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Daily inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1881-1901, April 13, 1899, Image 7

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THE LYNCHING
OF BAKER
At Lake City Was Carefully
Planned.
THE STATE'S TESTIMONY
So Far Given is Very Strong—Two
Men Have Turned State's
Evidence in This Case
Charleston, N. C., April 12.—Two of the
government's most important witnesses
testified in the Lake City lynching caste j
in the United States circuit court here to- j
day. They were J. P. Newham, one of !
the men who turned s
M. W. Spring, a bicy— .-------
swears that one of the defendants asked ■
him to join the mob that killed Postmas- j
ter Baker Newham is a white man of i
ÄU« -* «r -, rr i
He used to live in Lake
p, Newham, one of.
state's evidence, and ]
' . h !
licycle repaiiei, h !
w but says he cannot
l ead and write
City, but since ho turned state's evidence,
he had been provided for in Washington.
On the stand today he swore that he
met Stokes, Webster, Alonzo, Rodgers, j
Epps, defendants, and othres at Stokes'
store. Stokes planned the lynching, pro
posing- to set fire to the postoflice and kill
Baker when he came out. It was agreed
to do ths Monday night. At that time
the men named, with McKnight. Ward
and others, went to the place. He and
Early Plee set fire to the place while the
others hid in the bushes and fired into
the place. Newham was rigidly cross
examined. but stuck to his original story.
Spring said Stokes tried to get him to kill
Balter, but lie refused to do so. Spring
was being cross-examined when court ad
journed on account of the illness of Juror
Murphy. The case made out by the gov
ernment today was a strong one. There
are nearly 100 more witnesses to lie exam
ined, but Newham's story of the crime
is the center around which the others
will revolve.
SOME 0FTHE BOOKS
ARE ADMITTED
Philadelphia, April 12.—Senator Quay
gained a partial advantage in court to
day by the apparent refusal of Judge
Biddle, for the present at least, to admit
as evidence against him the famous "red
book," which has figured so prominently
in the trial, and which is alleged to con
tain the key to the ease of the common
wealth. It contains entries extending
over several years, and figures are writ
ten in it which apparently show the cal
culation of interest on sums of money
approximating the state deposit, less
certain deductions for the benefit of Sena
tor Quay. 'Phase figures, the prosecution
alleges, were "posted" from the red book
to the regular ledger of the bank con
taining Quay's account. Judge Biddle
said that he had understood the argu
ment of yesterday and this morning to
he on the admission of all the books and
and papers, hut in view of Mr. Rother
nial's statement he would withhold his
decision on this book until it is regularly
offered and the question argued. All evi
dence practically against Senator Quay
is documentary, in the shape of letters
and hook entries, and the attitude of his
counsel has clearly indicated a purpose to
fight to the bitter end against the Intro
duction of such evidence. The failure in
this respect was not complete,.however,
as they have apparently secured the ex,
clusion of the vital evidence contained in
the little memorandum book, known for
purposes of identification as the "red
book," which gains its title from the fact
that the computations of interest in it
were made in red ink by Hopkins.
List of Casualties
12.—General Otis
following- casualty
Washington, April
lias forwarded the
list:
Killed: April 10.—Private J. \V. Pitts,
Fourteenth infantry.
April 11.—Privates Henry Payne, Ed
ward Hoffman, Joseph Boddey, Company
M, Second Oregon.
April 10.—Private A. Cole, Thirteenth
Minnesota.
April 11.—Private Morris P. Beatty.
Wounded: April 0.—Acting Hospital
Steward Bennett Altman, Hospital corps.
April 10.—Henry Foss. Lieutenant Clias.
Clark, First Sergeant Eugene Sanscom,
Corporals Holdeni G. Gilbert, Walter Ry
berg, Privates W. J. Oble, Eugene A.
Harvey, C. J. Miggeson, Charles Packett,
John J. Young, John Lichon, Harry An
JULIUS ELLINfiER & CO'S
Madge Lessing
High-Grade Cigars
■wê £
H. L.
DISTRIBUTOR
BUTTE, MONT,
darson, Richard Kelley, Adam Hotchkiss,
Thirteenth Minnesota.
April 10.—Private William Somers,
Fourteenth infantry.
April 11.—Private Joseph Grabowsky,
head (severe). Fourth cavalry.
Corporal Herman Wolf, First North
Dakota.
Private Arthur P. Larson, forearm (se
vere), First Idaho.
