OCR Interpretation


Daily inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1881-1901, February 28, 1899, Image 1

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053057/1899-02-28/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Those Good Tailors
G.PALMER & CO.,60 E. BD'WAY
Daily Inter Mountain.
Those Good Tailors
G.PALMER & CO.,60 E. BD'WAY
VOL. XVIII. NO. 285
BUTTE, MONTANA, TUESDAY'EVENING. FEBRUARY 28, 1899.
PRICE FIVE CENTS
What You Pay
For a thing is important, but what ■
you get in return for your money is
ten times more important. Ordin
arily the best clothing costs a great ■
deal more than poor clothing, but ■
at our present prices you can buy
an
OVERCOAT
SUIT, OR
PAIR OF PANTS
At practically the same cost as the
poor kind.
UNDERWEAR
We have a specially fine line of
Derby Ribbed all wool underwear
on sale this week at
$1.20 a Garment
j
See display in our Granite
window.
The Siegel
Clothing Go.,
Men's, Boy's and Children's
Head to Foot Outfitters
Igor, main and granite!
? I
<jk I
treet x !
:
^ I
i
j
:
I
1
!
!
I
I
j
1
I One-Fifth Off:
J.H.Leyson's|
;jj j
i- j
:i)l !
4 j
Jl
'
i
(Pc 4'
SB ^
? Annual Stock-Taking T,
? Discount S„l„ Î
Discount Sale
Commences Monday, Feb. 15th,
offers an unusual opportunit
buy
Bargains in
Diamonds
Jewelry
and Watches
S
5
s
I
.1
i
s
I
!(<■■
SB All of our magnificent stock is in
Jtfj eluded—not a single piece is except- 7,
6 ed. Every article marked in plain i.
4 figures at prices known to be the S
:£ lowest (quality considered) to be 5
4 found in the city. From these '
an f d f, !
y to ß j
11
I
Sj
s
!
s
!
found in the my, r rum tnese x*
prices for this sale we pledge you |
é> our reputation to give you
$
! A Discount of
20 Per Cent.
!
f ;
4 :
ß
6' 1
4 '

s
5! n- „„„ nf.u „«v , ... '4 I
■0 Or one-fifth off our regular selling 7. ■
ill
j
I
Î
J. H. LEYSON
Jeweler and Optician
221 N, Main St
Butte a
Î
i
,
{
;
i
ft_________
j#
One-Fifth Off
f |
I
T
j'kets.
5 1
CALLAOFjRED ON
By Filipino Artillery Concealed in
the Brush.
1IUU.
And
Sent Three Shells Into the
Insurgent Ranks.
ANOTHER BUTTE
BOY WAS WOUNDED
In
the Trenches at Caloocan—His Name is
Moore and His Injuries Are Se
vere—Dewey's Request.
Manila, Feb. 28.-10:10 a. m.—The reb
els at Malabon fired upon the cruiser Cal
lao from the jungle yesterday while Ad
miral Dewey was visiting the Monad
I nock. Three shells were dropped by the
I monitor into the Malabon church, de
! molishing the structure and killing a
: number of rebels who were inside.
I A factory at Malolos is reported to be
i running day and 1 night to supply am
j munition for the insurgents. The ignor
: anee of the natives is shown by the fact
I that they have collected empty Spring- ]
1 field shells and are refilling them. Over j
! 2,000 of these cartridges were discovered j
! in houses in Pandayean by an officer of
I the Washington volunteers.
I The cruiser Charleston and the gunboat
j Concord have gone on a ten days' cruise,,
1 presumably looking for fiiibusterers. It i
is believed that arms are being landed in ;
small quantities at northern ports.
Everything was absolutely quiet last
night, both inside and outside the city.
The commissioners appointed by Presi
dent McKinley to study the conditions in
the island are expected to arrive here on
Saturday.
ANOTHER BUTTE
SOLDIER WOUNDED
j Washington, Feb. 28.—The following re
j port has been received at the war de
! partaient:
j Manila, Feb. 2S.—Additional wounded
' February 26th, in entrenchments before
Caloocan :
i Twentieth Kansas—Private Howard A.
Olds.
Thirteenth Minnesota—Private Andrew
J. Meldle.
First Montana—Company G—Private
E r aM "■***
I
!
j
Tenth Pennsylvania—Privates Gilbert
Cuite, J. A. Htnnessy.
Additional in Tondo and Binondo dis
tricts February 22nd and 23rd.
