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Daily inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1881-1901, May 13, 1899, Image 4

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053057/1899-05-13/ed-1/seq-4/

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What Is Our Loss
Is Yoor Gain
Owing to the backwardness of the sea
son, t'<e Red Root Shoe Co. has placed on
sale their large and elegant stock of
spring and summer goods. Over $60,000
worth of
Shoes, Slippers
and Oxfords
In all the lates shapes and colors at less
than eastern prices.
Remember these are all this season's
goods.
Any broken lots of last season at half
cost.
It will be to your interest to bear these
prices in mind:
Men's Dress Shoes, round or square toe..
$ 1.00
Men's Dross Shoes in Tan Cadet toe....
«1.5^
Men's Viel Oxfords for street ............
$1.50
I.adies' chocolate vesting top shoe, coin
toe, sizes 2',2 to 7 ........................
$1.65
Ladies' chocolate vioi lace, size 2% to S..
$1.50
Ladies' white or black strap sandals....
$l. r O
Ladies' tan and black Oxfords, hand
turned, size 2 lit to 8 ....................:
$ 1 . 00
Misses' Shoes, tan or black, size UV- to 2
95c
Children's Shoes from 25c up.
The Sale is Now Going on.
Red Boot Shoe Co.
33 North Main
I_. .A. DIETS
We wish to call your attention to our
silk line of High-Class Novelties.
A NEW DEPARTMENT
In Butt.;, where we make to order, at
moderate prices, many articles of Silk
wear. Silk Morning and Evening Gowns,
Silk Dressing Sacques, Silk Matinees,
Negligees. Silk Wrappers. Waists. Skirts,
Muslin and S lk Underwear and Hosiery.
Rooms 47-4S, Owsley Block, Butte,
Mont. _
«EINBERG BROS A EBSTEIN
Groceries
17 pounds Sugar....................
15 pounds fancy French Prunes.....
1 can Syrup.........................
2 cans California Jelly .............
20 pound pail Jelly ..................
5 pound glass Strawberry Preserves.
26 Boxes Matches ...................
1 dozen Fresh Eggs .................
2 sacks Table Salt (extra) ..........
10 cans California Blackberries......
1 23c jar French Mustard............
Very finest Minnesota Fiour sack...
Dates, pound ........................
15 pounds Raisins...................
S cans finest imported sardines .....
Finestcocoanut, pound package____
Pickles 75c galion, 20c qu»rt.
COOK'S
331 E. Park St., Butte
WE BUY
Sell, Repair. Store. Pack and Ship, Rent
or Exchange Furniture with you
Butte Exch'g. Furniture Co.
J. CHAUVIN, Agent.
42 W. Broadway.Butte
t+J u-/
*
S3**.
*
xw
■uiflÿSi
j
I
!
!
;
I
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i
Q-eis Stoves:
For Sale or Rent.
KID Dirt > Smoke or Ashes to Eothc<
with. ,
BUTTE GAS LIGHT AND?
COKE GO. i
48 East Broadway. I
!
!
-
;
DR. CHUNG'S
Celebrated Herb Sanitari
um guarantees to cure all
diseases by moans of his fa
mous Chinese medicines
which have never before
been introduce I into this
___country. He has cured
tliotisaiKis and can eure you. Advice free.
*1 West Galena street, Butte, Mont.
a
CARNEGIE IS
TO RETIRE
He Tells What Millionaires
Should do
WHEN THEY REACH SIXTY
Notable Examples ol Americans
Whose Fortunes are Now
UpHftln? Humanity.
New York. May 13.—A dispatch to the
Tribune from London says: Mr. Andrew
Carnegie has nothing to say about his
business affairs except to express his
gratification that the time has come when
he can refuse to make any more money;
and devote liis leisure to a wise admin
istration of his fortune. While he has
been misquoted in saying that he consid
ers it disgraceful for a man to die rich, he
intends to spend th r remainder of his life
in carrying out his own gospel of wealth.
