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Daily inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1881-1901, April 01, 1899, Image 10

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053057/1899-04-01/ed-1/seq-10/

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A yn 1
Backache
Wearying - , ceaseless backache.
Dull, exhausting and constant pain.
No comfort by day. No rest at night.
Aches in the small of the back, pain low
down in the side. No spirit for any task, no
hope for relief. Great numbers of women are
not free from backache from one year s end
to another.
Among Mrs. Pinkham's victories
there is none more complete than
that over backache, and the evi
dence of thousands of
women prove that she
is its conqueror.
Mrs. C. Klenk, of WeHs,
Minn. (Box 151), writes:
"Dear Mrs. Pink ham — I
suffered for years- with a
long list of troubles, and I
want to thank you for my
complete recovery. Lydia
E. Pinkham's Vegetable
Compound is a wonderful
medicine for women.
"I had severe female
complaints, causing terrible
backache and nervous pros
tration; was dizzy most of
the time, had headache and
such a tired feeling. I now
have taken seven bottles of
your Compound and have
also used the Sanative Wash
and feel like a new woman.
I must say I never had any
thing help me so much. I
have better health than I
ever had in my life. I sleep
well at night, and can work
all day without feeling tired.
I give Lydia E. Pinkham's
Vegetable Compound ail
the credit, for I know it
has cured me of ail my
troubles. I would not do
without your remedies
. for anything."
When a woman
lias severe back
ache site has some
^ serious trouble
that will sooner or
later declare itself.
Airs. E. Furton, of Heade,
fiich., found that her back
ache was caused by a
tumor, which! three
bottles of Lydia E.
Pinkham's Vegetable
Compound expelled.
This is Mrs. Furton's
letter:
"Dear Mrs. Pinkham—
Two years ago I was
troubled with constant
backache and headache,
and was very nervous.
I resolved to try your medicine and took two bottles
of Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound and on
taking the third a tumor was expelled. I was a
little frightened and sent for the doctor; and he said that it
was fortunate for me that it came away. I got quite well
after that and have your Compound alone to thank for my
recovery. "(j
The safe way to guard against trouble is
to get Mrs. Pinkham's advice when the back
ache first appears. A letter to her at Lynn,
Mass., describing your case fully will receive
a prompt reply without charge.
te Your Medicine Is a Friend to Women."
"Dear Mrs. Pinkham —I wish to tell you the great good
your medicine has done me. I do not feel like the same
woman. I have suffered terribly. Had womb and kindey
trouble, leucorrhoea, very severe pains in hips and sides
of abdomen, headache, was nervous, menses were irregular.
I have now taken four bottles of your Vegetable Compound,
and the backache has left me, menses are regular, can sleep
well, and awake in the morning feeling much rested. Your
medicine is indeed a friend to women. I wish that I could
tell every woman what a wonderful medicine it is. I cannot
praise it enough."— Hrs. Anna J. Fenstermaker Pin*
Summit, Pa.
1
t
s~>
Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Com
pound—A Woman's Remedy
for Woman's Ilk.
n
»
Vf
w
THE EASTER DANCE.
THE DEVIL STEPS OUT ON THE FLOOR—
HE'S BEEN ASLEEP F OR'FORTY DAYS—
BUT NOW H'S READY FOR THE DANCE,
THE DANCE FOR WHICH THE DANCER PAYS.
THE PRETTY MAID, WIIO.FQR SIX WEEKS
GAVE UP THE DANCE, THE FEAST, THE PLAY;
HEARS THE FTRST SOUND **F REVELRY,'
AND TRIPPGTH DOWN THE DE-VIL'S WAY.
SHOES FOOLED THE BLOODHOUNDS
Fairbury (Neb.) Spei. New York Worffi:
The village of Endioott, six miles east
of Fairbury, is still excited over the tra
gedy which resulted ini the death of
Claude Cole and Herbert Grandy and
placed a shadow on the life of Mi.-s Gertie
Rickey.
Colo was murdered, Grandy was a. sui
cide and Miss Rickey is heartbroken.
Claude Cole and Herbert Grandy were
the sons, of respectable parents^— one a
teamster in Endicott, the other a farm
er on the edge of the village.
