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Daily inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1881-1901, March 18, 1899, Image 1

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1
11113
VOL. XVIII. NO. 301
BUTTE, MONTANA, SATURDAY EVENING, MARCH 18, 18
PRICE FIVE CENTS
8 CltANIT
a/
Vr
A Main Feature oi Our New
Spring Line is Our
Spring
Overcoats
I We show the new Eox Cut]
■ or the conservative full'
; lengths.
New Shades '.n Thibets, Vi
cunas. Coverts and the!
new Herring Bone effects.
$ 7 . 5 '), $ 12 . 00 , $ 15 , $ 18 , $22
The Siegel
Clothing Co.,
Men's, Boy's and Children's!
Head to Foot Outfitters,
COR. MAIN AND GRANITE
•?9)$
$ The acknowledged pinnacle of per
HAWKES
I CUT GLASS
jjj feetion in the glass-cutter's art.
beautiful
!Beyond
I Description
? One of the very few makes, each
Jfc
<J> piece of which bears the maker's
name and trade mark. The name
ft" Hawkes on a piece of cut glass is a
? positive guarantee of unrivaled
3! beauty and absolute perfection.
9
iPersons of
iRefined
$
%
I.......................................
$1 week's gorgeous window display of
^ the world's most noted and exten
Taste
Are specially Invited to inspect this
I Artistic CutGlass
221 N, Main St., Butte
At the Modern Jewelry
House of
J. H. LEYSON
Jeweler and Optician
NIANYJ'ERISHED
In the Fire That Destroyed the Wind
sor Hotel, New York.
Before the Full Number of Victims
is Known.
THREE REMARKABLE ESCAPES MADE
Husband Lowers His Wife and Daughter by a
Rope and Then Saves Himself—
List of the Killed.
4
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ft'
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s
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I
$
1
New York, March 18.—Flames which
originated from the Igniting of a lace
curtain burst forth from the second floor
of the Windsor hotel, at Forty-seventh
street and Fifth avenue, shortly after 3
o'clock yesterday- afternoon, just as the
St. Patrick's day- parade was passing the
building, and in a few moments they- had
leaped to the roof and enveloped the en
tire Fifth avenue and Forty-seventh
street fronts of the hotel. Ten minutes
later the flames were roaring through the
interior of the hotel and aii escape by
means of the stairways and elevators was
cut off. There was the wildest scene of
excitement within and without the build
ing. Hundreds of guest.« and employes
were in the hotel when the fire broke out
and for many of them to escape with
safety- was impossible. Probably from
10 to 15 lives were lost within lia If an
hour, and 30 or 40 persons were injured
in jumping from windows and in rushing
through the roaring flames in the corri
dors and the stairways. Many who were
injured died later in near-by residences
and at hospitals, and others who made
wild leaps to the stone sidewalk were so
badly injured that they are still hovering
between life and death. It may- be 24
hours or more before the complete list
of fatalities becomes known, and it will
be. longer than that before it can be as
certained definitely liow many- charred
bodies are in the mass of fallen masonry
that marks the spot where the hotel
stood.
J
i
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i
$
:>J>
4
$
$
^
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5
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PEOPLE COULD NOT
FIND THE STAIRS
1
J
New York, March 18.—Building Inspec
tor Bunnell says he has found no viola
tion of the building laws in the Windsor
hotel.
"It was an old building, built many
y-ears ago. The rapidity with which the
flames spread was due to the fact t hat
the building was not fire proof. There
were no Are proof steps in the corridors,
smell as are required in all modern huild
I ings, and the corridors were swept by a
great draught that went through them.
How many fire escapes were there? Why,
the rear and sides of the building were
literally covered with them, and ropes
were in every room. As is usually the
case, the people were frantic from fear
and did not know enough to use the
escapes."
"Have you any criticism to make be
cause there were not fire escapes on the
front of the building, presumably be
cause it would detract from Its orna
mental appearance?" was asked.
