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Daily inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1881-1901, February 23, 1899, Image 4

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053057/1899-02-23/ed-1/seq-4/

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1000 Pairs
OF
50c oo the $1
Oxfords and Strap Sand
als in all the New Spring
_ _ .
Styles, Tan and Black, the
entire lot without reserve,
, , , r 4
Wl 11 be sold for
Call early and get the first
!
Choice.
--- !
Red Boot Shoe Co.
Butte, Mont.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers 1
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<♦>

jsPOT
...CASH!
▲ v»
IS HARD !
But where it rules is£
the Best Goods for£
ithe Least Money. 1
Fancy Butter ................. 20c ▼
<î>
Fancy Eggs ................... 25c $
Fair Bread Flour, sack....... 90c ^
Extra Bread Flour, sack......$ 1.15 <t>
10 Pounds Onions .............. 25c $
Pure Apple Vinegar, gallon.. 25c 4
Extra Fancy Hams .......... 9? ▲
Apples ____
Pure Pepper, per pound
Raisins, 15 pounds .....
40 Bars Soap ...........
5 Pounds M. & J. Coffee
7 Cans White Cherries .
5 Pounds Gloss Starch .
16 Pounds Best Sugar .
..$1.00 to $1.35 box
.. 13c ^
. ..$ 1.00
. ..$ 1.00
. ..$ 1.00
...$ 1.00 id
... 25c ,
...$ 1.00
I L. E. COOK
$ 331 East ParK Street
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WE BUY
Cell, Repair, Store, Pack and Ship, Rent
or Exchange Furniture with you
fiuiie Excli'g. Furniture Co.
J. CHAUVIN. Agent.
42 W. Broadway,Butte
nr , i •
filiere is
In the report|
that we are taking^
on no more custo-f
mers- %
■ We have added 25 f
I per cent, capacity tof
I our plant, and can I
I supply all who want|
gas.
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48 East Broadway .4
WRECK OF THE
BULGARIA
Over One Hundred People Sup
pised to be Dead.
WAS'AN AWFUL EXPERIENCE
The Second Mate Tells of the Great
Bravery of the Crew and
of the Passeugers.
Baltimore, Feb. 22,-The British steam
ship Vittoria, Capt. Wetherell, arrived to
day from null, via Hamilton Roads, and
four of the crew from the missing Ham
burg- Ami rican liner Bulgaria. The res
cued mariners are: Second Mate C.
Scharge, Quartermaster Carl Ludtke,
John Schultz and Seaman William
Starke. These were picked up by the Vit
toria from an open boat from the Bul
!* aria three and a half homs after they
! had been cast adrift in latitude 40 north,
longitude 11 west. These, with the 25
! women and children who were picked up
by the steamer Weehawken and landed
in Ponta del Gada, Azores, a week ago,
are all that have been heard of the clew
of so nun m n and Upassengets which
Bulgaria had on board when she sail
of
72
to
1 th
i ed from New
i Capt. Weth
I the Bulgaria
i 5 a. m., Feb. 5
York for Bremen Jan. 28.
Tell said that he sighted
in a disabled condition at
flags hying and the Wee
j hawken standing by and communicating
I with her. There was a heavy sea on and !
the vessel drifted away from the disabled j
craft, but he again locate-d her. He saw
j the* men aboard the crippled siiip attempt
to lower a boat and just as four of them j
got into it it broke loose from the steam- j
er and drifted away, i ne four men made i
an e-tlurc to row back to- tne Bulgaria, but !
couid not reach her on account of the
high seas, file Vittoria was preparing to
lower a boat to go to the assistance of :
those on the Bulgaria when the" four men
came alongside. After considerable dif- i
ticulty they were taken aboard. j
1-»tiling a lull file second officer of the'
Bulgaria, accompanied by six of me '
crew of the Vittoria, manned the boat
just vacated and started for the sinking
steamer. They were scarcely away
from the side of the Vittoria, however, be
fore another gale began ar.d the brave
fellows, not being able to reach the Uul
gaiia, found it impossible to return to tne
Vittoria until several hours had passed.
Capt. V e th trull would not abandon hop.- ■
of being of assistance to those on board
the ill-iated vessel and lemained in sig.it
of her until nightfall, when a perfect hur
ricane arose and carried the waiting ship
nines away. In the mo.n'ing the Bulgaria
was not to be seen and the Vit Lena pro
ceeded on her journey. T he story of the
exp-i'i nee of ihe Bulgaria as told by Sec
ond Officer Scharge is a thrilling one.