Almost since childhood they had been
together—schoolmates in their younger
days and boon companions in more ma
ture years. Grandy passed his majority
a few weeks ago; Cole was nearly a
year his junior.
For over a year Grandy has been the
accepted snit'or of Gertie Rickey, a pretty,
vivacious girl, 16 years old,, the daughter
of John Rickey, of Endicott. It is said
the two were engaged.
Claude Cole, who missed the compan
ionship of his friend by reason of the
now attachment!, was frequently thrown
in their company and enjoyed the exper
ience. He was the handsomer of the two
young men, and it was not long until Miss
Gertie found her love for Grandy dimin
ishing. She could not help showing
preference for Cole.
Grandy did not complain. lie relied on
the girl's promise to be his wife. Only
once he mentioned the matter, but it was
in a good-natured way, and Cole laugh
ed at him and chided him on his display
of jealousy. Outwardly the two were sis
fast friends as ever, but the storm 1 cloud
gathered.
On the day of the tragedy Grandy cabl
ed at the Rickey house and had a loj
talk with his betrothed. He remind
her of her promise, told her of ills bright
prospects, and insisted that she ha^e
nothing more to do with Cole.
The girl listened patiently, and, it ils
said, half promised to do as he wished.
She insisted, li owever, that she must see
Cole once more and explain her posltidti.
That evening she accompanied Cole 'to
an entertainment at Endicott Grandy
was present and quietly followed the cou
ple home. They lingered long at the
Rickey gate, and he finally approached
them and asked what it meant.
Cole answered in a joking way whiph
angered Grandy, and he loudly denounc
ed the pair. Then John Rickey came do
the door and told his daughter to eokie
into the house.
She refused, and a moment later, in the
hcait of anger, told Grandy that she pre
ferred her new-found lover, and that all
was over between them With that she
stepped between the two men and bade
Grandy good-night.
Grandy was lived with rage.
"How long do you want to live?" he
asked Cole and the girl. Both replied that
they hoped to live for many years.
Grandy drew from his overcoat pocket
a revolver, and, without another word,
threw his bund over the girl's shouider,
placing the revolver almost against Cole's
shoulder and flredt the hall penetrating
the heart.
Cole staggered through the gate to the
doorway and fell inside.
John Rickey picked him up, and ask
ed If he was badly hurt. He replied: **I
guess he's got me this time," and expired.
Grandy in the meantime grasped ths
gitj and held her. He watched Cole until
dieifell, and then turned the girl roughly
and two or three times snapped the revol
ver in her face, but the weapon was ei
ther empty or the- cartridges failed to ex
plode.
Letting her go, Grandy walked rapidly
to his father's, Mouse, where he remained
but a few moments, when he was seen by
the night watchman to leave and start
west toward Fairbury.
The Rickey household gave the alarm
and parties: were organized to hunt down
the murderer.
As an aid to the search a pair of blood
hounds at Beatrice was sent for. They
arrived next morning' and took the trail
at the- Grandy home, but instead of com
ing toward Fairbury started directly
south and finally crossed the Kansas line
The Grandy family was in a panic from
the time of the first news of the shooting.
The father said he hoped his boy would
have nerve enough to end h'i's own life be
fore he was caught, and when he learned
that the bloodhounds'were supposed to be
on the trail he was driven to a frenzy.
That afternoon a lady who was making
a short cut across the fields from Falr
bury to Endicott discovered the body of
a mar. lying in a ravine. She notified the
autnorities, who brought the remains to
the city.
They were those of Grandy.
He had shot himself, and the revolver
was found by his right hand.
The elder Grandy, when he saw the
body, smiled and repeated over and over
again: "Well done, boy, well done!"
The coroner decided an inquest unnec
essary, and the funerals of the murdered
youth and the suicide were held the next
day, both being buried in the same ceme
tery.
Shortly after the finding of Grandy's
body a report was received from Hal
lenburg, Kan., that the dogs had passed
through that city on what seemed a "hot
trail." The authorities intercepted them
by telegraph at Hanover, however, and
they returned.