"No," replied the inspector. "I have no
criticism to make on that score. Such
matters are under the jurisdiction of the
building department. The stairs? I
want to say right now that two-thirds of
the people who live in hotels today don't
know the location of the stairs; that is,
It would take them several minutes to
find them. The reason Is that hotel pat
rons alway-s use the elevators. The law
requires that a red light be placed at
the head of each stairway, in fact, that
every exit be marked by- a red globe. Be
sides, diagrams of exits are posted con
spicuously, but people pay little atten
tion to such things. Of course, if the
building had been fire proof it would
have been comparatively- easy to subdue
the flames. Under the present law, the
best one ever enacted, so far as the fire
department is concerned, all buildings
more than 35 feet high, which are in
tended for use as schols, theaters or ho
tels, must be fire proof."
Asked if it was true that the depart
ment had been slow in responding to the
afarm, Chief Bonner of the'fire depart
ment, said: -r > 5 /*'
,J It was not. There was a delay, how
ever, in sending in the alarm. It must
have been 15 minutes after the fire wai
discovered before an alarm was sent in.
After the alarm was sent, the firemen re
sponded instantly. It was not two min
utes after the first alarm had been sent
in until the third alarm had been rung.
The department did everything in its
power after the alarm was given."
WONDERFUL NERVE
OF ONE GUEST
New York, March IS.—Edward P.
Wells, his wife and daughter, of James
town, N. D., had apartments on the sixth
floor of the Windsor hotel on the Fifth
avenue side, and were watching the St.
Patrick's day parade when the fire broke
out. They had hardly time to realize
that something had gone wrong when the
smoke rolled through the corridors and
their escape was cut off in that direction.
The window was their only object, and
to jump was sure death. In a frenzy, Mr,
Wells besought his family to remain
calm, and he then proceeded witli great
deliberation to measure the chances of
escape. He first paid out the fire escape
rope in the room until he saw that it
would reach the ground, and then, haul
ing it back, he quickly but securely fas
tened it about his daughter's waist. He
then lifted the form of the girl to the
window ledge and slowly allowed it to
descend. He wound the rope tightly
about his hands and braced his feet
against the wall of the room, meanwhile
slowly paying out the rope to the end of
which dangled the almost inanimate
body of his daughter. Smoke and flame
shot out at intervals from the windows
below, but the passage of the girl was not
retarded, and in a few seconds she had
reached the ground. There she was
quickly taken care of by firemen, who
released her and the rope was quickly
hauled back by Mr. Wells and exactly
the same performance was gone through
with in the case of his wife, who had
meanwhile stood at his side by the win
dow.
For Ihe third time Mr. Wells pulled the
rope back after lie had seen his family: in
safety, and then made preparations, for'
his own descent. He recognized seem
ingly that it would be impossible for him
to go down hand over hand, and knowing
the lacerations that would result if he
slid down the rope, he first carefully tied
up his hands in towels. Then he clam
bered out on the window sill and swung
clear. He shot down like lightning, but
there were ready hands below to break
the fall, and when the bandages had
been removed from the man's hands it
was found that he had not even a blister
on them. A great shout went up from
the crowd as they saw Mr. Wells land In
safely. He asked far his family, thanked
the firemen and others for their assist
ance and disappeared. He found tem
porary shelter with his wife and daugh
ter with friends on Fifth avenue, and his
subsequent place of abode was not as
certained.
SICK PERSONS
ACCOUNTED FOR
New York, March 18.—Dr. Pitkin, house
physician of the Windsor hotel, lias ac
counted for all of the six bed-ridden pa
tients in the hotel, with the exception of
Mrs. James P. Stokeà, the widow of Gên
erai James P. Stokes, who he fears, is
among the dead. Twelve little girls' were
taking dancing lessons from Mrs. Dora
Gray Duncan of San Francisco, in a par
lor on the fourth floor, when the fire
started. Mrs. Duncan hurried the chil
dren down the stairs, and, with her two
daughters, was among the first to leave
the building.
ÀH Unidentified woman about 30 years
old died a few minute» after feeing taken
into the house of Mrs. A. P. Adams of 19
West Forty-sixth street. Her legs and
'breast bone were broken. It was said
by one of the employes of the hotel that
the woman was from San Francisco. She
wore a black silk skirt and a purple
waist.