When asked for a statement of his views j
of the retirement of a rich man from busi
ness he made the folio wing statement:
"Well, there are only two courses for
multi-millionaires to follow. Some may
feel that although they have plenty to
retire on. they have very little to retire
to. Many men who retire fiom business
become very unhappy. They have not
cultivated other sources of p leasure or
occupation. In this case men do not own
the millions, the- millions own them and .
the multi-millionaire is only a slave. Such
men will, no doubt, be less miserable if
they continue to the end and die like Mac
beth, with the harness on their backs. We
Americans do not retire generally as the
Britons themselves, because the Briton,
as a rule, iias a hobby apart ftoin his
business. Hr is not half so strenuous a;
business mar as the American but ho
usually has intense pleasure in his ooun
ti y place, in which he spends several days
a week. He may be an authority upon
gardening. ; f he goes in for roses, his
rcses take the finst premium in the flower
show. One friend I had went in for pigs.
He was a great manufacturer; he had a
species of pig called at'ter him. It does not 1
matter what it is'so that it is something.
He may breed horses at a loss. The prin
cipal win? merchant of the world does
so. When such men make a competence
and arrive at years of discretion, I mean
60 and over and retire, they have suffi
cient interest in other things to give them
happiness. Besides this, there is a wide
field of usefulness in distiict or local
public life which I have been privileged to
see during my visits paid to several well
known manufacturers in this country.
In this way Britor.s make a success of
life.
"No one can call human life a success
who does not so train himself as to enjoy
a happy, useful, dignified graceful old age.
Although this course 4s less generally
pursued by the American than the Briton,
still America is not without illustrious
example. Take Mr. Marquant. What a
noble example! He retired from busi
ness and the Metropolitan museum is his
da; ling care. Few people in New York
know the debt the city, yes the country,
owes to the erect, gracious old gentle
man. Take Mr. Kennedy, my feilow Scot;
who retired from business. As Mr. Ken
nedy told me long ago. he is busier than
ever. But busy in what? About the Pres
byterian hospital, the United Charities
building and many other kindred institu
tions. Take Mr. Jessup. Look at the mu
seum of natural history, of which he is
president and over which he watches with
fatherly care. Take Seth Low, who had
a large business, which he left to assume,
the presidency of Columbia university.
Take Charles Stewart Smith. See how
he leads a happy and useful life. Notv
all these men have not as their life work
miserable aims which end with self. They
are laboring for the good of others. I
could mention other names, but these
suffice for illustration.
"The question is whether such a grace
ful ending of life is not a higher life than
that pursued by me n who have far great
er fortunes than any of these, but never
thelcss art found still immersed in the
struggle for more personal gain, the final
summons finding them and their useless
hoards from which they are torn and
which, as a rule, are used after their
death in a nay that would rous? their in
dignation if they could look down. It is
the part of wisdom, then, for millionaires
to devote their declining years to put their
otherwise useless millions to some good
use. Brilliant as many of their invest
ments may have been, surely such invest
ment of their wealth would eclipse them
all.''
Mr. Carnegie will go to Scotland on
Tuesday and will return to America In
the autumn, where he expects to spend
the remainder of his life distributing his
wealth wisely and carrying out various
'plans of beneficence and taking an active
interest in politics. He grimly says that
his worst enemy is the man who will tell
him how to make more money.
A SPECIAL PLEA
FOR MATAAFA
Washington, May 13.—A special plea
for the cause of Mataafa has been re
ceived at the embassies interested in the
(Samoan question from rather a peculiar
source, namely, William Cooper, the late
municipal magistrate of Apia and a per
; son believed to be a British subject liv
DR. MED. 6. LEO RASEN BURQER
Deutscher Arzt, 4i W. Park. Butte. Tel. .ua
Abdominal DLeases Surgery, Dis
eases ut Women and ChnJ'en. Micros cop
tea! and Chemical l.rir.aij .. oalvsis Mads
HERE'S THE WINNER, SMOKE
"Quo Vadis" Cigars
TWO FOR 25 CENTS.