Thirteenth Minnesota—Privates Ira D.
Smith and John Hartfield.
Second Oregon—Company E—Private
Martin Hildebrandt, finger, (slight.)
Additional near San Pedro Macati, Feb
ril, n y 18th and 27th:
First Idaho—Private \Vm. H. Lillie.
First California—Private Charles F.
Bushman. (Signed.)
OTIS.
Arms From Japan
...
Mani,a sa >' in s thirty cannon
Madrid, Feb. 2S— Reforma asserts it has
! received letters from reliable sources at
0,000 rifles
and several million cartridges from Japan
; have been landed at Sual, on the gulf of |
: Lingayen on the west coast of the island
of Luzon and about one hundred miles
1 from Manila, and have been taken thence
to Malolos, the seat of the rebel govern
ment. The Reforma adds: "Japan evi
I dently intends to act towards the Ameri
■ \ ... . *
cans in the Philippines as the Americans
j acted towards Spaniards in Cuba."
DEWEY SENDS FOR
COALING BASKETS
NAVY DEPARTMENT OFFICIALS IN
THE DARK AS TO THE REA
SON FOR REQUEST.
that of Friday last, which caused such ex
New York, Feb. 28.—A dispatch to the [
Tribune from Washington says: The
navy department has received the follow
| Ing cable dispatch from Admiral Dewey:
I "Secretary of 'he Navy, Washington—
Require three thousand steel coaling t>as
j'kets. DEWEY."
1 As this was the only dispatch that had
been received from Admiral Dewey since
a
citement, it caused a great deal of relief
in the naval department as it indicated
that nothing very startling had happened
in the naval line in Manila since the pres
ence of the Oregon had been requested for
"political reasons," but at the same time
every one was as much in the dark re
garding the admiral's request for such a
large number of articles that have never
been used by the navy as they were three
days ago regarding the urgent necessity
for the Oregon's presence.
j
i
There was much speculation as to why
Admiral Dewey could not purchase all
tlie the ordinary coal baskets he wanted
in Hong Kong and there was a disposi
tion to first find out whether he would be
able to use more than 1,000 baskets if
he had them. Officers doubted if the ad
miral would ever require at. one time
more than 100 laborers each with a bas
ket, considering the character of the
wharfage facilities at Cavite where a
larger number of coal heavers might op
crate than at other smaller wharves.
Officers say they have never seen any I
steel baskets. Large bags holding eight !
or tan bushels were used most of ■
the time and especially from lighters
where baskets had been used. They are
of the ordinary construction, costing
about ten cents each and having the ad
ditional advantage of floating when they j
fell overboard, as they frequently did. i
It is believed that some of the foreign
ships at Manila must be equipped with ,
baskets made of steel which have
. - , ,
traded Admiral Dewey's favorable no- 1
tice for none are known in the commis
sary in this country. Patent baskets
I the smaller size have more than once 1
been pressed on the notice of the naval
authorities but they have not been pur
chased on account of two serious objec
nous, that of great expense and inability:
to float. They cost from ten to fifteen
times as much as a wheat sack.
Admiral Dewey, during the years from
1889 to 1893 purchased the coaling baskets
the navy needed and none of them werè
of steel. However, the confidence of the
navy department in the admiral is sueh
to carry a conviction that he must have
sufficient reasons, whether political or
not. for everything he asks and an ef
fort will be made to send the three thou
sand steel baskets.
Assigned to Duty
San Francisco, Feb. 28.—Six second
lieutenants in the reguiar army, Just
graduated from the military academy hi
West Point, have aimed here on their
way to Manila to join various tegular in
fantry regiments. Eleven other officers
of the same grade will arrive in a day nr
,
,
i
j
I
I
j
I
!
;

two. Those now here are R. W. Calver
Yot k,
g oul h
ton, Indianapolis, assigned to the Eigh
teenth infantry; Wm. T. Merry, New]
Twenty-third; Jesse
Dakota, Thirteenth infantry;
Charles Brooke Clarke, Milford, Mass.,
Twenty-third infantry: James Justice,
Washington, Twenty-third infantry, and
C. H. Bundell, Fourth infantry.
Desultory Firing
Manila. Feb. 28.-4:35 p. m.—There has
been the usual desultory firing along var
ious parts of the line, Hut the only cas
ualties today are Captain David S. El
liott, Twentieth. Kansas volunteers, and
a private of the same regiment. Both a-re
seriously wounded. They were shot by
the enemy's sharpshooters near Caloocah.
