message was received by Governor
Bind from Col. Ames of the Thirteenth
! Minnesota at Manila:
"The regiment still acting as provost
j guard. There is no occasion for alarm.
No casualties. City quiet."
Fled to Canada
Montreal, Feb. 6 .—Aguinaldo's Philip
pine representative arrived hero at 0:45
this morning.
Their Views Differ
Washington, Feb. 0.—Army officers be
lieve Dewey's despatch received today is
a belated cablegram, while naval officers
believe it refers to a second engagement.
LIST OF KILLED
AND WOUNDED
,
department:
Washington, Feb. 6 ,—The following re
port from Otis was received at the war
Manila, Feb. 6 .—The following casual
ties:
First brigade, First division, Tenth
Pennsylvania:
Major E. Briorer, wounded slight.
Lieut. Albert J. Buttermore, flesh
wound, slight.
Sergeant Joseph Sheldon, slight flesh
wound.
Private Thomas Conger, abdomen pene
trated, serious.
Private Edward Caldwell, lung pene
trated, serious.
Private Debait, flesh wound, slight.
First Montana:
Private Reynolds, slight wound in ears.
Charles Rummels, flesh wound, slight.
Corporal Hayes, missing, probably
killed.
Private John Sorenson, head wounded,
i probably dead.
I Private Mayerstlck, lungs penetrated.
! ser * ous -
I Corporal I. Skinner, slight wound.
First Colorado:
j Private Orton Twever, wounded in left
; thigh.
j Charles R. Morrison, wounded In left
hand.
Maurice Parkhurst, wounded In pulse.
I
C. D. W 7 hite, missing, supposed to be
drowned.
Elmer F. Doran, killed, shot in chest.
Corporal William H. Erie, wounded in
left cheek and arm.
Charles Carlson, shot in head, killed.
Charles B. Poyee, flesh wound.
First South Dakota:
Privates Horace J. McCracken, killed.
Fred E. Green, killed.
Wm. Z. Lewis, killed.
Benjamin Phelps, wounded, right thigh.
Corporal Eugene E. Stevens, wounded,
right thigh.
Private W. F. McClain, wounded, hip.
Private Harry Fay, wounded, knee.
Corporal Carl H. Osgood, sprained
knee.
Private A. Haskell, wounded in neck.
Third Artillery:
Sergeant Bernard Shap, wounded, leg,
slight.
Private Crian Ryan, shot in head, seri
ous.
Edward Lundstrom, shot through the
hand.
James Gleason, flesh wound, slight.
Further reports will follow.
Signed. OTIS.
Officials of the war department nay the
report has been delayed owing to the
extreme care which Otis exercised in
dealing with this matter. Details furl
I nished by Otis, they say, can be relied
upon in every particular.
A second bulletin received from Otis
contained a list of casualties in the Ma
nila fight. The general seems to have
abandoned the style of report he adopted
in the first bulletin, and instead of giv
ing a. statement of casualties by brigades
he appears to have summarized all of the
killed in the second bulletin, in addition
to the eight mentioned as killed in the
first bulletin along with the wounded.
The second bulletin contains a list of
46 dead, making in addition to the pre
vious bulletin a total of 50 killed in the
battle of Saturday night and Sunday.
The second dispatcii follows.
Manila, Feb. 6 .—Additional casualties
killed in action:
Fourteenth Infantry:
Corporal B. Soden.
Henry F. Thompson.
Private Jesse A. Hale.
Maurice L. Seaman.
Louis V. Dietz.
James Harveymight.
Charles W. Douglass.
Frank --.
H. Issinghausen.
Charles Seitz.
Alphonso Bonner.
Peter N. Storment.
Sixth Artillery:
Private W. A. Goodman.
First Idaho:
Major Ed McConville.
Corporal Frank B. Calwerel.
Private James Fraser.
First California:
Private J. J. Dewar.
Private Tom Bryan.
Private Joseph Maher.
First Washington:
Private Ralph Simonds.
Private George B. Reichart.
Private Frank Smith.
Private Mattias Cherry.
Private Sherman Harding.
Private Edward H. Perry.
Private Walter N. Hanson.
Private Arnold H. Moyckel.
Wounded in action. Fourteenth infan
try:
Sergeant Samuel Boadler.
Corporal Janies Neary.
Musician Joseph W. Osberger.
Private Dixon Everett.
Michael Kennedy.
Augustin Berry.
Benjamin A. Harbour.
Hugh P. McClellan.
Herman Steinhagen.
O. J. Wright.
William Sloan.
Arthur I.. Osleurn.
Richard Hughes.
Albert K. Barth.
Died of wounds:
Lieutenant James W. Mitchell, Four
teenth infantry.
Private George W. Ball, First Idaho.
Col. William C. Smith, First Tennessee,
died of apoplexy at the head of his com
mand on firing line.
(Signed) OTIS.
Where They Came From
Lieut. H E. Calkins,
mental adjutant of the
formerly regi
First Montana
giment, gives the following as the com
which the wounded men he
I.
panies to
longed :
Corporal Skinner Co
Corporal Hayes Co. C.
