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Daily inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1881-1901, April 18, 1899, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053057/1899-04-18/ed-1/seq-4/

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The Most
Gigantic
SIDE SALE
Ever Held in Butte
50,000 Worth
Of new and stylish foot wear including
ladies and childrens' spring shoes and ox
fords. Any thing made in the line of
shoes can ho found in this stock.
Ladies' strap sandals in all colors, any
size,
$ 1.00
Ladies' Oxford t ; es, black or tan hand
turned, all sizes,
$ 1.00
Infant's soft sole, bootees,
25c
Me-n's Vici dress shoe
$3.00
Remember this entire stock will be
turned into cash at once. This will be
your chance to stock up for a year.
Red Boot Shoe Co.
Butte, Mont,
Wholesale and Retail Dealers
LADIES
AVe wish to call your attention to our
silk line of High-Class Novelties.
A NEW DEPARTMENT
In. Rutte, where we make to order, at
moderate prices, many articles of Silk
wear. Silk Morning and Evening Gowns,
Silk Dressing Sacques, Silk Matinees,
Negligees, Silk Wrappers, Waists, Skirls,
Muslin and Silk Underwear and Hosiery.
Rooms 47-48, Owsley Block, Butte.
Mont.
WEINBERG BEOS. EPSTEIN
<s> This is a Cash Store that sells f
t goods lor spot cash, not one to six A
months' time—often never. No
À high-priced solicitors, bookkeepers
A or collectors. Neither is there a lot
A of bad bills to make up from those
Z who pay. All treated alike.
• Have a few of those Fancy White
» Cherries left, worth 25c per can. <$
4 °ui' price, 7 cans for $1.00. 4
f Pure Maple Sugar, worth 20c. 7
Our price, 8 pounds for $1.1)0. T
x Very Finest Minnesota Flours,
V worth elsewhere $3.00 and over, oui
^ price $2.30 per hundred. S!
T A Very Good Bread Flour $1.90 X
X per hundred (two sacks). A
" Notice a so-called Cash Store &
A selling Prunes for 10c per pound. A
\Ve sell 15 pounds for $1.00 of the 4
;am- goods. Other goods in pro- 4
action. X
Thanking you for a libertl pat- S
run age. 1 am
L. E. COOK,
331 East Park street.
WE BUY
p 11, Repair, Store, Pack and Ship, Rent
or Exchange Furniture with you
L utte Exch'g. Furniture Co.
J. CHAUVIN, Asrent.
42 W. Broadway,Butte
. l <$<$> $x5><$*$><*> Q ♦ <
IThere is |
No Truth... !
In the report
Ithat we are taking
>on no more custo
mers
I We have added 25 Î
J per cent, capacity tot
our plant, and canf
supply all who want
I gas.
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IBM Gas Ligii &i
Gale Co. I
48 East Broadway.!
I I
4,
A SEDUCTIVE
BEVERAGE
It Renders Americans Unfit
For Duty.
ITS SALE TO BE STOPPED
One of the WorstJThings That Has to
be Contended With in Manila
—Suggestions Made
New York, April 18.—A special to the
Tribune from Washington says: Among
the serious problems confronting General
Otis at Manila none has caused greater
anxiety than the alarming effects pro
duced upon American soldiers, particu
larly the enlisted men by a seductive
beverage which they produce in native
shops and which produced such physical
and mental demoralization as to give rise
to a suspicion that the army of occupa
tion was being systematically drugged or
poisoned to render them helpless to resist
an insurgent attack.
This native drink was generally known
as vino. It was exceedingly palatable
and inexpensive, but a single drink of it
unfitted a soldier for active duty for the
succeeding 24 hours, while frequent
potions sent the soldiers to the hospital
for a long period of illness. When the
source of the trouble was discovered Gen
eral Otis was disposed to prohibit the
traffic in vino altogether and to that end
referred the matter to General. Hughes,
provost marshal general of the city, with
a request for a suggestion looking to a
practical course of action. General
Hughes investigated the trouble and his
recommendations have been followed.