A battalion of the Twenty-third infap
try relieved a battalion of Califorrtia
volunteers at San Pedro Hlacati today,
The latter will be ordered to embark on
the transport St. Paul tomorrow.
Hanson,
Kverythinfg is Quiet '
Washington, Feb. 28.—The following oa
blegram was received at the war depart
ment:
Manila, Feb. 28.—A battalion of 23rd
infantry sailed for Cebu on the 26th in
stant. A batallion of California volun
teers sails for Negros tomorrow. Every
thing is quiet here the past three days.
(Signed)
OTIS.
Rumor Is l>eule«l
Washington, Fern. 28.—It is said at the
war and navy department there is no
truth in the rumor set afloat that Dewey
fired on German vessels.
HOSPITAL SHIP
READY TO SAIL
SHE WILD CARRY MEDICAL SUP
PLIES AND A NUMBER OF
PHYSICIANS.
Neu York, Feh. 2S.—Orders have been
issued to the hospital ship Relief to sail
for Manila at the earliest possible mo
ment and to make as great speed as will
be safe. It is stated that she will start
on Thursday afternoon. This is sooner
•■nan was thought possible a week ago.
The engineer of the Relief thinks she can I
reach the Philippines in 44 or 45 days. The j
boat has frequently made seventeen
knots. The Relief is taking on supplies:
and will coal today. The first orders were |
for the Relief to sail on Feb. 15, but the
severe weather hindered the work of j
renovating the boat. For the long voy
age heavy strengthening beams have been
pnt in the upper works. All the machin
ery has been put in good shape and a
new propeller fitted so that she can make
good speed.
Maj. A. E. Bradley, surgeon in the reg
ular army, is in charge of the Relief. His
(staff is composed of Capt. H. R. Stiles,
Lieut. N. P. Chamberlain and Drs. \V. P.
Read, C. Van Wagoner and H. C. Row
land. Lieut. G. L. Irwin of the Fifth ar
tillery is the quartermaster of the boat.
The Relief Is to carry a hospital corps of
150 enlisted mon and seven women nurses.
The following go as passengers and are
to lie assigned to the various hospitals
in the Philippines: Lieut. S. L. Steers. TI.
S. A., and the contract physicians, Dr.
Edmundston, Fogg, Anderson, Gilchrist,
Cullen and Bishop; Second Lieut. W. S.
Brown, recently graduated from West
Point, will go as a passenger to Join the
Third infantry to which he has been as
signed. The Relief's cargo will consist of
enough medical supplies for 25,000 men
for a year.
The work of refitting the transport Ber
lin is going on and she will he ready to
sail for the West Indies on March ,10. The
transport Burnside will sail in about ten
days. She will take 200 recruits from
Governor's island to Havana. They will
be in charge of Capt. Brewster, of the
quartermaster's department. The Obdam
will sail tomorrow for Ponce and San
tiago.
i
j
I
!

j
RACE WITH DEATH
WAS SUCCESSFUL
WALLA TONAKA WAS REPRIEVED
JUST IN THE NICK OF
TIME.
Feb. 28.—The race with
Antlers, I. T
death of the courier of United States i
i Judge Clayton's court for the life of!
Walla Tonaka,t he condemned Choctow In- !
, dian, W as won by a hair's breadth by
. ,------...V... — .... .......... ,-----
dian, was won by a hair's breadth
the courier, who made the wild ride from
1 „ '
Coutil McAIester to Aliktehi. Walla
ofiTonaka was to have been shot Monday
1 morning for the murder of his uncle and
came to the execution grounds as he had
p. ,,mised to do, he having been at liberty
pending final action bv the court,
i, as t week a reprieve for a rehearing of
;u le oase was ordered by Judge Clayton
land the courier dispatched on the S0-mile
journey. Rain was falling in torrents and
there was every reason to fear that ho
, could not reach Alikiehi. The first part
of the journey was very bad and he had
but one broncho to carry him the dis
, (ante. It was after midnight Sunday
i morning when the rider reached the
flooded Kianuchi river. Here he stopped
j iHi daylight and with his hand on the
pommel of his saddle, swam the stream
I with his pony. The pony was almost ex
I hausted when Big Creek was reached and
a long detour was necessary which eaus
j cd hours of delay. Night came and more
I rain and when the Seven Devils Hills was
reached the broncho was staggering, lie
f. 11 to the ground with the rider and both
! slept where they fell. Before dawn they
wore up again and finally the broncho
; hearing the courier staggered to the exc
< ution grounds where tin*
land stolid Walla Tonaka were facing
death. The Indian heard his reprieve
executioners |
without comment and will appear before I
judge Clayton forthwith.