Privates P. Miller, abdomen, (severe);
Arthur Sullen, arm (slight), Company M,
Second Oregon.
UNCANNY LAND.
At the mouth of Trinity River, between
two narrow passes, is an island known as
Dead Man's Island. It is a patch
ground hardly more than 10 acres in ex
inac
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tent, low, and swampy, and almost mac
cessible; but it contains more grewsome j
stories and strange vegetation than any
other piece of ground of equal size in the i
whole state of Texas.
Dead Man's Island has always been
known as such as far back as the oldest
inhabitant can remember. During Mexi
can rule, and up to the time of the out
break of the war for Texan independence,
the island, and much of the land sur
rounding it, was owned by the Anahuac
tribe of Indians. Dead Man's Island is
ga jj j lave been the Individual property
of the last chief of the tribe. He was
murdered there when the Mexicans were
.pose
sonu; of Laditte's men.
From that day to this the island seems
to have been a fatal place to all who have
t=
tQ break the fatal spell, hut none so
far has been known to escape with his
life. Some die suddenly, without any ap
murdered there when the Mexicans weie
driven from the old town of Anahuac, for
treasure he had in his possession, sup
p0S ed to have been left in his care by
parent cause; others disappear my steil- ■
usly, and are never heard of again. ;
Some are murdered by unknown
ugenc-ies, others take their own lives, or
lose them by tlood or .fire, or are destroy
ed by lightning and the sudden coming of
storms.
The boatmen passing the island at
night report many strange sights and
sounds. The Indian maiden and spectral
canoe have been met by many, a mile or
'more from shore, and at such times when
their stancher crafts had all they could
do to combat the storm and waves, and |
live. Often, in sailing through west )
Pass, piercing cries, as if caused by moi- ;
tal pain, reach their ears. At othtu times, ;
usually on calm, starlit nights, ine |
sounds of mirth and revelry ifil the air. j
These things happen, and are heard and
seen, when it is known that there is no
living soul on the island.
All this is ascribed to the curse of the
old Indian chief, who was murdered for
the supposed treasure in his possession.
The scenes and sounds at night are cer
tainly uncanny enough to come from
such a source. But if the nights around
Dead Man's Island are uncanny, the days
upon it are no less so.
On the north side of the island is a
fringe of low thorny bushes, the leaves
of which, toward autumn, turn gleaming
red, hang pendent, and resemble dripping
drops of blood so closely as to startle the
beholder. The foliage is very scant, with
only two or three leaves to the twig. On
the topmost twigs hangs a large fruit,
which at a distance appears to be blue,
but which upon closer inspection proves
to be a deep purple in color, and in shape
resembles a human heart very closely.
When touched with the hand it seems to
shrink, and quivers visibly, and feels
cold and clammy. It is said that the juice
of this fruit, pressed out and prepared
in a certain way, makes a very powerful
intoxicant. The bushes, from the shape
of their fruit probably, are known among
the hunters and fishermen in the vicinity
as Indian heart, and grow nowhere ex
cept on the island.
Near the center of the island is a small
pond, around which grows a plant that
resembles the banana in leafage. In the
late autumn it bears a peculiar fruit. This
fruit is shaped exactly like a human
hand, except that it has only three fingers
and a thumb. The fingers and thumb
show the joints of the knuckles very
plainly, the tips are furnished with a
hard substance for nails, and the palm
shows the same lines that are seen in the
human hand. The part of the fruit rep
resenting the hand and wrist is coppery
in color, but the fingers are red, as if
bloody with murder. Some fishermen
claim to have eaten it, and say it tastes
like a half ripe plantain.
There is another shrub that grows on
the island which is a strange mixture.
No two leaves on it are alike in shape,
size or color. It blooms profusely all the
year round, but the flowers are of every
variety imaginable, and no two of them
smell the same, or bear the least resem
blance to each other.
The sights and sounds at
perhaps be due to old stories and lively
imaginations. But the fate that over
takes those that try to live on the island
and the strange plants that grow there
are facts which no man who has been
there can dispute.
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TALE OF A TOP PIECE.
The good Knight Sir Guillabert de Gon
zales stood rapt im thought, and ever
and anon heaved a prodigious sigh as he
thought of the fair Margaret of Araeon
and her haughty sire. 'Twas near ur.to
Eastertide, and Sir Guillabert would be
obliged to appear upon the streets of Ara
con the following Sunday morn in his old
time-worn helmet, bedent with the
strokes of many a lusty blow. And like
wise, rusty, for had it not been sent to the
H'Sdit^may
'.......
alehouse, yea, many and ofttime, in lieu
of a growler? He had no gold with which
to purchase a new war bonnet, and his
credit at the foundry in which hats were
made was gone.