"On Feb. 1, at about 3 p. m., a hurri
cane of such a sever, nature was en
countered that it was found impossible to
make any headway. At 2 a. m., the fol
lowing day we were forced to heave to.
fore and aft,
amen and pas
sengers were a IT aid to venture on deck
for fear of being swept into the sea.
About 7 a. ni., the spring in the rudder,
which is used to break the strain of heavy
seas, collapsed and soon afterward the
entire steering gear etas washed away.
The steamer then feiil in the trough and
was left at the mercy of the wind and
waves. Sea after sua swept over us," con
tinued Scharge, "smashing in the doors
of the cabin and deck houses, hooding the
main deck, washing in the awning deck
and creating havoc all over the ship. To
make matters worse, 100 horses that were
stabled on the upper forward deck stam
peded, and in their wild fright made a
wild dash, trampling cac-h other to death.
This state of affairs lasted until all but
20 had been killed or drowned in the wash
lowing day we were forced
The Hying bridges, both
were carried away and a:
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V
M
|i| I There is a
widespread
and false im
press i o il
that a man,
in order to
be a good
physician, must be
more or less heart
less. People mis
take heartlessness
for nerve. The two
terms are far from
synonymous. A
man may have a nerve of steel and a heart
as tender as a mother's.
Of all the specialists in the world, there
probably are not two that have as wide an
experience in the treatment of women's
diseases as I>r. R. V. Pierce, chief consult
ing physician to the Invalids' Hotel and
Surgical Institute, at Buffalo, N. V. With
the assistance of his staff of able physi
cians, he has prescribed, in the past thirty
years, for many thousands of women. Dr.
Pierce is pre-eminently a sympathetic phy
sician. Perhaps more than any other man
in the profession he realizes the hardships
of woman's work, and the disadvantages
under which she labors because of the
weak, delicate and susceptible structure of
the feminine organism. Ilis immense prac
tice in diseases peculiar to women forced
upon ilis recognition the fact that women
would never take the proper care of their
health, so long as that care required tiie
repugnant "examinations" and "local
treatments-" insisted upon by nearly all
physicians. After years of study lie invent
ed a remedy now known as Br. Pierce's
Favorite Prescription that is an absolute
and unfailing cure for tiie most complicated
and obstinate cases of diseases peculiar to
women. This wonderful medicine cures in
the privacy of the home, and does away
with tiie necessity for obnoxious "local
treatment." It imparts health, strength,
vigor and elasticity to the organs distinctly
feminine and fits for wifehood and mother
hood.
In paper covers, 21 one-cent stamps; cloth
binding, 10 cents extra. Dr. Pierce's Com
mon Sense Medical Adviser. Address Dr.
K. V. Pierce, Buffalo, N. Y. ,
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of the waves. Then the butcher of the
vessel, with a number of seamen, went
into the pen and tried to quiet the beasts
that remained. This failing, as did also
the attempt to force the frenzied animals
overboard, their throats were cut. Before
the maddened animals were dispatched,
however, the butcher had both hie legs
broken and one of the seamen was badly
injured.
"Any idea that our troubles were
over was soon dispelled when it was
found that the vessel was leaking. All the
hatch covering had blown off and before
they could be replaced, four of the seven
holds filled and all had considerable
water in them. The cargo next shifted,
listing the steamer heavily to port. For
72 hours passengers and crew worked like
slaves, throwing cargo overboard to
lighten the ship, but it was of little avail.
Inch by inch, foot by foot, the ship settled
and as she sunk deeper and deeper the
waves broke freer over her. The waves
carried away eight life boats and with
these went much of the hope from the
hearts of the passengers and crew. At 4
o'clock on the morning of the 5th the
order was given to call all hands on deck
to prepare to take to the small boats. The
water had llooded the engine room and
four pumps could not keep it down. It
was then up to the grate bars, but the j
firemen still managed to keep the fires
burning. Each passenger and seaman
was given a life preserver and the re
maining boats were gotten ready and pro
visioned. Shortly after daylight the three
steamers (the Weehawken. Vittoria and
Koordistan) one after another hove in
sight. The Weehawken was the first
to be of service as she sent two boats
in which 25 women and children were
placed. These were landed safely on
the Weehawken, but after that the
storm increased in violence. One of
our boats was smashed and it became
almost impossible to lower another on
account of the vessel being 1 so far down
on the port side and correspondingly
high on the starboard, where the re
maining boats were made fast. Another
attempt was made and one was success
fully gotten into the sea. I and the three
men who were saved with me jumped
into lier to take the oars when by some
unfortunate accident we were cut loose.