Senate Proceedings
place on the calendar of a bill of the
same title previously reported.
Senatorial Ballots
is
- , .
Washington, Feb. 28.-AN hen the senate
convened today Frye, chairman of the
committee on commerce, reported the
shipping subsidy bill "with a good many .
trictive amendments." It took the
of
at
Utah. F< 1). 28.—King 6, McCtine 23. Neb
ker 8. Rideout 2, Cannon 8, Sutherland of
»... - * r
11. Absent 5.
Pennsylvania, Feb. 28.—Quay 85, Jenks
67, scattering 44. Paired 57.
Nebraska, Feb. 28.—No change.
Great Falls Hank Dividend
Washington, Feb. 28.—The comptroller
of the currency has declared a dividend
of 5 per cent in favor of the creditors of
the Northwestern National bank of Great
Falls, Mont.
The Oregon Sailed
Honolulu, Feb. 21.—The battleship Ore
gon, aeompanied by the collier Iris, sailed
for Manila on February 20.
by
FLAG FLO
OV
S
GUAM
Hoisted by Commander Taussig
on February l.
HE IS THE GOVERNOR NOW
Stories of Revolt Against American
Authority Arc Pronounced
Pure Fiction,
San Francisco, Feb. 2S.-Tlie steamer
Gaelic from H ong Kong and Yokohama,
. TI , . , ,
via Honolulu, arrived today. The Asso
elated Press at Honolulu sends the fol
lowing news, dated February 21:
Commander T.mssig of the Bennington
;
is the first American governor of Guam.
The American flag went up over the new
possession, at 10:30 a. m. on February 1.
It was raised over Fort Santa Cruz, in
the harbor of San Luis d'Apra, the main
harbor of Guam. The paymaster of the
Bennington is the United States collector
of revenues for Guam. Everything is
quiet and orderly. The American flag
was also raised over W ake island by
Commander 1 aussig.
The United States collier Brutus nr
rived at Guam from Manila on January 1
and sailed from there at 5 p. m. February
1, first having coaled the Bennington and
particlptaed in the flag raising ceremo
nies. Captain Cottman of the Brutus
says all the stories of revolt in Guam
against the United States authority fol
lowing tlie departure of the Charleston
are pure Action.
THE POPE TAKEN
SUDDENLY ILL
MAY INTERFERE WITH CELEBRA
TION PLANNED FOR NEXT
THREE DAYS.
Rome, Feb. 28.—The pope was taken
suddenly ill this morning.
Leo XIII will be just 89 years old day
■after tomorrow, and, curiously enough,
on March 3 occurs Hie twenty-first anni
versary of Ills elevation to the apostolic
chair. The pope is now but four years
away from the proverbial "years of St.
* c 1 ' ^c-oorilInjg t° the Catholic church,
the first bishop of Home presided over the
destinies of his flock just a quarter of a
century. It is seldom that a supreme
pontiff can celebrate the twenty-first an
niversary of his coronation. And only
■once has it happened among the 258 popes
that the "years of St. Peter" were
reached. This exception was in the case
of Pius IX, who found himself the center
a world-wide demonstration of loyalty
" lH ' n ,1< ' attained the twenty-fifth anni
^ X?I?^ lirge.'ydue'to^hc fact
that he is an enthusiast for frugality.
The pontificate of Pius IX was the
longest in history, and was terminated in
1878. On February 2 he gave his last allo
cution to the cardinals, and live days
POPE LEO.
afterward died very suddenly. On Feb
ruary 18 the sacred college met in solemn
conclave, and two days later Cardinal
Joachim Pocei was proclaimed the new
pope, under the name of Leo XIII. The
cor ma tion ceremonies took place In the
basilica of St. Peter's, on March 3, 1878
The pope is the oldest living man in the
world in active official life. In this conn
try General Cassius M. Clay of Kentucky
is within a year of Leo s age. One reason
why the pope enjoys such excellent and j
nearly uniform health is because of his
frugal diet and model menus. H.s physi
cian says: "1 eat in one meal more than I
the Holy Father does in a week." This J
tells the story better than anything else.
