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Daily inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1881-1901, May 09, 1899, Image 4

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053057/1899-05-09/ed-1/seq-4/

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What Is Oar Loss
Is Toor tain
Owing to the backwardness of the sea
*on, the Red Hoot Shoe Co. has placed on
«ale their largo and elegant stock of
spring and summer goods. Over $60,001)
worth of
Shoes, Slippers
and Oxfords
In all the lates shapes and colors at less
than eastern prices.
Remember these are all this season's
goods.
Any broken lots of last season at half
cost.
It will be to your interest to bear these
prices in mind:
Men's Dress Shoes, round or square toe..
$1.00
Men's Dress Shoes in Tan Cadet toe....
SI-5'3
Men's Vici Oxfords for street ............j
SI. 50
Ladies' chocolate vesting top shoe, coin
toe, sizes 2'.'. to 7 ........................
SI .65
Ladies' chocolate vici lace, size 2 1 j to S..
SI. 50
Ladies' white or black strap sandals....
St.< o
Ladies' tan and black Oxfords,
turned, size 2 v i to S ....................
SI.on
Misses' Shoes, tan or black, size Ilia to 2
95 c
Children's Shoes from 25c up.
The Sal» is Now Going on.
Red Boot Shoe Co.
35 North Main
LADIES
We wish to call your attention to cur
eilk line of High-Class Novelties.
A NEW DEPARTMENT
In Butte, where we make to order, at
moderate prices, many article.-? of Silk
wear. Silk Morning and Evening Gowns,
Silk Dressing Sacques. Silk Matinees.
Negligees, Silk Wrappers, Waists, Skirts,
Muslin and Silk Underwear and Hosiery.
Rooms 47-4S, Owsley Block, Butte,
Mont.__
WEINBERG BROS. A EPSTEIN
hand
Groceries
17 pounds Sugar...................
15 pound? fancy French Prunes....
1 can Syrup........................
2 cans California Jelly....... .....
20 pound pail Jelly .................
E pound glass Strawberrv Preserve?
26 Boxes Matches ......'...........
1 dozen Fresh Eegs .......... '____ [
2 sacks Table Salt (extra) .........
10 cans California Blackberries.....
1 25c jar French Mustard ..........'
Very finest Minnesota Flour sack.!
Dates, pound .....................
15 pounds Raisins.............. ' ,
$ cans finest imported sardines
Finestcocoanut, pound package
Pickles 73c galion. 20o quart.
..SI.OO
. 1.00
15
1.00
15
1.15
10
1.00
1.00
COOK'S
33i E. Park St., Butte
WE BUY
Sell, Repair. Store. Pack and Ship, p.m*
or Exchange Furniture with you
Butte Excli'g. Furniture Co.
J. CHAUVIN. Agent,
42 W. Broadway,Butte
.y''
r
4-j
vmi
*>v\
■—'A
Gras Stoves I
NO
For Sale
Dirt. Smoke
Will.
or Rent. 4>
or Ash es to rot lie
$
BUTTE CAS LICHT mi
COKE CD.
Broadway.
: : : t i <b
^
^ £
mfiim
XL+n
S/e. 4 jT. S
ft
i
j
OUR BEEF
IN GERMANY
Not Believed That it Will be
Excluded
OPINION OF AN EXPERT
That Country Cannot Afford to Start
A Commercial War With
the United States,
New York, May 9.—President Charles
Wardell Stiles, scientific attache to tHe
American embassy in Berlin, will return
to Ills post of duty on the Paris, sailing
on Wednesday. When asked what he
thought of the dispatches from Berlin to
the effect that American meats are in
danger of being excluded from Germany,
Mr. Stiles said:
"The situation is not as serious as one
might assume from the cablegrams. A
! careful and technical study of it shows
I several probable mistakes. Undoubted
ly the 'embalmed beef' stories have been
used by the reiohstag committee to which
! the meat bill was referred. Undoubtedly
[this committee will report some amend
j ments to the government bill. But as for
providing such impossible inspection as
to destroy the trade of this country,
there is no fear of that. The German
government is far too fair, just and cau
tious to directly invite a commercial war
with us. The reference to the exclusion
of chipped meats is probably correct, al
though such exclusion would more nat
urally be made by regulation than by the
law itself. We also need not be sur
prised to learn that soft sausages are
excluded. The reichstag may try to ex
clude hard sausages, but if the German
government excludes tlie importations of
hard sausages on alleged sanitary
grounds, other countries will undoubt
edly exclude German sausages. The al
leged proposition to exclude hams is new.
and even if the
committee has brought
this forward I don't think it will be ac
cepted. The reference to fresh meats is
probably correct, but this part of the j
question does not apply to us at present,
as our trade now includes no fresh meat I
shipments to Germane. resn mea, ,
Germany.