As long as Manila was crowded with
troops the vino industry, unrestricted,
was exceedingly lucrative, but now that
most of the Americans are in the field
practically all the shops where it had been
sold are closed. General Hughes' indorse
ment on the case was as follows:
j "I have avoided all discussion of this
! subject until I have sufficiently informed
I myself of the actual facts and while my
j information is not yet as full and com
I plete as I should like to have it. still I feel
j that I hazard nothing in whnt is stated
below. There arc quite a number of ar
ticles on sale at the wine shops in this
I city that are about the same thing. They
1 are a whitish liquor and usually flavored
\ and sometimes tinted by some innocent
; elements. They are called numerous
names—anisado, vino beno, Scotch whis
j key. etc. The basis of all them is simply
alcohol. Commercial alcohol is manu
factured here extensively front the refuse
: of sugar houses. It is pure and strong
and can be sold at a price that is far be
low that at which any other intoxicating
drink can be produced. The wine dealers
take this alcohol of commerce and dilute
it and add a cheap flavoring, and sell it
: under any name they see fit to bestow
upon it. Anyone familiar with the old
bottle trade can tell about it by giving
the various prices of labelled and not
labelled bottles. A Scotch whiskey bottle
with a perfect label is a very different
article of trade from one of the same kind
without a label.
"Now. are we expected to sweep alcohol
from the list of manufactures in order to
prevent a few ill controlled men from
getting drunk? These men want alcoViol
and in this form they can get it stronger
and cheaper than they get in in beer and
so they elect to take it. The natives take
it but in moderation and with discretion
and we have no trouble with them on ac
count of it whatever. The police are in
structed to endeavor to suppress tHo sale
of these strong alcoholic drinks to our
soldiers and persons found selling them to
American soldiers have their permits re
voked.
"There are occasionally shops that get
fruit alcohol and put in on sale as a bev
erage. This material is apt to produce
a very delirious or confused condition,
Wherever such shops are found, the po
lice are to withdraw the licenses from
the places. If commanders will he care
ful to report the places where the men
have obtained the drink which produces
the effects mentioned it shall be the effort
of this ofliee to take such measures as
will prevent a recurrence. It has occurred
to me that local commanders might do
much themselves to control their men. A
plan which commends itself to me would
be somewhat us follows: Observe the
shops in their vicinity where their men
get alcohol and where they loaf. Declare
in orders that such shops, designating
them distinctly, are outside the bounds
of liberty and by arresting and punishing
these uncontrolled men for non-conform
ity, much evil might be averted. This is
a matter for tile consideration of com
manders and is only given as a sugges
tion that might lead to a better condition
of things."
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WAS ATTEMPT TO
"FOOL THE COURT"
Springfield, III., April 18.—For tho first
time in its history tho Illinois supreme
court has adjudicated a ease in which an
attempt had been made to ''fool the
court," by means of a collusive law suit.
The parties who were pronounced guilty
of the act of imposition—anti-butterine
agitators of Chicago and Elgin—not only
had their cases thrown out of court on
motion, but they and their attorneys were
informed that they stood in grave danger
of imprisonment or fines for contempt.
Something of a sensation was created in
legal circles by the announcement of the
unprecedented decision.
GOOD COFFEE
You lind very few people who are not fond
of Good Coffee, Of course you find infer
ior grades of Coffee— just as there are inferior grades of anything else,
lint you will never find it in At
—wo don't pack that kind.
Grocers.'
The case closes an exciting chapter in
extended litigation over the question of
the constitutionality of the anti-butterlne
law of 1897. The important ruling was the
dismissal of an' appeal in the case of Ed
win L. McAdam against the people of the
state of Illinois. It was charged by ex
Judge Richard Prendergast, representing
several butterine dealers, that MeAdam's
appeal was a collusive and fraudulent at
tempt to obtain a decision from the
court apparently hostile to McAdam, but
in reality greatly to bis benefit. The court
resolved the question of punishment for
contempt which had been asked against
McAdam and his attorneys and Mr. Pot
ter of Elgin, who purchased a package of
butterine from McAdam. The decision
leaves the question of the alleged uncon
stitutional ity of the antl-butterine laws
still unsettled.
CHINESE WERE
DRIVEN BACK
New York, April 18.—A dispatch to the
Herald from Hong Kong says: Thous
ands of Chinese advanced toward the
British camp at Taipohu Monday and fir
ed several rounds of artillery at Ineffec
tive range. Maj. Gen. Gascoigne, whose
force is less than 300, ordered his artillery
to engage the enemy, who occupied the
surrounding Hills. Shrapnel drove the
Chinese nut ar/d the Indian infantry ad
vanced, the Chinese retiring several
miles, burning villages. The Chinese
losses are unknown, as they carried away
their dead and wounded. The British
had ro loss. It is proposed to advance
the British occupation. With the occu
pation of his staff Gen. Gascoigne is util
izing only Indian troops. Hong Kong is
guarded by volunteers and Welsh fusil
eers.