Ten years of his life would Sir Guilla
bert have given could he have obtained
credit for a helmet. A soft step behind
him caused the brave knight to start. Two
dainty hands were folded over his eyes
and a sweet voice whispered in his ear:
"A penny for thy thought, mine own
true knight."
"I' faith, they are not worth so much!"
answered Sir Guillabert, as he disengaged
the maid's hands. "What dost thou on
the streets of Araeon after curfew, fair
Margaret?"
"I look for my fatheer. Sir Guillabert.
Canst tell me his whereabouts?"
"I wot not!" answered the knight. "I
raw him scarce two hours
raw him scarce two hours ago going m
Vine street carrying a hatchet and some
nal!s -
i
of
!
;
;
"Alack a day!" murmured theomaid.
"Then he has gone to help repair the
Hamilton County Republican platform
and I need not expect him home this
night! But, Sir Knight! What terrible
odor is that that permeates the air? Isn't
it offul?"
"Yea, 'tis offal!" answered De Gonzales,
" 'Tis the committee on dead eats and
garbage making its nightly rounds;!'
"An' who is the fat Squire who follows
them subserviently at a distance an' car
ries the load on his back?"
" 'Tis Troskey. He carries the oats. He
hath double his portion of labor sinus»
Jaydice Kennedy is in the parish goal."
The party turned up a by street on its
way to the canal, where it divided, one
half going toward the Gilbert-avenue
dump and the other to scour the alleys
IHÏS,«!' tod,, r-j
"Nay," answered Guillabert. "Nor do T
care to. He hath coin, and your sire !
you to marry him. On Easter
nlorn come 0 ut j,i a new bonnet,
while I, perforce, will wear mine old one,
to the crying shame of my Knight
hood."
"Nay. say it not!" c.ried Margaret has
tily. "The triecky ways of Sir Morgan
stern are well known an' I will never
marry him! Thine own war bonnet is an
honorable top-piece! 'Tis true that Mor
gariKtern hath had a new one made, and
boastoth that it holds full two pints more
than th.in'e. But I care not! He is a rep
| resen i a tive and a member of t he corn
) mittees that have just passed with their
; nauseous load. Ever in a new guise he
; a pp eargj ] )U t be cannot deceive me. Wear
| tb j ne tnvn 0 i,i helmet, and accept my
j i ove ; »•
The Knight folded the maid in his arms
j
j and straightway led her to the nearest
; night owl car, which they mounted and
: were borne to her father's castle on the
; hilltop. Well he knew that he dare not
! venture into the grounds that surround
; ed the castle, as the maid's father was a
! Cox lieutenant—or he wouldn't have own
ed a castle—and Guillabert was but a
I poor kliight in the democratic ranks, but
! honest in his convictions.
! Easter morn Guillabert spent nearly an
j hour in endeavoring to burnish up the
: fast-dimming luster of his old helmet'
! then sorrowfully placed it on his head.
! buckled his trusty sword by his side and
I meandered up Vine street. Murmurs of
j pity reached his ears as he passed Wie
: lert's, and some one remarked:
" 'Tis pity such a lusty knight'should
j have to wear such a bum helmet o n Easv
ter morn! He should join' the gang!"
"Yes," answered a stout man whom his
fellows called George. "1 offered hjm a
position as bookkeeper in the water
works office, but he would n<ot become a
republican."
"As bookkeeper in the waterworks?"
exclaimed a bystander. "Why, he is no
scribe, an' cannot read or write. He hath
no knowledge of the craft."
"He needeth no knowledge of the craft
iivthat position," answered George. "All
he needeth is knowledge of the graft!"
Guillabert paid no heed to these re
marks, but went his way. A short dis
tance further on he encountered his fair
Margaret, coining trippingly a-down the
street, becomingly dressed for the Easter
tide. She hurriedly whispered that her
father and Sir Morganstern were not far
behind her, and in a moment he encount
ered them.
PROPHETIC CHANCE WORDS.