The men on the vessel were seen after
that to try repeatedly to lower another
boat, but without success."
The second officer stated that through
out the conduct of the crew and passen
gers was excellent. The women were es
pecially brave. He thinks there is little
likelihood that the Bulgaria weathered
the storm that night, as sh" was sinking
when he left her. The Koordistan, the
third vessel that saw the distress of the
Bulgaria without being able to be of any
assistance because of the tempestuous
seas arrived in Bremen on the 19th inst.
and reported that the Bulgaria hail
foundered. Second Officer Seharges is
reasonably positive that no more were
rescued from the ill-fated vessel after ho
left here and it is feared that 101 per
sons went down with her. The Bulgaria
had no accommodations for first-class
passengers and all the pasengers on board
were in the steerage. They were mostly
Germans from different parts of the
United States. She was not a regular
liner and had been in the service of the
Hamburg-American line about a year.
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STEAMSHIPS TO
BE SUBSIDIZED
San Francisco, Feb. 23.—Two lines of
steamships subsidized by the Chilean
government may soon lie making regular
trips between Valparaiso a.r,d San Fran
cisco. Tiie private s •cr; iary of Chilean
Consul Ta gel said:
"The. Chilean South American Steam
Navigation company and the British Pa
cific Steamship company are both ne
gv.tiating to extend thtir service to San
Francisco .the lines to be subsidized l»y
the Chilean government. Both lines,
under subsidy, ran until recently from
Valparaiso to Panama, but now tiieir
vessels come as far north as Oer.s, Guate
mala. We are now endeavoring to secure
a dock in this city, but ore being opposed
by the Pacific Mail people, and the nego
tiations are still pending."
Other enterprises, having in view tiie
development of Chilean industries, are
being planmJ, and Consul Tagel looks
for a great increase in Chile's com
merce.
WAS PROMINENT
IN SOCIAL CIRCLES
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New York, Feb. 23.—Mrs. James T.
Soutter, a member of an old and promi
nent southern family and well known in
society here, in the south and Europe, is
dead, aged 84 years. She was born at
Fredericksburg, Va. Her father was
William A. Knox. They lived on an estate
called Roscobcll and later Mrs. Soutter
lived on her estate on the banks of the
Rappahannock in Virgina. She was
widely known and entertained on a large
scale.
Miss Knox was married to James Sout
I ter and came to New York to live. He was
! president of the Bank of the Republic. Ho
j was also president of the Old Dominion
j society and was trustee for many widows
I and orphans of the south. Although by
I birth and inclination his sympathies were
J with the south, he was opposed to the
war. Despite this, his estates were oon
I fiseated by order of the war department
I and an order, was issued for his arrest.
He fled to Europe and remained there un
til the war ended. His property was re
stored to him by President Johnson.
Of Airs. Souttei's childron, one daughter
married Capt. Charles M. Fauntleroy of
! the United States navy and afterward a
j captain in the confederate navy. Another
daughter married Rev. Morgan Dix. A
: son was in the confederate army, and an
I other son was in the confederate navy.
Another son, James, married Julia E.
Brown, daughter of the late James Brown
of Brown Brothers, bank- rs. Mrs. Soutter
lived abroad many years. Her husband
died in Paris in 1873 and since that time
she has made her home with lier dautfhter
at the Trinity rectory.
Di§crimination Must Cense
j Ottawa, Ont., Feb. 23.—At a meeting of
I the railway commltte of the privy council
I the question of Grand Trunk and
i Canadian Pacific railway discrimination
against the local oil companies in favor
of the Standard Oil company came tip for
discussion at length. The committee
unanimously decided as informal judg
ment that discrimination must cease and
objectionable tariffs be revoked.
.
BOUmeln
THE CHINESE
^MINISTER
Speaks on the Conditions in
the Far East.
RELATIONS WITH AMERICA
Whiie Friendly Would be More so If
it Were Not For the Exclusion
Act Now in Force.