Will Veto the ltill
Denver, Colo., April IS.—Gov. Thomas
has announced that lie will veto the bill
passed by the general assembly at its
recent session providing for an indeter
minate sentence with a parole privilege
for prisoners. He stated that he does not
like the parole feature. The bill was
passed through the vigorous efforts of
tiie state board of charities and correc
tions.
Desperate Crook Arrested
Denver, Colo., April IS.—Ed. Haw
thorne, said to be one of the most desper
ate crooks in the country and charged
with about 40 burglaries i n various parts
of the country, mostly in San Francisco,
is under arrest here.
MISCELLANEOUS.
For many centuries it has been the
common belief that salt and much of it
is necessary to the human system. Few
people are aware that on a g average the
food we eat contains sufficient of the
mineral for ail ordinary purposes. Many
physicians, on the contrary, are now
tending to the belief that salt is moder
ately, if not Highly, deleterious to the
system. It is true that certain animals
require it in large quantities, hut that
does not hold for the human pace. Sail
ors, who are confined almost entirely to
the uso of salty food, suffer ills unspeak
able on long voyages. The use of salt is
purely a habit, and, although those who
have hern addicted to the use of it for
: years would undoubtedly suffer if they
were to break off suddenly, there is no
reason why they cannot reform grnd
ually. Condiments in anv form are be
ginning to lie generally decried by the
hygienists.
The newest veil is of white or black
Chantilly, slightly longer in the center
than at the sides, and shaped to lit the
hat. It has been worn in Paris all win
ter. Women who find that the large lig
ures are unbecoming, wind the veil
loosely about the hat, ns though care
lessly thrown back from the face. The
veil is extremely becoming to a brilliant
complexion and large features, but faces
that are finely chiseled and delicately
tinted will find that a better effect is
produced when the veil is wound around
the hat than when worn over the face.
Tf the queen holds the drawing room in
person the woman presented removes her
right-hand glove, places her hand be
neath that of the queen and kisses her
majesty's hand. When one of the prin
cesses holds the drawing-room, ladies
on 1 y courtesy and omit the hand-kiss>ng.
The courtesy is not slow and measured,
but should he quick and graceful. Full
instructions as to one's dress are always
given at the Lord Chamberlain's office.
Probably M. Vivier, the Parisian dog
tailor, is not sorry that there is a fad for
equipping pet dogs with overshoes. M.
Vivier has a monopoly of tho fashionable
canine trade in Paris and says that it is
harder to fit a blanket to a dog than a
gown to a woman.
HELD.
Beneath a -shady tree they sat,
He held her hand, she held his hat:
I held my breath, and lay quite fiat.
They kissed; T saw them do it.
Tie held that kissing was no crime;
She 'held her face up every time;
I held my peace and wrote this rhyme
While they thought no one knew it.
A TELLING SPEECH.
"Colonel Brown," remarked chappie,
"is the finest after-dinner speaker I know
of."
"Why?" said his friend with some as
tonishment. "T never heard hp had any
ability in that direettion at all."
"Well, he has. I've dined with him sev
eral times at various places, and after:
dinner he always says; 'That's ail right, j
my boy, I'll pay for It.' "
JAPANESE CHERCHES.
Of tho 6.000 Japanese on (he Pacific
coast 800 are Christians, and there are a
number of regularly organized churches
among them that are entireley self-sup
porting.
GROWTH OF GIRLS.
The growth of girls Is greatest in th.dr
fifteen year; of boys in their seventeenth.
THE CASE OF
MOIINEAUX
The Prosecuting Attorney Gives
His Side
OF THE HECKMAN MATTER
He is Satisfied That the Latter Was
Unlawfully Accused of Be
ing an Ex-Convict.
j
Nashville, Tenn., April 18.—Governor
McMillin is in receipt of a letter from
Bartow S. Weeks of New York, attorney
for Molineaux, against whom Nicholas
Heckman is the principal witness. Mr.