Best
Japan Ceylon
English Breakfast
JDoloDg Ideal Blend
Tea
ing in Auckland, N. Z. Mr. Cooper's
brief, which is printed, presents not only
the law in the case of the kingly suc
cession. but also shows an intimate ac
quaintance with the people and customs
of Samoans. Mr. Cooper regards the
situation as one of extreme gravity. He
says that the powers have to deal with
this dilemma: That if they undertake
to enforce the decision of Chief Justice
Chambers seating Tanu. all previous
scenes of bloodshed will be eclipsed, 1
while if they fail to enforce the decision j
the court will be flouted with impunity.
Mr. Cooper's brief refers td the pledge ■
given by Mataafa upon his return not
to interfere in the government and also ]
to his intimate relations with the German
government. He says the political situa
tion is insufferable and there must be
extensive modifications of the teraty in
view of the fact that annexation of the
islands by anyone of the powers is im
probable.
LONDON SEASON
IN FULL SWING
-With beautiful, sum
;
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M'likc weather, this week, the season j
'ms to finally be 111 lull swing. The ,
Dis, pictuie exhibitions and Rotten j
P V , u li
d at Hurlinghame j
icsc country clubs
London, May 1
merlike
seem
hot
row are crowded daily, while numerous |
parties given by hostesses prominent in j
the social world till every night. The 1
polo season has opened '*■ TT ---'— 1 ----
and Ranelagh. and the
are also attracting large numbers 01 j
fashionable people Many Americans ;
are already here and the hotel and shop- .
keepers are jubilant at the prospect of a
laige invasion from over-sea.
1 he greatest interest centers in the
queen s visit to London next week to hold ;
a drawing-room and lay the foundation ■
stone of the Albert and Victoria museum
ât Kensington. Tuesday's drawing-room, ; i
naturally, .will be the most brilliant or |
the season. There has been a rush of
great ladies to attend this particular |
function. but a great deal of heart-burn- 1
....
The queen :s to come from Wind
Monday and will visit Kensington ;
has been occasioned by the system of
ballot which the new Lord Chamberlain
lias inaugurated and under which many
r imminent people are excluded. By this
novel mode of selection the names of
well known peeresses and of people un
known to fame are mixed together in a j
manner that is very distasteful to the
former. Several titled ladies, when they '
found that they had been unsuccessful ;
in the ballot, made representations to the j
highest quarters, with the- result that
even at the last moment there have been
changes in the list. In spite of this, a !
number of well known ladles had their |
claims ignored. Mrs. Joseph H. Choate,
wife of the United States ambassador ;
here, will present to the queen Mrs. Al- I
fred Parish, her sister. Miss Jennings of ]
New York and Miss Nora Neef of Chi- !
cago.
pot on
, , . - „ .
palaee, where her old apartments have ;
been renovated preparatory to opening
thu palace to the public. Her majesty's j
will be of a sentimental natur
the rooms where she lived as a young girl
have been restored to their former con
dition. Her bedroom contains show-cases
filled with her old toys and her dolls'
house stands on a table in the ante
chamber.
The ceremony of laying the foundation
stone of the Albert and Victoria museum
on Wednesday will be a very interesting
one. The queen will drive through the
streets lined with troops from Bucking- !
other
royal
pers
•0 li
at tli
e 22 te
of
the
raised
will
be
A great pavi
lion
will
ham palace, the royal cortege bein
1 eorted by the lifeguards. Her majesty
; will be accompanied by several princes
I and princesses and
j ages will meet her
1 museum, where a
j reserved for them.
j be erected, in which will be seated the
; ambassadors, ministers of the cabinet
and l ading state officials. The Prince
of Wales will receive the queen. Th : na
tional anthem will be sung by pupils of]
the royal college of music. Afterwards ;
a madrigale, especially composed by Mr.
j Alfred Austin, the poet laureate, will be
sung to special music written by Sir
Alexander Mackenzie, principal of the
royal academy of music. His grace, the
archbishop of Canterbury, primate of
ail England, will read the prayers. The
event is destined to be the occasion of a
great patriotic demonstration.