"The great difficulty Americans have
to contend with in Germany is the local
regulations. The police of Stuttgart, for
instance, have told me that only the un
opened original package can enter that
city, while the customs officials on the
frontier naturally insist upon opening
the boxes. This and many other local
régulations will be done away with if
the government bill is accepted. Not
withstanding the discouraging nature of
the advices there is no cause for imme
diate anxiety. Every effort will be made
by American and German representa
tives of our meat r.terests to secure a
fail- solution of the meat question. I feel
perfectly confident that the German gov
ernment will not accept a bill which dis
crimina tes against American meats. Our
meats will be subjected to the sa, me regu
lations as all other imported
Moreover. Germany cannot get
without our pork."
I
j
meats.
along
WESTERN LABOR
UNION MEETING
Sait Lai.e, Utah, May 8.—The sixth an
nual convention of the Western Federa
tion of Miners met in Odd Fellows' hall
this morning. No business was transaet
ed and an a
2 o clock. 1 he session this afternoon was
executive and no representatives of the
piess were admitted. The- first annual
meeting of the Western Labor Union was
buhl today. The organizations are allied
but hold separate sessions. The officers
are to be elected, reports heard and many
matters discussed in the secret session.
In tiie open sessions which will come
later there will be considered the estab
lishment of a home for sick and disabled
members; adding an insurance feature
to cover injury and death: the publica
tion of an official journal and a system
atic method of increasing the member
bhip and power of the organization.
Delegates from the surrounding states
are in attendance. The meetings will
continue for several days.
At the afternoon session of the first
named organization Secretary James
Maher of Butte, Mont., reported an in
crease in membership for the last yn 0 r
of from 10.000 to 16,000. The secretary's f
report showed a balance in the treasury !
of $15,000. The fund being raised for a I
miners' home has, during the past year, :
increased from $3,500 to $13,000. .Salt
Lake, Denver and Pueblo are the eon
oit cities f-if tire next annual con
vention of the Western Miners' associa
The convention will probably con
week, the election of office) s
of the last orders on the pro
tion
tinuc for
being uni
gramme.
At the afternoon session of the West
ern Labor union M. J. Geiger of Butte
was elected secretary pro torn in the
absence of the regular secretary. After
the nppointmnet of committees Presi
dent McDonald delivered his annual ad
dress. The president did not favor the
taking in of contraetors, superintend
ents or foremen. He favored the pub
lication of a journal in the interests of
the organization, and spoke strongly in
favor of the effort to unite the labor or
ganizations of the country and appoint
ed a committee to make investigation
of this subject and report at the n xt
annual meeting of the union. He de
nounced the present system of electing
Judges, basing hi* attack on what he
terms "base u of writ of injunction,"
j
I
HEkl'3 THE WINNER, SMOKE
Quo Vadis" Cigars
TWO FOR 25 CENTS.
and suggested an amendment to the
constitution making federal judges
electable by the people. Nearly the en
tire west was represented at the conven
tion, delegates being present from Cali
fornia, Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Mon
tana and Colorado.
Relief Wm Received.
San Francisco, May 9.—-Mrs. Katherine
A. Tingley, head of the Universal
Brotherhood league, who Is in this city,
received a cable message from Emilo Ba
cardi, mayor of Santiago, stating that a
ton of rice and sixty-five packages she
had ordered sent to Cuba for the relief
of the distress there had been duly re
ceived. She lias also secured affidavits
from high officials of the brotherhood,
praising the manner in which she attend
ed to relief work in Cuba. She is now
in a position to refute the alleged asser
tions of a rival wing of the-osbphists that
the provisions sent to Santiago have
never reached their destination.
A NEW COMEDY
WAS A SUCCESS
San Francisco, May 9.—A new farcical
comedy entitled "His Japanese Wife," by !
Clay M. Green, was given its first pro
duction on any stage at the Alcazar the
ater last night. It was well received by
a discriminating audience, including a
large delegation from the Bohemian club,
of which Mr. Green is a member. At the
close of the second act the author was
called before the curtain and briefly re
turned thanks for the warm welcome
given to his play.