New York, Feb. 23.—Speaking at the
Washington's birthday banquet of the
society last night, Wu Ting
Fang, the Chinese minister, said he had
heard of Washington and reveTed his
memory. When a boy in China he had
understood that Washington had confined
himself to the country which he gov
erned. His successors had done likewise.
A change had come, however, within the
last year. There were those who accused
President McKinley of imperialism. The
president's idea of imperialism means
civilization and liberty. For himself he
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would add the qualification of fairness,
to m>en of all parties, wit août regard to j
their race or color
The United States now possessed the j
Philippines. There was a discussion j
whether or not this country should keep |
them. The hesitation was commendable, ;
because it showed a noble spirit. A j
costly gift bestowed upon an ignoble
man would be accepted by him without I
question. The Philippines were near j
neighbors of the Chinese empire and his
people would rather have friendly neigh
bors than unfriendly ones. The trade of
this country with China was increasing,
and with the establishment of our gov
eminent in these islands this trade would
be greatly increased.
There was one obstacle that stood in
the way of thoroughly friendly relations
with this country ar.el China, and that
was the Chinese exclusion act. This leg
islation was brought about because of
the Impression the people of this country
had obtained of the people of China from
seeing the poorer classes of laborers
in San Francisco. He believed the estab
lishment of closer relations between the
two countries would tend to do away
with this prejudice and the abolition of j
this law. China is constructing a rail- I
road from the north to the south and had
practically thrown open the doors to i
the trade of all the world. The people i
of the United States would be welcomed !
by the merchants of China with open i
arms.
A Prohibitionist Talk
New York, Feb. 23.—Prof. Samuel
Dickey, chairman of the National Pro
hibition committee, speaking at the pro
hibition conference last night, said there
were five classes against which the pro- 1
hibltionists had to light. They were the ;
dealers, the drinkers, the cowardly busi-_____
ness men, the politicians and the coward
]y Christians. The preacher paid a glow
tribute to Secretary Long of the navy j
for the open stand that he had always i
taken on the liquor question and contrast- !
ed the fact that President McKinley al- |
lowed liquor to come into the White
house. He said that Mr. McKinley was
one of the Christians who wer.- afraid to
carry out his feelings in regard to the use j
of intoxicating beverages.
Lnurier Will Not Talk
Ottawa, Out.. Feb. 23.—Sir Wilfred
Laurier, when asked if he had anything
to say as to the outcome of the meetings
of the international emmission, stated
that he must decline to be interviewed on
the question.
"The statement given to tiie Associated
Press at Washington a couple of days ago
by Senator Fairbanks and myself," said
j Sir Wilfred, "is authentic and may lia
I taken as correct. Further than this T can
I not say anything and must positively de
! cline to speak for publication."
MINING STOCKS.
]
THE HE WETT- SISLEY CO., MINING
stock brokers, represent Hayden, Stone
& Co., Boston, Mass. Orders executed
for cash or margins on all copper
stocks. Quotations received every five
minutes. ,We handle mining stocks in
all par's of the world. 47 East Broad
way, Butte, Mont.
MONEY TO LOAN
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MONEY TO LOAN, IN ANY AMOUNT, 1
on chattel security. I. Wiley Bontrager !
& Co., 47 East Broadway.
If You Want
to Get a
Good Clock
Free
of Expense
Buy Your Goods at the
Utah Cash
Grocery
330 South Main Street,
and we will give you
one. J. G. BROWN,
Manager
WANT APVS
2 Cents Per Word for First Issue
1 Cent Per Word After First Issue
$1.00 Per Line Pa.' Month.
EMPLOYMENT.
AGENTS WANTED—GOOD LIVE MEN
in every locality to represent a large
manufacturing company and introduce
their goods. Steady employment and
large income in good legitimate busi
ness assured to men that are honest
and willing to attend to business. Ref
erences required. Send self-addressed
stamped envelope for reply to The Rex
Manufacturing Company, No. 228
Chartres street, New Orleans, La.
IF
WANTED—MEN TO LEARN BARBER
trade. We positively guarantee $60
monthly after only eight weeks' prac
tice. Spring rush soon. Students from
a distance assisted with transporta
tion. Tools presented. Write at once.
Moler Barber College, Minneapolis,
Minn.