Here is the general routine of the pope
during one day: Leo rises about 6 in the
morning, after five hours' sleep, and is
assisted in dressing by his old and faith
ful valet. After mass is said he partakes
of coffee and goat's milk, with a bit of
bread. The secretary of state is received
at 10 o'clock to consult regarding affairs
of the church. Half way through J,^ e
morn np the nnno takes some hrnth. Thp
morning the pope takes some broth. The
midday meal is eaten about 1:30, and con
sists of soup, boiled meat, roast lamb and
some vegetables as a general thing. Of
course, claret or chanti is not lacking.
Then comes the afternoon siesta. This
over, his holiness again resumes work,
and later on takes a drive through the
Vatican gardens. Here he can be easily
seen from the dome of St. Peter's and
frequently his every movement is covered I
by field glasses in the hands of tourists. I
For very few people are admitted to the j
presence of the pope, nor can they easily
secure admission to the Sistine chapel :
when he officiates at mass. In the even
ing a light supper is eaten, and then his
holiness studies or reads till far into the
night.
Hennessys
«
B
^/MEf^ CÄ L | A D lNG (pfTSEv.
I
T DOESN'T TAKE AN EXPERT
corsetiere to appreciate, nor a fash
ionable modiste to know that a well
fitting high grade Corset is necessary,
to the successful style or graceful*
draping of an elegant gown. Most of
Women appreciate it more or less, and
j those who have studied the question the
j rnnst arc today wearing the celebrated
! " La vit1a " Corset, which has created
"La Vida''
; such a furore in Europe and America.
: French fashion makers say: Economize
■ if you will in the matter of fabrics fop
your gown, but buy a good corset, for
| therein exists the secret of an ideal fig
lure,
tlle i, cd ter grades, of which we have over
W. B. Corset
America's Leading Corsets
W. B. Corsets guarantee a perfit fit ancB
graceful appearance to every figure. They,
will lengthen and reduce the apparent
size of waist measurement from one to
two inches without repression with the
greatest amount of comfort because
they are cut and modeled on our own. 1
original and patented plan of transverse
seams with double zones following the
natural curves of the body and running in!
a diiection to prevent undue strain on the
weaker parts, thus moulding the figure to
lines of grace and elegance in a perfectly
healthy, easy and really comfortable
manner.
STYLE 656 is made of French Sateen,
well boned, in black and drab, has full
hip proportions and is admirably suited
to figures inclining to embonpoint ...... .
Only $1.50 each
There is r.o corset made and retailed at
$ 1.00 that can compare with the W. B. In
twenty, there is a variety of styles, to
suit every figure and every purse. Each
one the best that can be produced for the
price.
STYLE 412 is made of a good quality of
Sateen, well honed and trimmed with
Silk Embroidery. In black and drab,
with five and six hooks, In all sizes, 18
to 30 ....................................
Only $1.00 each
STYLE 443 is made of a fine quality of
Sateen, in black and drab, with boned
1 list, flossed with Siik. trimmed with
Silk Embroidery, four hooks, all sizes ....
Only $1.25 each
THE W. B. MODEL, 650, is made of
Black Figured Italian Cloth, daintily
trimmed at the upper and lower edges
with Lace and Ribbon. A beauty .......
Only $3.50 each
X L
L,
.-.Vol
"KABO CORSETS
99
Some twenty or more styles in thia
popular "Kabo" make arc shown in our
Corset Department this week. All the
i,est of these leading styles are ready for
your inspection.
g-pyLE 372 as shown in above cut is
ma( j e c f fi ne French Sateen with four
hooks and handsomely trimmed with
lace and ribbon at upper and lower edges
_ . _ . „ ,
Only $l.20 GcLCll
STYLE 423 is made of fine French Sateen,
four hook, short hip, elastic sides, dain
tily trimmed with Lace and Ribbon ...
Only $2.00 each
STYLE 110. made in black and drab, well
boned and of good value...............
Only $1.00 each
STYI j,; 205, as shown in the above cut, is
01 1 LjlÀ - •'» .... ____ . .
made in drab and black. The special
feature of this Corset is Its bust, light
and flexible and of a natural form.
Shoulder straps act ns a brace and taka
the weight of skirts off the Hips........
Only $1.50 each
There is every convenience in Hen
nessv's store for fitting Corsets and other
garments; stiKtly P f , s thur St no
are bore, and e\ei> (. i • Jov, mit,
or more can P ,0 P ei 'J
.extra cost.
*
ü HENNESSY'S

xml | txt