The plot deals with the subject of con
tract marriages in Japan, which lias been
treated in a more serious vein by Edwin
Arnold and others. Harry Merrifleld. a
young author, who has written a treatise
on Japan, is the hero, who becomes in
volved in many complications because
his jealous wife believes lie has contract
ed a marriage with Miss Go, a Japanese
girl. Tiie girl's father, a Japanese
wrestler, proved to be a unique figure on
the stage, and divided the honors with a
mother-in-law of angelic disposition, who
is adored by lier son-in-law, Merrifietd.
The comedy is in three acts and contains
many amusing situations. It was well
played by the Alcazar stock company, i
„ , _ .
G^ " n,, Court of Fo ^nter,.
Tacoma. Wash., May 9.—The grand
j court of Foresters of America meets here
today and all the delegates have arrived
. , , ... ,
, foaay and tomorrow will be spent in
business session. Among the important
matters to be considered are the election
of officers, decision on a change of bi
enaiia.1 instead of annual grand courts, j
and the selection of two representatives
to the national court. 'E. Fitzgerald of
Spokane and H. G. Stoelting, J. A. West
borg and Dr. L. C. Neville, all of Seattle,
are candidates for delegates. A. Mueller j
of Spokane, now grand-sub-chief ranger, !
is said to be Slated for grand chief :
ranger. ;
Filipinos Cnnnot l,nn(i.
San Francisco. May 9.—United States
Immigration Officer North has refused to
permit the landing of ten native Filipinos
who arrived here a few days ago on the
steamer City of Pekin. The natives are
under contract to exhibit in a New York
museum. Commissioner North takes the
position, therefore, that because of their
agreement to place themselves on exhibi
tion they are contract laborers and as
such are not entitled to land in. this coun
try. On the other hand the Filipinos
claim that they are ac-tors and not la
borers. They will probably appeal the
ease to Washington.
!
Washington Medicos,
Tacoma, Wash., May 9.—' Tira- State
Medical society will begin a two days'
session here today. It is expected that
the foremost physicians in the state will
be here. Tiie visitors will be entertained
by the Pierce County society. A
tion and banquet will be given.
recep
Westorn Turf Asiociutlov.
San Francisco, May 9.—Articles of in
corporation of the Western Turf associa
tion have been placed on record. The cap
ital stoc-k is $250,000 divided into 5 000
chares of $500 each.
Ladies' fiine shoes, Oxfords and slip
pers, $1, 73c. and 50c. Tassell's, 25 West
Park. «
SHORT I.INK PAUK
This beautiful resort can be secured for
picnics or excursions on very liberal
terms. Perfect train service and first
class management guaranteed. For fur
ther particulars address or call on
OHAS. LIEBENSTEIN,
Room 528 Hennessy Building.
Finest ;rown bridge work. i>r. Wix.
PLEASANT RIDE.

Stages
for
Crystal
Springs
and I.
i* nn
dale wi'I
lf»3
v- Hub
Stables.
West <
' • a r.
a
ite street
Is z: ? lpa
vo stable
s. for 1.
»vr.n
dale 10 n
l. !"■»,
. mi £
. r\ Si
lap-'-s
'pave
Lyncda!
• • :Tin*
i : r.acn i
jy.d 7 ■
a. in.
Stages !
f table s
for Crys
! La! »
•in p's
10 a. m.
. 2 '
rr., an
d 8:15 p
. m. J
i av n
Crystal
£pri
rigs returning id
non,
", r>
m., and
10-3
10 p. r.n.
Fare 23
cents
a. !i
!
-
[
I
;
;
! I
!
i a
!
I
j
j
j
When others fail, go to Dr. Rinehai
All women know Seguro cures all
female troubles. $500.00 reward for any
case of leucorrhoea we can't cure. Price
$1.50 per box. Keguro Manufacturing
Co., 12 and 14 Weyerhorst block, corner
Galena and Idaho street. Fostofflce box
984, Butte, Mont.
Gold crowns. Dentist Rinehart.
Como to Tassell's $1 shoe sale and see
what you can get for $1. Tassell, 25 West
Park. *
Gold fUlir.gn, Lowest rates. Dr. Wix.
a
INSTANCES OF
_BRAVERY
Shown By the Soldiers In the
Philippines
TOO NUMEROUS TO MENTION
Case of Captain Clay Who Was Also a
Hero of Santiago—Another
Erave Officer Killed.