HAVE YOU $20 OR UPWARD AND
want to make money in an absolutely
safe plan of speculation, where the
profits will continually be from 30 to
50 per cent monthly the entire year?
Send for full particulars; best of refer
ences. Write for handsome booklet, j
'with illustrated system, free. National
Turf Investment company, 167 Dear
born .street, Chicago.
WANTED
books to
block.
-ONE OR TWO SETS OF
post. Room 32, Silver Bow
WANTED—TWO EXPERIENCED
sewing machine men. Singer office, 10
West Quartz street.
BUSINESS CHANGES,
FOR SALE PRINTING OUTFIT COM
plete. Inquire 104 South Wyoming up
stairs.
WELL BUILT 3
room brick on a lot 35x 110 feet. Also a
corner lot lying next to it. Car lin-e
runs by tiie house. Can sell house and
both lots for $1,360 $600 cash and the
balance on time. The coiner lot is
woith $500. Reynolds & McDowell, 46
East Broadway.
-çyj,- HAVE A NEAT
WE HAVE TWO 3-ROOM BRICKS
with sewer connections and fine stone
basements. Also frame cottage. All
facing street. The three rent for $4S. a
month. Can sell for $2,300. $600 cash
and the balance on time. Reynolds &
McDowell, 46 East Broadway.
FOR SALE—GOOD PAYING RESTAU
rant. Sales per day $25.00. Room 47, Sil
ver Bow Block.
FOR SALE—23 ROOM LODGING AND
boarding house. Good location. John
son, Reid & Kennedy, Owsley Block.
FOR SALE—16 ROOM LODGING AND
boarding house. North Side. Johnson,
Reid & Kennedy, Owsley Block.
FOR SALE—24 ROOM LODGING
house. Steam heat and fine location.
Johnson, Reid & Kennedy, Owsley j
Block.
busi-_____
pOR SALE—FURNITURE OF A GOOD 1
FOR SALE—35 ROOM LODGING
house. Steam heat and all modern im
provements. Johnson, Reid <& Kennedy,
Owsley Block. „
three room house for $17;> and house for
rent for $16.50 per month. Furniture
cost $350 and in use only a short time.
A bargain. Chas. L. Smith, 23 West
Granite street.
FOR SALE—20-ROOM LODGING
house $900; half interest $450 confec
tionery store $325; ranch $1,300. Room
No. 5, 34 North Main street.
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\VK HAVE A 16-ROOM STEAM HEAT-j
ed, centrally located higli-ciass lodging <■
house which we can sell for $l,i00, part
cash. House has two bath rooms and
is fitted up with electric lights and all
other modern conveniences. The rent is
only $30 a month. The furniture ar.d
carpets are extra good. Every room
rented. There is a certain profit in the
house of $100 a month. Examine this i
property and you will buy it. Reynolds
& McDowell, 46 East Broadway.
for sale—the FURNITURE OF A
: large house. Good as new. Call from 9 to
i 12 a. m., 843 W. Broadway.
! FOR SALE—FOR $4,000 A 600-ACRE
j ranch with government patent. All
j fenced in, good water right. Cause of
! selling poor health. J. G. Baily, Lima,
i Mont.
C. M. PALMER OFFERS HIS ELE
! gant residence, 333 East Broadway,
three blocks from Main street, for sale
i at a sacrifice to an immediate customer.
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FOR SALE, CHEAP—QUANTITY OF
household effects, consisting of elegant
$50 cooking range, brass mounted bed,
complete; handsome sideboard, with
bevel mirror; walnut cabinet, dressing
table and commode; elegant 8-foot-high
wall mirror; extension brass iamp, with
onyx stone table; 6-foot extension din
ing table; rocking and dining-room
chairs and two carpets. Apply Gregor
& Co., Parrot block, Park avenue, Ana
conda.
FURNISHED HOUSES
WANTED—FOUR OR FIVE ROOM
furnished or unfurnished house on
West Side. Address A. L. M., Inter
Mountain.
FOUR ROOM FURNISHED BRICK.
Piano included $31.50. Address E. M.
Inter Mountain.
WA N TED—T WO ROOM S, FU RN ISHED
or unfurnished, for housekeeping. Box
124, Inter Mountain.
If You Want the Most
for Your Money, Buy
KEMMERER COAL
ÆErf&asm
Throw Prejudice Aside and Reason for Yourself.