Thomas P. Ochiltree, who escaped un
hurt, lost valuable pictures and brie a
brae. So dense was tiie smoke along
Fifth avenue that many people who, at
tempted to cross the street were nearly
suffocated.
CONDITION 01
THE WOUNDED
New York, March 18.— The names and
conditions of persons injured at th Wind
sor hotel fire were reported at the various
hospitals today as follows;
Bellevue Hospital—Miss Alice W. Price,
sister-in-law of Gov. Candler, of Georgia,
condition not serious; Kate Roach, do
mestic of the hotel, will recover; Mrs. C.
Simmon®, condition doubtful; Mrs. Nellie
Thomas, condition doubtful; Mrs. Leo.
Rosenthal not serious.
Roosevelt Hospital—Mrs, Eilen Brewer,
serious; Mrs. Catherine Bailey, Chicago,
serious; Mrs. Louis Wallace, not serious.
Presbyterian Hospital—Adelaide Wheel
er, improving; Do: a then Wheeler,
i
_ I
proving; Miss Von Spiegele, improving; j
Miss F. Misch, improving; Edward Skel
ton. improving. !
New York Hospital—William T. Love, i
improving; Ellen Curran, not dangerous.
REVISED LIST OF
THE VICTIMS
New York, March 18.—The most com
plete list of casualties at the Windsor
Hotel fire shows 14 persons were killed
and possibly 15 without attempting to
speculate on bodies in the ruins. Forty
persons remain missing. Fifty-two names
are in the list of injured whose » here
abouts are known. !
Three fire engines and a hundred po- j
licemen remained all night about the j
burning building. The citizens were kept j
a block away from the ruins as pieces of
]
!
I
!
j
I
the walls were falling every now
and
on the ba>k of the building and that on
the 46th street sida might fail at any
minute.
Chief Bonner said today no firemen
!
Hamilton.
j
j
wçre missing. The contractor said as soon j
an possible he would start men to over- :
haul the ruins. He would have 1,000 at j
work if that number were'needed. Re
vised list of the dead :
JOHN CONNOLLY, employe of the
hotel I
MRS ADDIE GIBSON, 35, Cincinnati.
jaii.-. aoi'ii, .
ELEANOR LOUISE GOODMAN, 1
this city.
MISS LARELLES GRANDY, Eliza
beth City, N. C.
MRS. MAURICE HENRY of this city.
NANCY ANN KIRK, Chicago.
MRS. WARREN LEI.AND.
MISS HELEN LELAND.
AMELIA PADDOCK, Irvington, N. Y. j
CTTTTTT-Ax- I
MARY . I LLIvAjn. j
Unknown man.
Unknown man who jumped from Fifth
avenue window.
Unknown child, thrown from the win
dow by mother.
Unknown woman, mother of child
above mentioned, jumped from hotel win
dow.
Unknown woman, Jumped from win
dow.
Some Accounted For
Xew York, March 18.—Mrs. Sol Smith
Russell, wife of ihe actor, who was regis
tered at the Windsor hotel, was not in the
house at the time of the fire and is safe
and well. Mis® Kate Forsythe, an Amer
ican actress, who arrived from England
and registered at the hotel, was in Phila
delphia at the time of the fire. Warren.
Lei and is at the Hotel Grenoble. His
nvntal condition 1« reported improved.
Mrs. Alfred Decordova of this city, wife
of the well known stock broker, who had
an office at the Windsor hotel, reported
last night as missing is safe.
Was Offered Money
«an Francisco, March 18.—The attempt
made today to see B. U. Steinman, ac
cused of having offered General Barnes,
the foremost candidate for the senator
ship from California, a large sum of
money for Barnes' withdrawal in favor
of Dan M. Burns, proved futile. The
Examiner, however, prints the follow
,rl "Former Mayor B. U. Steinman of Sac
ramento arrived at the Palace this even
ing from Sacramento. When told Barnes
had duly charged that he (Steinman) had
offered him money if he would withdraw
from the senatorial fight, Steinman de
nounced the story as untrue."
The Oregon Arrives
Washington, March 18.—The navy de
partment has been advised of the arrival
at Manila of the battleship Oregon.