Weeks states to the governor that im
plicit confidence w r as put in the state
ments of Arthur Colyar, the Nashville
attorney. Mr. Weeks enters into a full
history of Colyar's connection with the
ease, beginning with the letter from
Nashville, alleging that Heckman was
an escaped convict from the Tennessee
prison. He tells of the arrangements
made between himself and Colyar for the
latter's visit to New York, declaring he
paid no fee and that his sole purpose
has been to ascertain Heckman's record
in order, if possible, in a legal manner,
to discredit him as a witness against
Molineaux. For this lie advanced the
necessary expenses, but says:
"I am now satisfied that a great in
justice has been done to Mr. Heckman
through this mistake or false identifica
tion, which I deeply regret."
Mr. Weeks has this further to say;
"We relied on the statements of Mr.
Colyar in view of the fact that he was an
attorney in good standing as far as we
knew, and we had no reason to doubt
His assertions. Furthermore, we knew
that his father was one of the leading
members of the bar of your state, and
on that account I do not hesitate to
accept the statements of A. S. Colyar,
Jr. We write this letter in order that
you may have the facts before you and
may be convinced that we» deal with the
utmost good faith throughout the whole
affair, and if there has been any fraud
in the matter it lias been entirely without
our knowledge."
YUKON RIVER IS
BREAKING UP
Victoria, B. C., April 18.—Men just ar
rived from the Klondike say that the
Yukon is already breaking up and is
flooded from Marsh lake up. One party
of four, headed by Stuart of Snohomish,
Wash., went through the ice near White
Horse on April 2 and were drowned with
their dogs. While the Litkie party, now
here, was crossing Summit lake last Sat
urday, John Alexander went through the
ice and was rescued with difficulty.
Grave anxiety is expressed for those now
on the trail. A tangle in titles is re
ported from Atlin, where many Ameri
cans located claims last year, only to he
ousted by the passage of the'anti-alien
act of this spring. During the winter
claim jumping by-the wholesale has been
progressing, and there are now three or
four disputants for every claim on Spruce
and Pine creeks. Some of the Americans
are taking British partners to hold their
property.
Subsidies Are Granted
San Francisco, April 18.—Prince Ko
noye of Japan is authority for the state
ment that the parliament of his country
lias decided to grant the subsidies to the
two steamship companies now operating
lines between the Orient and this coun
try. This will mean that each of the
companies will at once build for the
trade between Yokohama and San Fran
cisco and for that between Yokohama
and Seattle three ships which will lie as
large as those now in tHo service.
NO SAVING.
Chicago News: "My wife never buys
a hat or even a pair of gloves without
first consulting me."
"Is that so? Well, old man, your wife's
a wonder. You ought to be able to save
money."
"1 could, probably, if she didn't always
go and get what she wanted just the same
as if I had agreed to it."
CASTOR IA
For Infants and Children.
Ihe Kind You Have Always Bought
Hears the
attire
I the tar and %
£ THE TARTAR,.. %
( &
If! Any kind of trouble is $
fp unpleasant. A great deal .$
Ç of the trouble of house- 2
keeping conies from an un- J
£ satisfactory grocery store, ÿ
$ We have many pleased
Ç customers. Would like to 5
Jjjj number you among them. ^
f Will you let us try? Very &
l respectfully, e
î 1\ ,1. BliOPIIY & CO. S
I Grocers and Importers *
I Butte, Montana.
WANT AD VS
2 Gents Per Word for First Issue
1 Cent Per Word After First Issue
$1.00 Per Line Fer Mouth.
PERSONAL
A FIRST-CLASS COOK WOULD LIKE
to make the acquaintance of a iady be
tween tlie ages of 26 and 30, one who
has had dining-room experience; ob
jest, matrimony. Address S. O., this
office.
JARVIS WHTTF. FORMERLY
of Chico, Cal., wanted to write his
Daughter Alma at 94 Goff street, Au
burn, Me.
PERSONS ELIGIBLE TO
matrimony and willing to become mem
to send their names and addresses
1286 Bim ntana Matrlmonlal Club ' Box
employment.
ROYAL FRATERNAL UNION, ST.
Louis, Mo., perfection of accident, sick
ness and death insurance; $125 monthly
salary and commission to hustlers.
AGENTS, GENERAL AND CANVASS
ing, patent Perforated Frying Pan
Covers; no greasy stoves; best frying.
Kitchen Specialty Co., Reading, pa.
FIRST-CLASS DRESSMAKER WANTS
sewing with private families. Enquire
Room 2, Ellwood block.
WANTED—PERMANENT OR TEM- j
porary position by first-class book- j
keeper and general office man. Best of ;
references. Z. Y. Inter Mountain.