Manila, April 2, via San Francisco, May
9.—Instances of personal bravery have
been quite as numerous in the American
army in the Philippines as during the
! ^ ubal1 campaign, but the correspondents
i
have had not had the same opportunity to
chronicle these deeds of daring in the
Orient, because, owing to the thickness
of the country penetrated many heroic
acts were unseen and unheard of for days
after their occurrence.
A soldier who has well illustrated the
quality of the American army is Captain
Charles Clay of the Seventeenth infantry.
Capt. Clay is a native of Lexington, Ky.
and a grandson of Henry Clay. He
brought new honor to the family name in
Cuba, where during the hottest action of
the Santiago field, when his men were
lying behind cover for a shelter from a
shower of bullets, he marched back and
forth in front of his company as erect and
cool as though on dress parade, nor
would he yield to the appeals of the men
t hat he find shelter. 'The captain never
fergot for a second that he was a 'Clay,''
one of them explained. When Gen. Hale
was assigned to a brigade in the Philip
pir.es he appointed Clay to the position of
adjutant. On the first day of MacArthur's
advance, Capt. Clay, riding erect as usual,
received a bullet through the- neck. He
lay six hours in the jungle before he was!
discovered and as the wound was a dan
gerous one at best his life was despaired
of. His only thought when he was
brought into the hospital was that his
family should be informed that he was
bur slightly injured. He is now, however,
well on the road to complete recovery.
Among those officers who have fallen
no one will be more loyally' remembered
j by his comrades than Lieut. Gregg of the
Fourth infantry. No man in the army
had niore than he to make life worth liv
in S, fo1 ' friends, success in his profession,
a vitality and physical strength that
j made him the impesonation of athlete and
! soldier. His fearlessness and confidence
: in his powers contributed to his death,
; In the beginning of the hot fight at Mar
lqmna, which Gen. Otis commanded with
! such skill that it was worth more notice
than it has ever received. Gregg was near
his chief. The young officer's horse had
just been shot under him. He was tak
ing off the saddle when a sharpshooter
was pointed out in a tree near by. Refus
ing to take cover as most of the men were
doing, Lieu-t. Gj-egg stepped forward and
unclasped his field glass. Just as he rats- j
ed them to his eyes a puff of smoke was
seen. >n the tree. Gregg put his hand to
hisbreast and fell forward killed instnatiy.
WHY CARNEGIE
SOLD HIS PLANT
I
Justify
the
definition.
served.
of a philAnthropb
a grec
t deal
cf mon ay
sense."

-----*
Ur. I
I. J. L
lOchinger hr
the ea)
=t r.nd
will resun::
h!s rfld
cifice,
37 X. :: in f
——1-----
Gold
fübr. g
I. :v r:
New York, May 9.—A dispatch to the
! Tribune from London says: Andrew
Carnegie, asked to give his reasons for
selling his vast interests in the manu
facture of iron and steel, referred with
indorsement to an interview with him
printed in a London paper today. In this
interview Mr. Carnegie was asked if he
had sold from fear or dislike of the trusts
and was quoted as replying:
"The trusts have never frightened me
and the Carnegie Steel company has no
occasion to be afraid of them as it is the
greatest property of its kind the world
has ever seen or probably ever will see.
I did not sell out because business
not prosperous, it never was so prosper- 1
ous, nor were its prospects ever so good.
I sold in pursuance of a policy deter
mined upon long ago not to spend my j
old age in business, struggling after more I
dollars. I believe in developing a digni- [
fied and unselfish life after 60."
Mr. Carnegie's attention was called to !
a paragraph in a London paper which j
referred to his famous declaration that
"to be rich is to die disgraced." and he ;
was asked what he was going t i do with ;
the $100,000,000 he had amassed,
"Teil the editor," replied Mr. Carnegie.
"to watch and fee. I hop? I shall ne t
sometimes do- j
as a man with !
but very littl
-d from
:-tice at
!
!
;
j
j
I
Dr. Wix.
The ladies will have exclusive use of
Gramling's Turk!; h bath parlors on Tues
dajs and Fridays with specially trained
female attendants, 41 N. Main.
Lr. Rinehart, dentist. ITrnr.easy block.
CASTOR IA
For Infants and Children.
file Kind You Have Always Bought
Rears the
öv -T.r.turc cl
One dollar shoe sale, commencing
Monday, May 8 . Don't mis* it. 25 West
Park. T as sell's. *
DR. MED. G. 1E0 GAGENBGRGSR
Deutscher Arst, 4Jr VV. Varie. Butto. Tel. «uo.