The Batteries Ordered Out
Washington, March 18.—The light bat
teries which have been ordered to Manila
are: Battery E, First artillery, now at
Jefferson barracks, Missouri; Battery F,
Fourth artillery, now at Fort Adams, and
Battery F, Fifth artillery, now at Fort
19
a
C.
ALG
0
$ VISIT
SECTION
He Will Go to Cuba During the
Next Week.
HE HAS BEEN "JOSHED'
And is Now Trying: to Gel Away With
out Newspaper Men Learn
ing: the Exact Date.
New York, March 18.—The Tribune
says: It is aserted here by persons it is
believed are in a position to have correct
information, that Gen. Alger, secretary
of war, is planning to start on his tour
of inspection of Cuba and Porto Rico next
week. Arrangements have been made, it
i is said, to have the transporting arrange
_ I monts made by next Wednesday and the
j secretary will start for Havana. It has
been the secretary's intention to leave
! Washington quietly and to go on the trip
i before the public should learn of it. For
!
j
j
j
S'°
this reason Savannah was chosen instead
of New York as the port from which to
sail. Secretary Alger first planned to
take this trip of inspection to Cuba and
Porto Rico in the latter part of January,
and orders had been given to the trans
port officials to hold the Meade in readi
ness for the secretary and his party for
the first week in February.
Then Secretary Alger decided that the
] transport needed to lie repaired and the
! trip was postponed until March 5. Then
I the Meade went to the Erie basin to he
! refitted for the secretary. Some of the
j newspapers ridiculed the proposed
I "junket" as they called it and continued
to make so much fun of the expedition
that it is said the secretary became sen
sitive about it. When the time came to
congress was considering the army
bill and the secretary intimated that it
Washington at that time and it was re
ported the trip of inspection to Cuba had
been given up indefinitely. But it is now
! declared that the secretary has been
intention for
the publicity
[given to the plans for the former pro
imposed trip and the annoyance which it
j caused Gen. Alger, he resolved If possible
j to carry out his intention and get safely
j planning to carry out his
: we eks. Because of
j
away before it should be learned he was
I S oin R
After consultation with Col. Bird, in
. ,, , ,, , ul ' , uu ' 111
'charge of the Washington transport
bureau, it was decided that the Ingalls
should be the official transport. The In
galls was formerly the Clearwater. She
has been undergoing a thorough over
hauling and refitting in the ship's yards
at Elizabethport, where she has been for
the last two months. Everything about
Ihe boat from stem to stern is in fine con
dition. The Ingalls is not so large as the
j Meade or other transports, but she Is a
I good sea boat. Capt. Wright, U. S. V.,
j t jj G quartermaster in charge, has worked
[early and late in picking out an efficient
crew and in getting through the requisi
tions for the furnishings and supplies.
The orders are to have the Ingalls at
Savannah on next Wednesday without
fail and every detail of furnishing in the
ship must be without a flaw. The accom
plishment of this is worrying the trans
port officials.
It is planned to have the Ingalls sail
for Savannah from the transport pier in
Brooklyn at 10 o'clock on Monday morn
ing. The boat is to be provisioned for 30
days, but it is not known just how exten
sive a tour will be made. The Ingalls was
formerly in the service of the Louisiana
Lottery company when that concern was
driven out of New Orleans and had to go
to British Honduras. The steamer car
ried the lottery company's business from
Honduras to New Orleans.
ARMY IN MANILA
IS REORGANIZED
Manila, March 18.—10:20 a. m.—The en
tire American force has been reorgan
ized, two divisions of three brigades each
being formed. Gen. Lawton today as
sumed command of the first, which con
sists of the Washington, North Dakota
and California volunteers, under General
King; six troops of the Fourth cavalry,
the Fourteenth regiment, the Idaho vol
unteers and a battalion of the Iowa
troops under General Ovenshine, the
Third and Twenty-second regular infan
try and the Oregon regiment under Gen.