The Paris papers are telling an inter
esting story of a newly elected member
of the French senate. M. Bassinet, like
many of his colleagues, is a self-made
man, and began life as a journeyman
mason. In that capacity he was em
ployed to renovate the sculptural facade
of the Luxemborg palace, when the
architect, noting his skill and industry,
I said to him by way of encouragement:
, "Why, you couldn't be making a better
job of it if it were your own house." The
young workman smiled, and is said to
have answered: "One never knows what
the future may bring forth." He had at
the time no political aspirations, but all
the same he now sits as senator in the
building he helped to adorn.
CERTIFICATE STATING THE
names, etc., of the members of the
partnership of McCarthy & Connell.
We, the undersigned, composing ail
the members of the partnership of Mc
Carthy & Connell, carrying on the busi
ness of wholesale and retail dealers in
beef, pork, mutton and veal, and poultry,
fish and game, in season, and having our
principal place of business at No. 107
North Main street, in the City of Butte.
Silver Bow county, state of Montana, do
hereby certify, that the names in;'ful! of
all of the members of the said partner
ship of McCarthy & Connell, and their
respective places of residence, are as
follows, to-wit:
Patrick McCarthy, Butte City, Silver
Bow County, Montana.
Henry D. Connell, Butte City, Silver
Bow County, Montana.
In witness whereof, we have hereunto
set our hands this 2Sth day of March,
A. D., 1S99.
Patrick McCarthy,
HENRY D. CONNELL.
State of Montana, County of Silver
i Bow—ss.
On this 2Sth day of March, in the year
1899, before me, the undersigned, Will K.
Quarles, a notary public In and for Sil
ver Bow county, state of Montana, per
sonally appeared Patrick McCarthy and
i Henry D. Connell, both personally
known to me to be respectively the per
sons described in and who executed the
foregoing certificate of partnership, and
whose names are subscribed as parties
thereto, and who severally acknowledged
to me that they executed the same.
In witness whereof, I have hereunto
set my hand and affixed my notarial
seal, the day and year in this, certificate
I first above written. *
LSeal]
WILL K. QUARLES,
Notary Public in and for Silver Bow
County, State of Montana.
;
THE UNION FAMILY THEATER
DICK P. SUTTON, Manager. Phono 13
SUNDAY, APRIL 9
The Clever and Laughable Burlesque,
entitled
"TA AND TA TA"
Headed by
MARIE ROSTELLE
And her clever company of 30 Burlesque
Artists, also introducing a strong Olio
of Eastern Specialty Artists, as follows:
Sommers and Neville, Rossley and Ros
telle, the La Rose Brothers, Milly La Foy,
Harry Hagai-, Charles Daly, Vifanti, Sis
son and Wallace and Miss Lulu Sutton.
Modern Mc g OR LEVS
Prices, 25c, 50c, iGe and
THE GRAND OPERA HOUSE
G. O. McFarland, Mgr. 'Phone 547.
Three Nights—Commencing on
Sunday, April 16,
Opening with Matinee Sunday
America's Foremost Comedian
BOBBY GAYLOR
With his merry associates in the Hilar
ious Farce,
TWINS
Saturday morning.
: t#*
Under Slate Supervision.
; Per Cent Interest Payable
Quarterly Paid on Deposits.
■. • Money to Loan on
.. • Real Estate...
Trustees—Lee Mantle, president: Chat.
Schatzlein, vice president; Fayette Har
rington, treasurer; Charles R. Leonard,
attorney; A. B. Clements, secretary;
F. Aug. Heinze. Henry Mueller. Frank
Haskins.
JOHN A CREIGHTON.,......President
_ w
W * STAPLETON......Vice President
». M. HODGENS..................Cashier
Stato Savings Bank
Paid In Capital ................... $100.00»
Surplus and Undivided Profits.... 60.00»
Corner Main and Park Streets, Butte.
Under State Supervision and Jurisdiction
Interest Paid on Deposits.
Sells exchange available in all the
principal cities of the United States and
Europe. Collections promptly attended
to. _____
TRANSACT A GENERAL BANKING
BUSINESS.
DIRECTORS—J- A. Creighton. Omaha;
O'. W. Stapleton. A. H. Barret. E. D.
Leavitt. S. V. Kemper. T. M. Hodgens
BANK
THE FIRST NATIONAL
OF BUTTE.
Andrew J. Davis................President
James A. Talbot..........Vice President
E. B. Weirlck......................Cashier
George Stevenson......Assistant Cashier
A General Mlm Business Trausaelei
FOREIGN EXCHANGE
We draw direct on all the principal
cities of Europe and issue our own let
ters of credit, available in all parts of the
world.