Private Itunels Co. H.
Private Reynolds Co. C.
Private Sorenson Co. L.
Private Mayersiek (Jo. I.
THE ATTITUDE
OF AGUINALDO
New York, Feb. 6 .—A dispatch to the
Herald from Washington says: Senator
Davis, chairman of the committee on for
eign relations, is confident that tlie treaty
will lie ratified.
• i cannot see how it can bo otherwise,"
he said last night. "It has been made
perfectly apparent by the attack of Agui
naldo's forces upon the United States at
Manila that what we have asserted from
the beginning is true, and that the Fili
pinos have been encouraged to believe,
t>\- what lias taken place in the senate,
that no treaty could or would he made to
bind the insurgents. That has been the
position of the alleged representatives of
the Filipinos here from the beginning.
From the aspect of our relations to the
Filipinos there should not have been a
moment's hesitation about the ratification
of the treaty and the events of yesterday
prove it. By our protocol with Spain, our
freedom of action was restrained in every
^ty as to territory and military opera
noiis. We should be released from that
restraint at the earliest possible moment.
It is very unfortunate that the opponents
of the treaty could not see this until its
demonstration upon
United States."
NEAf
the
forces of the
-
IS
o
READY
32
oik of prepar
o
o
i for her long
nT
goes on with
<<
o are in charge
r
I that the troop
The galvanized
are all In place
New York. Feb. 6 .—
ing the transport Sh
voyage to the Philii
unabated vigor. The
of lliis task are dete:
ship shall leave on t
iron frames for the
now, but have not. had the canvas laced
to them yet. The Sheridan finished cool
ing last night and also received a good :
part of her ballast. The latter was trails- j
ferred to her from barges. It is said that
the date for sailing is February 14. The
troopship will can y the Twelfth infantry,
which is now at eJfferson barracks, St. !
Louis, and the Third battalion of the Sev- j
enteenth infantry, at Columbus, O. The
arrival of the Third battalion In Manila
will reunite the regiment and bring it up
to its full strength. The Twelfth regi
ment is expected here on February 0.
Quartermaster M. L. Horsey and Quarter- ;
master Sergeant C. L. Lindsay have ar
rived to arrange for the reception of the
regiment on the Sheridan. The trans
port Obdam, which came up from West
Indian waters a few days ago, will return
on Wednesday. She will touch at San
Juan and Santiago, and her passenger
list lias been filled for some time.
GENERAL WADE
FAVORS EXPANSION
Chicago, Feb. 6 .—In referring to the
situation in Cuba, Brigadier General
James Wade, who is en route to St. Paul,
where He goes to take command of the
department of the Dakotas, which posi
tion lie hohl previous to going to Cuba,
said :
"I do not think the United States need
anticipate any trouble there. Gomez's
last communication to the president, in
which lie accepts the terms offered by this
country, has practically settled that, as
far as the insurgents are concerned. The
benefits which will result to this coun
try through the late campaign will lie
enormous, and, I believe, have been gen
erally under, rather than over-estimated.
I believe most firmly in the policy of ter
ritorial expansion. I do not think that
increases of the standing army to 100,000
men will give us more than we need."
When shown the dispatches from Ma
nila, giving an account of the attack on
tlie American forces by the insurgents,
General Wade said:
"Well, that looks like business. Of
course there is nothing left to do now but
to fight, and T don't think there can ho
any doubht as to the result. Of course it
is to be regretted that hostilities have
commenced, lui t it certainly does not
seem to have been the fault of the Amer
icans. I suppose tiie Filipinos thought
from our apparent unwillingnes to fight
that we were afraid of them. They prob
ably have discovered their error."
Further than this, he was unwilling to
discuss the Manila matter, saving he was
without any knowledge of the real situa
tion of affairs.
CALIFORNIA MEN
WHO WERE VICTIMS
Ran
Francisco, Feb. 6 .—James Joseph
Dewar of Company K, First California
regiment, who was killed at Manila, was
26 ypais of age and had been for several
years in the National Guard. He was
horn in San Jose but his parents moved
to San Francisco when he was hut a few
months old. His father is dead, but his
mother, Eliza Dewar, lives in this city,
with his brother, Robert M. Dewar. First
Lieutenant Hogan, who is reported seri
ously wounded, was formerly connected
with the telephone company and fire de
partment here. He was married shortly
] before his departure for Manila. He re
! cently served as chief of the Manila tire
he- department, having been given that
place by the provost marshal, Brig. Gen.
Hughes. He is now acting captain of
Company 1 . Capt. Joseph Mosher, also
wounded, is commissary adjutant of
Company T. He is a well known member
of tin* Olympic Athletic club and a clover
boxer. At Manila lie organized an ath
letic club and gave exhibitions. He is
six feet, two inches in height and a heavy
weight. Sergeant L. Wall of Company M,
First California, who was slightly
wounded, was employed as n clerk in the
general freight office of the Southern Pa
cific raliway when the war broke out.
the
at
The Washington Wounded
Spokane, Wash.. Feb. 6 .—First Lieut.