Wheaton, and Dyer's and Hawthorn's
light batteries. Gen. MacArthur's division
consists of two batteries of the Third
artillery, the Kansas and Montana volun
teers under Gen. H. G. Otis, the Colo
rado, Nebraska and South Dakota regi
ments and six companies of the Pennsyl
vania regiment under Gen. Hale; the
Fourth and Seventeenth regulars, the
Minnesota and Wyoming volunteers and
the Utah artillery. A separate brigade
will be assigned to provost guard duty,
consisting of the Twentieth and eight
companies of the Twenty-third regi
ments. Gen. Anderson now in command
of the first division of the Eighth army
corps, will return to the United States
in accordance with the orders of January
24.
An attack was made by the rebels yes
terday upon the battery at Lona church,
but were repulsed by the Pennsylvanians
with heavy loss. Lieut. Thompson and
Privates McVay and McCanse, of Com
pany C, were wounded.
A gunboat with a company of the
Twenty-third regulars on board, is now
on the lake attacking the small towns.
She was last b'»»' r d of off Morong and
Santa Crux.
Hennessys
is
it
to
NEW SPRING
STYLES...
In Children's Wash
Dresses
Today we show a superb assortment of
the very latest styles in Children's
Dresses. They are the prettiest styles
ever produced in Gingham, Pique, Percale
and like textures, and, without fear of
contradiction, we say they are the bright
est lot of Spring Garments ever seen in
Butte, and the price is small for such big
values.
CHILDREN'S PERCALE Dresses of best
quality, blouse waist, revers over shoul
ders, edged with embroidery, cuffs,
shoulders and body trimmed with inser
Children's Dresses
Of Gingham, in stripes and checks, new
and good colorings, trimmed witli nar
row braid, revers over shoulders, skirt
of full width, sizes 22, 24 and 26 inches..
Only 25c each
CHILDREN'S GINGHAM Dresses, fast
colors, in blue and pink stripes, cheeks
and plaids, trimmed with braid and em
broidery. Yoke of plain color GingJiatfn,
revers over shoulders- and full width
skirt, sizes 22, 24 arid 26 ................
Only 75c each
CHILDREN'S PERCALE Dresses, best
quality, dainty patterns in pink, blue
and green, cuffs of Pique, trimmed with
fine quality embroidery. Yoke of Pique
edged with narrow braid, with two
rows of embroidery over shoulder, skirt
of full width, with deep hem, fast eolor
nigs, sizes 6 to i4 Only $3.00 each
Of fine quality Toile du Nord Gingham,
m plaids, checks and stripes, blouse
waist, in plain color, revers over shoul
ders, edged with embroidery, full width
•skirt and fast colors, sizes 22, 24, 26 and
!S .........Only $1.25 each
t'on, fast colors, red, pink and blue, in
stripes and checks, sizes 22 to 26 .......
Only $1.50 each
CHILDREN'S GINGHAM Dresses, in
plaids, stripes and checks, colorings
pink, blue and green, waist trimmed
witli braid, embroidery and insertion,
full width skirt, witli deep hem, revers
over shoulders, sizes 4 to 14 .............
Only $1.25 each
Of White Pique, with blue polka dot. yoke
of plain blue Chambray, trimmed with
embroidery and fancy white braid, tie
to match, skirt is of full width, with
three rows of trimming around bottom,
sizes 8 to 14. (Skirt full width, colors
blue and pink, warranted fast ..........
Only $4.00 each
Boys' Caps
All the latest novelties in Boys' head
wear, Tams, Yacht Cap®, Fatigue Caps,
Military, Navy, Hobson anil several
otheis ...........25c to $2.00 each
Boys'Waists and BloUSeS
ral good colorings
Only 25c each
Boys' Suits
THE HOBSON SUITS, of Brown Duck,
trimmed with red, blue and yellow,
military coat and long pants, sizes 6
to 12.....................................
Of fine Percale,
and sizes .....
Only $1.50 each
THE DEWEY SUITS, of Blue Denim,
trimmed with white braid and military
buttons, sizes 4 to 8 ....................
Only $1.25 each
Swell Styles in Shirt
Waists and Fancy
Silk Petticoats.
Don't Miss the Floral
Display
On our Second Floor Today
It is the Largest Stock of Fine Flowers
(and Inexpensive Flowers, too,) ever seen
in the Northwest.
« HENNESSY'S
BUTTE, MONT.

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