The trainer of the dogs was at a loss to
understand the mistake of the animals
until thé Grandy family were interview
ed, and it was learned that on the day
previous Mrs. Grandy had given a tramp
a pair of her son's shoes and an old coat
which he had discarded, and Urns attired
he had furnished the trail which the dogs
were zealously pursuing.
Gertie Rickey, the sixteen-year-old girl
who was left desolate by the affair, has
caused unflattering comments by the
coolness she displayed through the tra
gedy.
On the afternoon previous to the shoot
ing Grandy called at her house, and they
stood in the yard for some time talking
over their differences!, he imploring her
to accept his attentions again, she stoliid
ly refusing.
He finally drew a revolver from his
pocket, and asked her to allow him to see
how close he could come to hitting her
toe. She consented and put out her foot.
Grandy fired and the ball barely grazed
the top of her shoe.
He then wanted to perforate the ruf
fle on the shoulder of her dress In a like
manner, and she stepped off a few paces
and underwent tkis ordeal without flinch
ing.
This strange scene, coupled with her
cool and collected demeanor on the night
of the tragedy, has been the subject of
much comment.
RESERVED HIS JUDGMENT.
"Now, honestly," said the friend, "have
you any respect for a member of the
legislature who will accept money?"
"My friend," said Senator Sorghum, "I
can't afford to go on record by answering
any such question. It depends entirely
on which side happens to be offering the
money."
DR. HUIE POCK
227 S. Main St.
Th-=> only pure root and herb treatment
In Butte.
Specialist in Chronic Disease of long
standing. Permanent cures made in all
Private Disease. The Diseases of Wo
men have been made a study of for
years, and are successfully treated.
J D. McOREGOl
VETERINARY SURGEON.
Honorary graduate of the Ontario Vet
erinary College, Toronto, Canada. Treats
all diseases of domesticated animals ac
cording ti scientific principles. Otîîce at
Marlow's Stables, 104 S. Main street.
Telephone 293. All case9 promptly at
tended to.
A BUTTE LODGE NO. S3. A. F. &
A. M. Regular meeting in Ma
sonic Temple, second and fourth
Tuesdays of each month Sojourning
brethren cordially invited to attend.
A SILVER BOW LODGE NO. 43,
A. P. & A. M. Regular meeting In
Masonic Temple second and fourth
Thursdays of each month. Sojourning
brethren cordially invited to attend.
Dan Yancey, Secretary.
Railway Time Tables
mi
a
TIME CARD
-OF
TRAINS.
EUTTE
EAST BOUND
No. 14. Turn City Express
No. 2, Twin City Mall,
MIXED—to Whitehall ex
cept Sunday: Twin
Bridges Tuesday, Thurs
day and Saturday: Pony
and Norris Monday and
Friday....................
WEST BOUND
No. 13. Oregon Exp ess____ 9:ü5 a. m
No.II, Pug et Sound Mail 8:05 p. rn.
1.15 p m.
y: 10 p m.
8:00 p. m .
Depart
1.29 p. m.
9:20 p. m
10:35 a. m
S: 15 p. m
Standard Pullman, first-class and
Tourist Sleeping Cars to Portland, St.
Paul, Omaha and St. Louis without
change. Trains Nos. 1 and 2 run solid
via Butte.
W. H. MERRIMAN, A. G. A.,
N. W. Cor. Park and Main Sts , Butte.
CHAS. S. FEE, G. P. A.,
St. Paul, Minn.
St. Paul, Minn.
Short Line
Southern and Best Route
to the East and West.
Dinins: Cars, Fnllmaii Palace and Tonrist
Sleepers Via Salt Lake and Denier.
LEAVE BUTTE
For the East and West.
FIRST DAY OUT
Arrive Ogden, Utah, con
necting with the Union
Pacific, Denver & Rio
Grande, and Southern
Pacific.
'Second day out
Arrive Denver, Colo.,
Queen City of the West.
SECOND DAY OUT
Arrive Omaha, Neb.
THIRD DAY OUT
Arrive Chicago, only one
change of cars from
Butte (at Ogden).
SECOND DAY OUT
Arrive San Francisco,
Cal.