Edward K. Erwin, of Company A. First
Washington volunteers, wounded at
Manila, was horn in Wisconsin 34 years
ago and was a book publisher. He has a
wife and son aged a year and a half liv
ing here. Privates Klein and Green,
Company A, were enlisted at Tacoma.
Private Oscar Howards, Company A, was
enlisted at San Francisco. Privates
William E. Fait and Rchaird P. McClain
are well known youg clerks.
I
I
;
!
j
j

'
j
I
î
]
j
!
1
i
j
;
!
!
i $
;
Terrible Story of Cruelty
Seattle, Wash., Feb. 6 .—Advices from
the Orient state that a Canadian woman
who joined the China Inland mission as
to j the wife of Rev. Rynhart. a Belgian
the 1 —•—* 1 J '
of
the
a
our
missionary, has just reached Tachieulu
with a terrible story of cruelty and suffer
ing among the fierce mountain tribesmen
of Thibet. Her husband was brutally
murdered after their son had died from
exhaustoin. She was chased like a hunt
ed deer for two months through the
mountains on the border of China and
Thibet. She was shot and pelted at from
the cliffs from overhead, but finally es
caped. She anil her husband were attack
ed while attempting to cross into Thibert
Hennessy s
:
j
!
j
;
©
in
as
lie
on
Of
ho
it
to
Men s Shoes
FOR SLIPPERY PLACES
Many persons dislike rubbers because
they make their feet tender and sore.
Now some genius has devised a shoe,
with an insert of rubber for the sole and
heel, that is the ideal shoe for rainy and
snowy days and icy payments. These
shoes are made of the best Kangaroo
Calf, lined with Calf and finished in the
best of style.
Regular price $6.00
This week only $4.85
Black ('loth Over Gaiters for women at
25c a pair.
of
of
is
M,
The New
American Beauty
Line of
White Semi-Porcelain
At Special Price' for Monday and Tuesday
Our Basement Bazaar is one of the
most popular shopping places in Butte,
because it contains so much that is de
sirable and good for all housekeepers. To
draw a crowd on Monday and Tuesday,
and make it interesting for everybody,
we offer the most durable Porcelain on
the market, a Porcelain that is as thin as
china, in the newts shapes and of the
finest quality, at the lowest prices ever
mentioned in this state. Every piece
guaranteed aganist cracking or crazing,
and as we shal have these same goods
right along, new pieces can be bought at
any time to match your broken set.
Notice These Figures
BREAKFAST PLATES—
Seven-inch, only 10c each.
TEA PLATES—
Six-Inch, only 8 c each.
PIE PLATES—
Five-inch, only 6 c each.
FRUIT SAUCERS—Only 5c each.
COUPE SOUPS—Only 10c each.
CREAMERS—Only 15c each.
SUGAR BOWLS—Only 35c each.
OATMEALS—Only 9c each.
PICKLE DISHES—Only 20c each.
SAUCE BOATS—Only 20c each.
TIUN OYSTER BOWLS—Only lie eacli
CUPS AND SAUCERS—
Thin Teas, per pair 10c.
Thin Coffees, per pair 13c.
Your choice of two shapes.
PLATTERS—
8 -inch, only 15c each.
10 -inch, only 2 Ro each.
12-inch, only 40c each.
"BAKERS"—
7- inch, only 15c each.
8 - inch, only 25c each.
9- inch, only 30c each.
INDIVIDUAL BUTTERS—Only 3c eacU,
COVERED DISHES—Only 55c each.
BONE PLATES—Only 8 c each.
at
a
Men's Underwear.
I When chilly blown the blast see that
I you are warmly clothed. Get the right
; kind of Underwear as a starter and top
! off the rest of your clothing with a good
j Ulster or Fur Overcoat; then what care
j you ? /
UNDERWEAR
• Mt ii's Scotch Wool Shirts and Drawers,
' natural color, all sizes, this season's
j regular price $ 1.00 each .................
alo Price 65c
I Men's Heavy Camel's Hair Shirts and
Drawers; shirt of double thickness
î and warranted not to shrink ...........
Sa e Price $1 50
A lot of Men's Underwear, odds and ends
] and broken sizes .........................
At Half Pt ice
j Men's Australian Lambs' Wool Shirts
! and Drawers, winter weight, natural
1 color ................................... î
Sale Price S!.25
In the better grades of Men's Under
i wear, commencing at $2.00 or $2.50 a gar
j ment, we have a magnificent assortment
; which gives you a wider choice at lower
! figures than are obtainable in the state.
! Non-Shrinkable Underwear at $1.50 anil
i $ 2.00 a garment that it will pay you to
; see.
HALF HOSE
as
Heavy Wool Half Hose in Camel's Half
and natural wool ........................
Three Pair* for 50 a
Men's Wool Night Shills, sizes 15 to IS
inches for 75c each.
Men's Sweaters. All Wool, in blue,
black and maroon, going at $1.50 each.
Men's Gloves and Mitts, lined and un
lined, 75c to $1.25 values, closing out price
50c.
Men's Caps, several styles, 75c to $1.00
values, for 50e each.
» HENNESSY'S
BUT1E, MONT.

xml | txt