AGENTS — EITHER SEX PATENT
perforated frying pan covers. No !
greasy stoves. Best frying. 150 Com.
KITCHEN SPECIALTY CO., Reading,
Pa.
Bookkeeper—work wanted on
books, by experienced accountant, a
few hours daily. Call at Inter Moun
tain office.
MONTANA EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
wiii furnish help of ail kinds. Room 5
10 W. Broadway, Butte.
BUSINESS CHANCES.
FOR SALE—TWO OUTSIDE SHOW
cases. 402 North Main.
FOR SALE—RESTAURANT IN GOOD
location, doing nice business. Neatest
place in city for $425. Room 2, 26 East
Broadway.
A. J. HORDS. AGENT GRAND UNION
Tea company, and agent for the Bril
liant Gas Lamps, best on the market,
only $8. Address 719 South Arizona.
FOR SALE—TWO LOTS, 19 and 20,
Hopkins & Noyes Addition, situated on
corner Second and Arizona streets,
three bricks, sell reasonable, half down,
balance on time. 942 South Arizona
street.
FINEST RESIDENCE ON THE WEST
side for $ 4.000, worth $6.500, Party leav
ing city of Butte for their health. W. H.
Winters.
FOR SALE—A SNAP, FURNITURE OF
9-room house, everything good as new,
fine location, will sell for $350. Call at
701 South Main street, u pstairs.
GROCERY AND CONFECTIONERY
store for sale. Inquire at store, 213
South Montana slreet.
FOR SALE—TWO HOUSES AND TWO
lots, one brick and one frame, for $3,700,
on reasonable terms. Enquire at house
627 South Wyoming street.
STANDARD BAKERY, 605 SOUTH
Utah avenue. Everything new and
first-class. Your trade solicited. Rud
man & Turk, proprietors.
For. SALE—DESIRABLE LOT WEST
side $575. Easy payments. Butte Land
& Investment Co., S. V. Kemper, Presi
dent, 19 W. Granite.
FOR SALE—GOOD HOUSE EAST SIDE
$25 per month. Butte Land & Invest
ment Co., S. V. Kemper, President,. 19
W. Granite.
FOR SALE—THE PLANT OF CAS
cade Steam Laundry (incorporated),
Great Falls, Mont. Oldest established
business in Great Falls. For informa
tion write George I. Smith, Choteau,
Montana.
FURNISHED ROOMS.
ONE NEATLY FURNISHED FRONT
room, in private family. Inquire at 15
North Idaho.
FOR RENT—NICE HOUSEKEEPING
rooms furnished or unfurnished. Best
location in the city. Inquire at 118
East Granite street.
ONE NICE FRONT ROOM WELL FUR
nished; good location; with private
family. Rent reasonable. 17 South
Grant street.
FURNISHED ROOMS AT 705 SOUTH
Arizona street, the new Lindsay house.
All modern conveniences: newly built
and furnished; large, light, well ven
tilated rooms. Reasonable to all. 705
South Arizona street.
ONE NICELY FURNISHED ROOM
and also three rooms for housekeeping;
good location; renetreasonable. Call
663 South Utah avenue, upstairs.
SHERMAN HOUSE, 107 W. QUARTZ,
furnished rooms, with bath, electric
light, etc., at reasonable rates.
TWO FURNISHED ROOMS SINGLE
or en suite. Bath and electric light. 310
W. Broad way.
FOR RENT—NEWLY FURNISHED
rooms, In new brick building, corner of
Arizona and Mercury streets; tran
sients solicited.
X. !.. N. T.—COMFORTABLE SITTING
room. Prompt calls Steam heat and
electric lights. 27 South Main. Bed*
25c and 50c.
MUSIC.
E. J. PASMORE—PROFESSOR OF
Binging, organ and piano. Studio 203
E. Granite street.
ROOM AND BOARD
FIRST-CLASS TABLE BOARD, HOME
cooking, rates reasonable; also a fine
suite of rooms to rent, furnished, at 518
West Granite street.
THE PARKER HOUSE IS THE ONLY
first-class board and rooming house
on East Park street. Our rates are $28
per month. We treat all alike. Right
on the ear line. 627 East Park street,
Mrs. Ida J. Parker, prop.
BOARD AND ROOMS; GOOD LOCA
tion. Home cooking. No. 407 East
Broadway street.
FURNISHED"HOUSES
FOR RENT—HOUSE, FOlt $10 PER
month, water, etc. included. 103G East
Park.