There lias been considerable anxiety
this week relative to the health of the .
Duke of York, who has been confined to I
h's roomS with a severe cold. The duke,
himself, made light of the matter, and,
speaking with a visitor about th solici
tude of the press on his b 'half, said:
"Really, I might almost be a Kip
ling."
tHOK T um: l'AI K
This beautiful resort can lie secured for
picnics or excursions on very liberal
terms.
class management guaranteed. For fur
ther particulars address or call on
OH AS. LIEBENSTEIN,
Room 52S Hi nn«ssy Building.
Perfect train service and first
Finest trown bridge w irk. Dr. V.'ix.
CASTOR IA
Fof Infanta and Children.
Hie Kind You Han Always Bought
B'vars tha
Ui'Ti&ture of
WHAT TO DO
FOR DEWEY
New York Times has a Novel
Suggestion.
A POPULAR SUBSCRIPTION
Should be Taken up by the News
papers and a Residence Erected
For ths Admiral.
1 c i, Qll v, r „ ,« ...
j 0 ^ or ^ ewej ' ' t * 1 * 3 morning
say ® :
■ What shall we do for the man who has
done so much for us? That is the ques
] tion which lias for a long time been agi
New York, May 13.—The New
Times in an editorial entitled '
Y 01k
What
tating the American people. It is quite
true that according to our precedents we
have not been niggardly in recognition
of tiie great service of "Commodore"
Dewey, as he was a year ago. But there
is a persistent and prevailing feeling that
we ought to do more, that the American
nation in some unofficial and spontane
ous way should recognize the services of
Dewey as the British nation officially
recognized the services of Wellington,
when it presented him with the estate of
; Strathfieldsay. Evidently it will not do
I to make any "exclusive" acknowledg
I ment of the services of an American hero
j to whom all Americans feel equally
grateful. Evidently it will not do to
1
j leave him at the mercy of a group of m'l
, ii ona ires. Evidently it will not do t
j exclu de from the national testimonial 1
" ny not appeal directly to the public'™,,
j through its immediate organs and agents j
the newspapers which get their living by
| the admiral any American citizen who
j desires to bear his part in it
1 why not appeal directly
' '
j representing its sentiments 9 There
; som e 20,090 periodicals in the United
. states which are entitled to transmission
as such through the mails. Among them i
are 2,119 daily papers, which represent I
most immediately and most accurately j
; the sentiment of the United Stales Let •
■ us assume that only a fourth part of 1
these are in a position to act as collect
; i n g and distributing agents for a national
| Dewey testimonial, and that eacli of the=e
500 is willing to pledge itself to the col
| lection from its readers and the trans
1 mission to the appointed trustees of ib
sum of $500 for that fund. Surely this
estimate is moderate enough and surely
the amount of each individual subscrip-
tion which must be strictly fixed and
limited, is moderate enough to prevent
any newspaper from exploiting the ad-
for the purpose of advertising
e su li-
nt' tills
id ence
-- ,----- in Ute ;
I nitcd States he might prefer to put it 1
and the other half for liia personal use |
As a matter of fact, we believe that |
more than the number of periodicals we i
have named would be willing and eager !
to be included in the project. There is !
no reason why the aggregate should not
be correspondingly increased, with the |
rigorous limitation of each individual;
'subscription to $5C0, so that there should
; be no taint of se
j mirai
itself. And yet the aggregate of t 1
' script ions would be $250.000 Half
; should go to the erection of a re
j f or the admiral in whatever pla
" ■ ■
!
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!