S. J. MONROE City °Teïept-ione 53S? dWaV
Yards Intersection iWizona and l'tab Streets. Telephone ci-40
MISCELLANEOUS.
IF YOU WANT TO SELL. OR TRADE,
furniture. We buy second hand goods
of any kind. We will give good cash
prices. 336 South Main street.
HAND FINISHED CRAYON AND PAS
tel work, per bust, $2. 320 East Park
street, upstairs.
ALL KINDS OF NEW AND SECOND
band goods bought and sold. We buy
anything. 342 East Park street.
HOME MADE RAG CARPETS MADE
to order. 309 South Montana allev.
FURNISHED ROOMS.
NICELY FURNISHED ROOMS WELL
heated and lighted, reasonable, well lo
cated 121 South Wyoming stret.
TWO FIRST CLASS FURNISHED
housekeeping rooms for rent. Inquire
216 South Wyoming.
NICELY FURNISHED ROOMS, GOOD
location. Reasonable prices. 10 South
Montana street.
FIRST-CLASS ROOMS FOR HOUSE
keeping. Newly furnished, bath and
light. 319 South Montana street.
FIRST CLASS FRONT ROOM, WELL
furnished, modern improvements, h ait,
bath, and light. 316 West Galena
street.
ELEGANTLY FURNISHED ROOMS
electric lights, steam heat, etc., Talent
block, Park, nw corner of Wyoming.
NICE FRONT ROOMS WELL FUR
nished, heated, good location. 214 South
Jackson street.
MILLER BLOCK,
street. The only
house in the city.
551 SOUTH MAIN
first-class rooming
Everything new.
WALLACE BLOCK JUST BUILT OUT
side rooms for $12 per month. 327 East
Park street.
ELEGANTLY FURNISHED ROOMS
well heated, electric lights, free baths,
everything new. 108 N. Montana St.
FOR RENT—2 FURNISHED ROOMS,
at 435 East Mercury street.
NEWLY FURNISHED ROOMS ELEC
tric lights, free baths, etc., 205 South
Arizona. Transients solicited.
NICELY FURNISHED
rent. 332 East Park.
ROOMS FOR
FOR RENT — GOOD FURNISHED
rooms, cheap. 107 East Broadway.
FURNISHED ROOMS, 101 WEST
Granite street, well heated. Mrs.
Smith, Proprietress.
FOR RENT—FOUR FURNISHED
rooms. Electric light and bath. 225
South Jackson
TWO NICE FURNISHED ROOMS
with bath 402 N. Montana corner of
Copper.
I----
MANTLE BLOCK UNDER NEW MAN
. gement. Electric light, eteam heat an>l
bath. 16 V. Broadway.
X. L. N. T.—COMFORTABLE SITTING
room. Prompt tails. Steam heat and
electric lights. 27 South Main. Bed*
25c and 50c.
FOR RENT
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FOR RENT—A LARGE STORE AND
house combined. Apply 11 E. Granite
street.
FOR RENT—THE RESTAURANT OR
cafe privilege in the new Dorothy block,
corner of Granite and Wyoming streets.
Apply to Granville Stuart, 107'i West
Quartz street.
FOR RENT—FOUR ROOM HOUSE NO.
718 South Montana street, $17. See next
door south or rooms 12 and 14, 23 West
Granite street, upstairs.
MUSIC.
E. J. PASMORE—PROFESSOR OF
sin?ringr, organ and piano. Studio 101
E. G ran!to street.
MILLINERY.
HARVARD MILLINERY, 114 WEST
Broadway, has opened hair-dressing
and manicuring parlors. We also do
first-class dressmaking at 114 V..
Broadway.
MEDIUMS.
MME. GUY, 203 S. DAKOTA STREET.
Circles every Tuesday and Friday even
ings.
ASSAYER3.
A. B. ROMBAUER, ASSAYER AND
chemist. 103 E. Broadway, opposite the
McDermott Hotel.
LOST.
LOST—BROWN AND WHITE DOG,
name on collar "Tramp. Return to
Mrs. May Vrooman, 109 South Dakota
street, and receive reward.
LOST—$20.00 REWARD WILL BE PAID
for valise and contents, missed in th.«
Lenox lodging house Dec. 21. Send by
messenger to Inter Mountain office and
no questions asked. The deed is worth
less, but its early return may save you
some trouble.

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