Abdominal Diseuses Surgery. Dis
eases of Women and Chud-eu. micioscod
Vcal and Chemical Urinary ..«lalvsls Mufa
WHAT DO I WANT?
Read the Wants below and you may find it. If you
don't, put in an advertisement of your wants and we
will guarantee quick returns.
WAN T A DVS
2 Cents Per Word for First Dsuo
1 Cent Per Word After First Issue
$1.00 Per Line Per Mcnth.
EMPLOYMENT.
WANTED—TWO GOOD HONEST CAN
vassers; ones willing to hustle. Good
money to right parties. Call 417 South
Arizona street.
WANTED
educated young man will pay
$-0 for assistance to any position. Ad
dress X. Y. Z. Inter Mountain.
______
WANTED — BY
AN AGENT, DISTRIBU
tion Tailoring Co., 417 South Arizona
street, Butte.
dressmaker
South Arizona.
7' ' ~~~--"
*- ... - ........ ^' '
A FIRST-CLASS
work by the day. 427 j
in
... families, $1.30 per tiav. Suits at
home. $0.00 up. Address P. O. Box 1224,
Butte.
MONTANA EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
will furnish help of all kinds. Room 5
16 W. Broadway, Butte.
business chances.
FOR SALE—26-ROOM ED LODGING
house; rooms full. Must be sold at
once for $900. Come quick. Case &
Simpson, 26 East Broadway.
___ _______
THREE HA RDWOOD BED ROOM
Suits cheap. 127 West Park.
——-------------
FOR SALE OR RENT—LADIES LOOK
ing for a business will find our lodging
houses, millinery and confectionery
stores worth investigating. Jackson &
Cox, 17 West Granite.
~—--—-— ------—
* SALOON BUSINESS,
centrally located, with lease, stock and
xtures; will net you 6 per cent per
™° nt 1 ° n T , tlh ; /"'estment of $1,000.
Lynch & Baeheler, 19 New Bee Hive
„ n prv „ HnT - e „
SALE—o-ROOM BRICK HOUSE,
building.
FOR SALE—3-ROOM BRICK
lot 30x100 feet; $1,000. Reid & Kennedy,
3 West Broadway, upstairs.
CALIORAP H, UPRIGHT GRAND
piano, -invalid's commode, for sale. 640
Ea-st Broadway.
FOR SALE—GREAT SNAP IN LARGE
paying lodging house. Raid & Kenne
dy, 3 West Broadway, upstairs.
_ _________________
a. SN A P_5-ROOM PLASTERED
house. Weist Side, " $800, worth $L100
terms easy. Cobban, Casey & Day, 33
West Granite
FOR SALE—WE HAVE A PROPERTY
for $6,500 that rents for $160 per month;
modern houses; everything in good re
pair and in a desirable location. See
Lynch & Baeheler.
FOR SALE-BUTCHER SHOP, VERY
central, fine cash trade, cheap. John
son & Pinkston, Owsley block.
MUST BE SOLD AT ONCE — 8-ROOM
brick house and a 3-room frame, West
Side, for $2,300, now renting for $67.50
per month; almost 30 per cent on-your
money. Cobban, Casey & Day, 33 West
Granite.
NEW BRICK BLOCK. WITH GOOD
view and plenty of light, cheap. 205
South Arizona.
FOP. SALE —FINE, HIGH-GRADE
upright piano, nearly new. Inquire
Butte Exchange Furniture company.
SMITH & MAHONEY, OPPOSITE THE
Montana hotel, largest real estate
dealers in Anaconda. Lodging houses
and business chances.
FINEST RESIDENCE ON THE WEST
side for $ 4,000, worth $6,500. Party leav
ing city of Butte for their health. W. H.
Winters.
FURNISHED ROOMS.
was______________
PENT—FL4T OF FOUR pomp
FOR , , , ROOMS.
beautifully furnished fine neighbor
^ /'v ïflock P-nkston,
' J
FOR RENT-ONE NICELY FUKNISH
ed room very reasonable; good loca
tion. 501 South Colorado street.
FOR RENT—ONE NICE FRONT ROOM
well furnished; will rent reasonable.
509 Sou tli Colorado street.
Foil RENT—ONE NICELY FURNISH
ed front room suitable for two gontle
men, one block west of Main street.
Rent reasonable. 430 Colorado street.
FOR RENT—ONE VERY PLEASANT
front room; well furnished; only five
minutes walk from Main street. Will
rent reasonable. Best location In the
city. 407 West Quartz street.