................-3lf seeking or of advertis
; mg in the affair. This would be truly
a national and popular subscription The
j admiral would not beat liberty to refuse
it. since it would not be die creation of
any obligation on his part, but only the
recognition of an obligation on the part I
of the nation. Hr would not be able to *
refuse it if the whole amount were de- i
Posited, as it could and should be de« !
posited, subject to his order, before 1rs I
arrival upon his native shores. The j
president of the United States, the sec re- j
tary of state and the secretary of the j
treasury would be appropriate custodians j
! of the if«;d and their willingness to
su me it
granted.
custody may be taken
re '
»BX, 00 Per L'H* I 3
;
.
I WANTED—CHRISTIAN MAN OR WO- I
!
WA N T A D VS
2 Cents Per Word for First Issud
1 Cent Per Word Alter Fiist Itsua
Month.
EMPLOYMENT.
BOYS WANTED—GET US TWENTY
live subscribers at 20 cents per year,
and we will send you, free, a line silver
filled stem winder watch, guaranteed
three years. Story Teller Magazine,
231 Broadway, New York.
man to qualify for position trust. Salary
$900. Enclose inference and self-ad
drssed envelope to Secretary, care In
ter Mountain.
WANTED—TWO GOOD HONEST CAN
vassers; ones willing to hustle. Good
money to right parties. Call 417 South
Arizona street.
EDUCATED YOUNG 51 AN WILL PAY
$20 for assistance to any position,
dress X. Y. Z. Inter Mountain.
Ad
COMPETENT DRESSMAKER, TO SEW
in families, $1.50 per day. Suits at
home. $5.00 up. Address P. O. Box 1221.
Butte.
MONTANA EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
will furnish help of all kind*. Room 5
16 W. Broadway. Butte.
BUSINESS CHANCES.
FOR SALE—LEASE AND FURNITURE
of 8-room house; 8 roomers; 18 board
ers; center of city, $850. Lynch &
Bachelor, 19 New Bee Hive building.
FOR SALE—8-ROOM BRICK WITH
good stable. West Side: less than c ost.
Price $3,200. Lynch & Bachelor, 19
New Bee Hive building.
FOR SALE—LEASE AND FURNITURE
of 12-room boarding and lodging house
North Main street: rent $50; price $850.
Lynch & Bachelor. 19 Now Bee Hive
building.
WHAT DO I WAT ?
Read the Wants below and ^you may find it. If you
don't, put in an advertisement of your wants and we
will guarantee quick returns.
$300 CASH, BALANCE EASY MONTH
ly payments, buys 4-room house and
2-room house, Colorado street, cheap.
See this. McMillan & Floyd, 47 East
Broadway.
ALL KINDS OF RESIDENCE AND
business properties. Lynch & Bachelor,
19 New Bee Hive building.
FOR SALE — 35-ROOM LODGING
House. Easy price and payments. Reid
& Kennedy, 3 West Broadway.
FOR Sale—NEW 7-ROOM HOUSE ON S.
■Main street. $1.900. Small payment
down. Reid & Kennedy, 3 West Broad
way.
FOR SALK—SMALL LODGING HOUSE
cheap. Reid & Kennedy, 3 West Broad
way.
MERRY GO ROUND FOR SALE IN
good condition. Address T. O. New
man corner Wyoming and Porphyry
Butte.
FOR SALE—FURNITURE OF 3-ROOM
brick, cheap, and house to rent. 818
South Main.
FURNITURE FOR SALE OF EIGHT
roomed boarding house. 317 South
Idaho, Butte.
FOR SALE
room. 212
FURNITURE OR TH REE
South Montana street.
FOR SALE — 26-ROOM LODGING
house; modern. Fine location. John
son & Pinkston, Owsley block.
FOR SALE — 35-ROOM LODGING
house. Steam heat and electric lights.
Best location and a good paying
proposition. Johnson & Pinkston,
Owsley block.