Special attention given to collections.
27 N. MAIN STREET
W. A. ClarJr.
J. Rosa Clark.
W. A. Clark & Bro
(Successors to Clark & Larable.)
BANKERS
Transacts a General Banking Business.
Buy Gold Dust. Gold Bars, Silver Bul
lion and Local Securities.
Boxes for rent in tlio only Safety De
posit Vault in the city.
Seil exchange available in all of ths
principal cities of the United States and
Europe.
Special attention given to collections.
ALEX J. JOHNSTON. Cashier.
Marcus l>aly. J. B- Hoggin. M, Doualioe.
Marcus Daly & Co.,
BANKERS
Butte - - - - Montana.
Transact a general banking business.
Sell exchange available on the principal
cities of the United States and Europe.
Collections promptly attended to.
JOSEPH V. LONG. Cashier.
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To Kansas
City
St. Louis,
And all points
East and South.
Free reclining
chair cars to
holders of regular tickets. For maps,
folders and information regarding tick
ets, berths, etc., call on or write
H. C. TOWNSEND.
G. P. * T. A., St. Louis, Mo.
H. B-. K.OSSER. IS. J.FLYNN,
C. F. Si P. A. T. P. A.
Salt Lake, Utah
DR. HUIE POCK
227 6. Main St.
Th» only pure root and herb treatment
in Butte.
Specialist in Chronic Disease of long
standing. Permanent cures made in all
Private Disease. The Diseases of Wo
men have been made a study of for
years, and are successfully treated.
J- D- McÜREGOl
VETERINARY SURGEON.
Honorary graduate of the Ontario Vet
erinary College, Toronto, Canada. Treats
all diseases of domesticated animals ac
cording ti scientific principles. Otfice at
Marlow's Stables, 104 S. Main street.
Telephone 293. All cases promptly at
tended to.
flSHUW
J.E.TUITE
Dealer la
Monuments, Tablet3
Copinfs, Etc.
In Ttallr.j and American
Marble, Scotch and
American Granite,
Wire and Iron HaM*
lags.
304 1 Montana Street
Railway Time Tables
me,
a
*
tî Cl£t
TIME CARD
--OF
TRAINS.
BUTTE
HAST BOUND
No. 14, AriaconOa to Bogan
connecting at Logan with
No. 4 for St Paul........
No. 114, Garrison to Butto,
connecting at Garrison
with No. 4 from Portland
No. 2, Twin City Mail the
through train to St. Paul
MIXED- to Whitehall ex
cept Sunday; Twin
Bridges Tuesday, Thurs -
day and Saturday; Pony
and Norris Monday and
Friday..............
WEST BOUND
No. 18, Logan to Anaconda
connecting at Logan with
No. M from St, Paul.....
No. 113, Butte to Garrison,
connecting with No. 8 for
Portland..................
No. 1, Puget Sound Mail
Arrive
Depart
13:50 p, m.
1.00 p. m.
1:33 p.m.
9:10 p. in
9:30 p. m
H:4A p. in
3:15 a. m.
10:30 a m.
10:40 a. m.
7:80 p. in
9:30 a. m.
7: SO p. m.
Standard Pullman, first-class and
Tourist Sleeping Cars to Portland, St.
Paul, Omaha and St. Louis without
change. Trains Nos. 1 and 2 run solid
via Butte.
W. H. MERRIMAN, A. G. A„
N. W. Cor. Park and Main Sts , Butte.
CHAS. S. FEE, G. P. A.,
St, Paul, Minn.
St. Paul, Minn.
Short Line
Southern and Beat Route
to the East and West.
Diniüî Cars, Pullman Palace aM Tourist
Sleepers Yia Salt Late and Deiner.
LEAVE BUTTE
For the East and Wes':.
FIRST DAY OUT
Arrive Ogden, Utah, con
necting with the Union
Pacific, Denver & Rio
Grande, and Southern
Pacific.
SECOND DAY OUT
Arrive Denver, Colo.,
Queen City of the West.
SECOND DAY OUT
Arrive Omaha, Neb.
THIRD DAY OUT
Arrive Chicago, only one
change of cars from
Butte (at Ogden).
SECOND DAY OUT
Arrive San Francisco,
Cal.
For tickets, sleeping car reservations
and further particulars, call on or ad
dress No. 19 East Broadway, Butte, Mont.