For tickets, sleeping car reservations
and further particulars, call on or ad
dress No. 19 East Broadway, Butte, Mont.
H. O. WILSON, General Agent.
D. E. BURLEY, G. P. & T. Agent,
___________Salt Lake, Utah.
4:45
pm
7:00
am
8:00
am
4:45
pm
7:45
am
8:45
pm
To Kansas
City
St. Louis,
And all points
East and South.
Free reclining
chair cars to
holders of regular tickets. For maps,
folders and Information regarding tick
ets, berths, etc., call on or write
H. C. TOWNSEND,
G. P. & T. A., St. Louis. Mo.
H. B. KOSSER, E. J.FLYNN,
C. F. & P. A. T. P. A.
Salt Lake. Utah.
KansasCity
Best Dining Gar Service,
ELE6ANT EQUIPMENT.
Chair Gars Frea.
TWO FAST TRAINS DAILY.
Jordan & Whitney
, &, ypjipgaaïlfe ,
irVCKY
STX
Montana Livery
All kinds of Turnouts for Pleasure and
Business Purposes.
120 S. Montana Street
Tel. 7b, Butte, Mont.
J.E.TUITE
Dealer la
Monuments, Tablets
Copings, Etc.
In Ttalh a and American
Marble, Scotch and
American Graai'o,
Wire and Iron RaHU
lags.
âï 204 1 Montana Street
ASH LEV
Butte, Anaconda & Pacifia Railway
LOCAL TIME TABLE.
Trains Leave Butte for Anaconda as
Follows:
-----10:00 A. M.---
--—- 1:05 P. M.----
----5:00 P. M.-
-- 10:10 P. M.-
Trains Leave Anaconda for Butte:
-----S :40 A.M.--
--- U :50 P.M. t--
--3:00 P. M. ——--
-----7:20 P. M.---
ATCHISÜN, TfJPEKA & SAKTA FE
(Santa Fe Route.)
East via Ogden to Kansas City, Chicago
and St. Paul, making close connections la
union depots with trunk linos to ail points
east and south. Also the direct Una to
Galveston, Texas, City of Mexico and
points in New Mexico, Arizona und Cali
fornia.
For particulars call on R. G. W. R. R. *»
O. S. L. agents, Butte, or address
C. F. WARBEN,
General Agent, Salt Lake.
threat Northern
MONTANA CENTRAL RAILWAY.
New fast time between St. Paul, Minne
apolis, Helena, Butte, Anaconda, Spo
kane, Scuttle and Portland. Close con
nections for Kootenai country, Oregon
and California points, Alaska, Japan and
China. Connections at Twin Cities for all
points East and South.
LEAVE BUTTE.
Groat Northern Flyer, daily., ..S:30 p. m
Local for Great Falls, daily... .9:45 a. m
ARRIVE BUTTE.
Great Nor%er Flyer, daily,. ..10:30 p. m
Local from Great Falls, daily.. ..4:50 o. m
Through sleepers going East.
City Ticket Ofilce, No. 41 North Main
street. Butte. J. E. DAWSON. Gen. Agt.
A New Through-Car Line.
Get on at Seattle, Spokane, Helena,
or any other point along the main
line of the Northern Pacific—get off
at Lincoln, St. Joseph, or Kansas
City.
There is tlie actual, practical result
of the new twlee-a-week tourist ear
line established by the Burlington
and Northern Pacific railroads.
omfort and economy every foot
of the way.
Clean cars, Pullman porters, short
est line—and NO change of cars from
Puget Sound to Kansas City. Ask
any Northern Pacific ticket agent for
details, or write
PHIL DANIELS,
Passenger Agent, Butte, Mont.
BIG 4BDDTE
AND
CispaM Ohio fir
Limited Trains from
CHICAGO
PEORIA
ST- LOUIS
TO ALL
Eastern and
Southern Cities
VTA
Cincinnati and Wash
ington, D\ C.
W. P. Deppe, A. G. P. A., St. Louis.
E. O. McCormick, P. T. M. Big Four.
H. W. Fuller. G. P. A. C. & O. Rr„
Washington, D. C.

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