SHERMAN HOUSE, 107 W. QUART a.
furnished rooms, with bath, electric
light, etc., at reasonable rates.
FOR RENT—NEWLY FURNISHED
rooms. In new brick building, corne»- of
Arizona and Mercury streets: tran
sients solicited.
X. L. N. T.—COMFORTABLE SITTING
room. Prompt calls. Steam heat and
electric lights. 27 South Main. Bods
25c and 50c.
CLAIRVOYANT
SICE LILLIAN BELLMONT'S ADVF.R
tisement cut of hand on other pages.
The Argyle, 68 West Broadway.
MRS. HAZEL EARL, PSYCHIC AND
clairvoyant reader; past, present and
future correctly read. This gifted lady
has no equal; she gives accurate mar
ket quotations, psycliometertzes ore,
and gives advice on all legitimate busi
ness. A call will convince you of her
accuracy. Spiritual circles every Sun
day and Friday evenings, Room 6, Ë1
wood block.
for rent
SUMMER HOME FOR RENT—WITH
plenty of grounds and garden and sup
ply of wood; six rooms; $25 per month.
J. H. Fariss & Bro., Insurance and
Rental Agents, ' Silver Bow block.
NEWLY PAPERED MODERN HOUSE,
four large rooms. 229 East Platinum,
east of Arizona.
FURNISHED HOUSES
FOR RENT —A NICE 3-ROOMED
house; newly built. lient very reason
able. Call at 121 East Aluminum St.
FOR KENT-ONE NICE FURNISHED
cabin; suitable for two gentlemen, man
and wife. 402 South Idaho street.
j
FOR RENT—THREE-ROOM FUR
nished house close In. Two unfurnish
ed houses, four and six rooms respec
tively. J. H. Maloney, 33 West Granite
street.
FOR RENT— 932 WEST GRANITE TWO
furnished house keeping rooms $15;
three unfurnished housekeeping rooms
$11.50.
ASSAYER3.
A. B. ROMBAUER, SUCCESSOR TO
Carney & Hand, ass.ayer and chemist,
103 East Broadway, opposite McDer
mott hotel, P. O. Box 114.
BRADEN & BAPTY, ASSAYERS AND
Chemists, 119 Hamilton street (Carney
6 Hands' old stand); work carefuly and
promptly attended to. Office open from
7 a. m. to 9:30 p. in.
DRESSMAKING.
FIRST-CLASS DRESSMAKING; SEW
ing of all kinds. 707 Utah avenue.
FINE DRESSMA-KING, TAILOR SYS
tem, work guaranteed, prices reason
able. 23 West Granite street, Room 27,
upstairs.
MONEY TO LOAN
MONEY TO LOAN—MONEY TO LOAN
in largo or small quantities on real es
tate security. I also have money to
loan on. household furniture. Chas. L.
Smith, 23 West Granite street.
MONEY TO LOAN—$100,000 TO LOAN
on real estate security. I t«n furnish
any amount desired, at the very lowest
rate of interest. W. H Winters, Ows
ley block.
MILLINERY.
MILLINERY AND HAIR DRESSING
parlors; latest styles and fashions. 114
West Broadway.
SPECIALISTS
MRS. R. BROWN, 112 WEST DALY
street, Waikervllle, for/nerly 308 South
Dakota street, cures all female com
plaints with her own medicine.
MEDIUMS.
MME. GUY, 203 S. DAKOTA STREET.
Circles every Tuesday and Friday even
ings.
MISCELLANEOUS.
FRANK W. HOCKING, GENERAL
agent Grand Union Tea Co., carries the
finest lines of teas, coffees, baking
powders, spices, extracts, etc. Tickets
given with each purchase. Office 519
Colorado street.
STRAYED FROM HOME GRAY MARE
branded H on left hip. Return to 725
South Montana and receive reward.
JOHN STECH, THE PRACTICAL
boot and shoe maker, is now located at
128 South Main street. All kinds of
work neatly done.
EGGS FOR HATCHING, FROM
thoroughbred Buff Leghorns;
splendid layers, none better.
Appiy at No. 1020 Nevada
street.
MUSIC.
E. J. PASSMORE — PROFESSOR OF
Ringing, organ and piano. Studio 102 E.
Granite street.
Good Jersey
Milch Cows
——For Sale
Driving Horses for Sale.
Inquire
M Fan
29 W. Broadway.

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