H. O. WILSON, General Agent.
D. E. BURLEY, G. P. & T. Agent,
Salt Lake, Utah.
4:45 pm
7:00 am
8:00 am
4:45 pm
7:45 am
8:45 pm
ATCHISON, TOPEKA & SANTA FE
(Santa Fe Route.)
East via Ogden to Kansas City, Chicago
'and St. Paul, making close connections in
union depots with trunk lines to all points
east and south. Also the direct line to
Galveston, Texas, City of Mexico and
points in New Mexico, Arizona and Cali
fornia.
For particulars call on R. G. W. R. R. >j»
o. S. £,. agents, Butto. or address
C. F. WARREN,
General Aeent. Salt Lake.
Best Dining Car Service.
ELEGANT EQUIPMENT.
Chair Gars Free.
TWO FAST TRAINS DAILY.
A BUTTE LODGE NO. 8». A. F. «
«fV A. M. Regular meeting in Ma
sonie Temple, second and fourth
Tuesdays of each month Sojourning
brethren cordially Invited to attend.
A SILVER BOW LODGE NO. 43,
wjr A. F. & A. M. Regular meeting 1»
Masonic Temple second and fourth
Thursdays of each month. Sojourning
brethren cordially Invited to attend,
Dan Yancey, Secretary.
Jordan & Whitney
Montana Livery
All kinds of Turnouts for Pleasure and
Business Purposes.
120 S. Montana Street
Tel. 7b Butte, Mont.
Batts, Anaconda & Pacific Railway
LOCAL TIME TABLE.
Trains Leave Butte for Anaconda as
Follows:
10:40 a. m., from Northern Pacific den
pot.
1:05 p. m., from B., A. & P. depot.
4:45 p. m., from B., A. & P. depot.
10:40 p. m., from B., A. & P. depot.
Trains leave Union Passenger station,
Anaconda, for Butte, as follows:
8:40 a. m., 11:50 a. m., 3:00 p. m. and
7:20 p. m.
Great Northern trains leave Anaconda:
8:40 a. in., Great Falls and Helena local,
via Butte.
7:20 p. m., Atlantic Express, for St.
Paul and all points east.
Northern Pacific trains leave Ana
conda:
9:35 a. m., Pacific Express for Portland
and all points west.
11:50 a. m., Atlantic Express for St.
Paul and all points east.
7:30 p. m., through train for all points
east and west.
Oregon Short Line trains leave Ana
conda:
3:00 p. m., for all points east; west and
south.
Tickets for sale for all points, local and
through, on the Great Northern railway,
Oregon Short Line railroad and Northern
Pacific railway and their connections.
Steamship tickets for sale to all points
in Europe, via the above lines.
threat Northern
MONTANA CENTRAL RAILWAY.
New fast time between St. Paul. Minne
apolis, Helena, Butts, Anaconda, Spo
kane, Seattle and Portland. Close con
nections for Kootenai country, Oregon
and California points, Alaska, ,fapan and
China. Connections at Twin Cities for all
points East and South.
LEAVE BUTTE.
Great Northern Flyer, daily... .8:30 p. m
Local for Great Falls, daily.. ..9:45 a. m
ARRIVE BUTTE.
Great Norther Flyer, daily....10:30 p. m
Local from Great Falla, daily., ..4:50 n. m
Through sleepers going East.
City Ticket Office, No. 41 North Main
street, Butte. J. E. DAWSON. Gen. Agt,
CAUSE —lie "didn't know."
EFFECT —He got there Too Lato
Next time he'll take the Burling
ton, which is TEN hours quicker
than any other line to Omaha, Kan
sas City, and St. Louis.
Other advantages are—
Through tourist sleepers, twice
a-wcek, Seattle, Spokane, and Hel
ena, to Kansas City—Through pal
ace sleepers, dally, Anaconda and
Butte to Omaha and St. Louis.
See nearest Northern Pacific ticket
agent, or write
PHIL DANIELS,
Passenger Agent, Butte, Mont.
BIG 4B01ITE
AND
Ciiesapte & OMo Ry
Limited Trains from
CHICAGO
PEORIA
ST LOUIS
TO ALL
Eastern and
Southern Cities
VIA
Cincinnati and Wash
ington» D. C.
W. P. Deppe. A. G. P. A., St. Louis. '
E. O. McCormick, P. T. M. Big Four.
H. W. Fuller, G. P A. C.
Washington, D. C.

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