THREE-ROOM COMFORTABLE MOD
ern house, furnished. 229 East Plati
num.
FOR RENT
NEWLY PAPERED MODERN HOUSE,
four large rooms. 229 East Platinum,
east of Arizona.
FOR RENT—10-ROOM HOUSE, COR
tier of Utah avenue and Third street,
all modern conveniences. Inquire on
premises
ALL KINDS OF NEW AND SECOND
har.d goods bought and sold. We buy
anything. 342 East Park street.
MONEY TO LOAN
MONEY TO LOAN ON REAL ESTATE.
See Butte Land & Investment Co.. S.
V. Kemper, president, 19 W. Granite.
MONEY TO LOAN—MONEY TO LOAN
in large or small quantities on real es
tate security. I also have money to
loan on household furniture. Chas. L.
Smith, 23 West Granite street.
MONEY TO LOAN—$100,000 TO LOAN
on real estate security. I can furnish
any amount desired, at the very lowest,
rate of interest. W. H Winters, Ows
ley block.
MILLINERY.
MILLINERY AND HAIR DRESSING
parlors; latest styles and fashions. 114
West Broadway.
NURSE.
MRS. S. A. DAVIS TRAINED NURSE
ali calls promptly attended to. House
328V£ S. Montana street.
MEDIUMS.
MISS SUNDBERG, 56 E. BROADWAY.
Room 20; gives readings daily. Circles
Wednesday evenings. Developing cir
cles Friday evening.
MME. GUY, 203 S. DAKOTA STREET.
Circles every Tuesday and Friday even
ings.
MISCELLANEOUS.
ATTENTION! — TO LADIES; MRS.
Burns, at 490 East Park street, gives
lessons in fancy embroidery; stamping
done. For sale, pads and patterns of
all kinds; also takes orders and teaches
lessons on all flowers artificial, at
reasonable prices; in connection, hair
dressing and manicuring parlors, spe
cialty scalp treatments, face treatment,
known as facial massage. For two
weeks I will manicure at 50c, shampoo
ing at 50c and 75c; gray hair restored to
natural color. 490 East Park street.
EGGS FOR HATCHING, FROM
thoroughbred Buff Leghorns;
splendid layers, none better.
Appiy at No. 1020 Nevada
street.
ASSAYERS.
BRADEN & BAPTY, ASSAYERS AND
Chemists, 119 Hamilton street (Carney
6 Hands' old stand); work carefuly and
promptly attended to. Office open from
7 a. m. to 9:30 p. m.
A. B. ROMRATIER, ASSAYER AND
chemist, 103 E. Broadway, opposite tbs
McDermott Hotel.
NOTICE TT» 2C-OWNER.
To Benjamin Armstrong, your heirs or
iissigns: You are hereby notified that we
have expended during the year 1898 one
hundred dollars ($100.00) In labor and im
provements upon each of the following
quartz lode mining claims, situated in the
Divide Creek Mining district, Silver Bow
county, Montana, a more particular de
scription of which Is found In the location
notices of the said iode claims as recorded.
Tho Oliver King, recovded in Book F page
206; the Sage Uen, recorded ln Book F, page
207; the "'acoma, recorded ln Book J, page
?0; the Goodwin, recorded in Book J, page
411; the Golden Bell, recorded in Book I,
page 89, In the office of the county recorder
of Silver Bow county. Montana; that the
said labor was performed and the said im
provements were mafia for the purpose of
holding said claims under the provisions
of Section 2324, Revised Statutes of the
United States, and the amendments thereto
concerning annual labor on mining claims
fer the year 1868, when said labor and Im
provements were made. If within ninety
day» after the last publication of this no •
tico you fall or refuso to contribute your
proportion, amounting to one hundred and
twelve dollars and fifty cents ($112.50), of
said expenditures, as a co-owner, your in
terest In the said cliims will become the
property of the undersigned, your co
owners, who have made the Hoove de
scribed expenditure! according to the re
quirements of tho add section.
PAT KIRLEY,
JAMES KIRLEY.
FRANK KIRLEY.
Dated this 6th fay of January. 1899.
Good Jersey
Milch Cows
-_^For Sale
Stock Taken to Winter
Driving Horses for Safe.
Inquire
BireMalt Stock Farm
29 W. Broadway.
Will lei contract for irrigating and j>u*»
ting-up entire crop of h»y.

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