* ? K
hov
SALE — 11-ROOM LODGING
house. Furniture nearly now ail'd a
good bargain for some one. Johnson
& Pinkston. Owsley block.
I--------------------
FOR SALE—PRIVATE BOARDING
house, West Side. Good location and
about 25 boarders,
stun, Owsley block.
-----—
Johnson & Pink
FOil SALE—FURNITURE OF A FOTJR
room lint and a three-room cottage. ;
Both new furniture and a big bargain. '
Johnson & Pinkston, Owsley block. ;
FOR SALE—SALOON DOING A GOOD
paying business. Centrally located.
Johnson & Pinkston, Owsley block. 1
329 ACRES OF LAND 9 MILES FROM !
Anaconda. First water light 50 inches;
160 acres fenced with log house, barn,
and chicken houses. Here is a chance
for $600. Mahoney and Smith, 2Û9 Main
street ,Anaconda.
FOR SALE—HORSE ANG WAGON $30
if taken at once. 5 North Montana.
FOR SALE—26-ROOMED LODGING
house; looms full. Must be sold at
once for $900. Come quick. Case &
Simpson, 26 East Broadway.
I
j
i
[
THREE
Suits c
HARDWOOD BEDROOM
ap. 124 West Park.
FOR SALE — SALOON BUSINESS,
centrally located, with lease, stock and
fixtures; will net you 6 per cent per
month on tlie investment of $1,000.
Lynch & Bachelor, 19 New Bee Hive
building.
FOR SALE—WE HAVE A PROPERTY j
for $6.500 that rents for $160 per month;
modern houses; everything in good re
pair and in a desirable location. See
Lynch & Bacheler.
NEW BRICK BLOCK, WITH GOOD
view and plenty of light, cheap. ' 205
South Arizona.
REPUBLIC MINING STOCKS APwE ,
low.
show
In 60 days all listed stocks will
an advance that will give a
handsome profit on investments made
now.
Ajax ............................. 4c
Mountain Lion ...................$1.40
San Juan ......................... 2e
Bryan & Sewell .................. l%c
Butte & Boston .................. 7c
Jim Blaine ....................... 39c
Anaconda ....................... 7>,^c
Flag Hill ........................ 4c
10,000 Montana Standard. Conroy & Co.,
Brokers, 61 East Park, Butte.
FURNISHED ROOMS.
TWO NICE FURNISHED ROOMS TO
rent. Can be used for housekeeping
purposes. 617 East Front.
TWO FURNISHED ROOMS FOR
light housekeeping $10. Lodging rooms
for men $3. 214 North Jackson street,
Butte.
FOR RENT—ONE NICE FRONT ROOM
well furnished; will lent reasonable.
509 South Colorado street.
FOR RENT—WELL FURNISHED
light rooms. Electric light and baths.
Rates reasonable. Albemarle House,
44 West Granite.
FOR RENT—ONE NICELY FURNISH
cd front room suitable for two gentle
men, one block west of Main street.
Rent reasonable. 430 Colorado street.
SHERMAN HOUSE, 107 W. QUART/,,
furnished rooms, with bath, electric
light, etc., at reasonable rates.
FOR RENT—NEWLY FURNISHED
rooms, in r.ew brick building, corner of
Arizona and Mercury street?.; tran
sients solicited.
X. L. N. T.—COMFORTABLE SITTING
room. Prompt calls. Steam heat and
electric lights. 27 South Main. Beds
25c and 50e.
TAILORS
NOW IS THE TIME, PERFECT FIT
guaranteed; your order for a stylish
suit at your own price, at H. J. Pissot's
tailor shop, 12 South Wyoming street
FOR RENT
FOR RENT—Desk room and storage
room. Kelly block, 77 East Park street,
basement.
FOR RENT—HOUSE CLOSE IN, WEST
Side, and furniture for sale to party
renting. Enquire J. E. Rickards Co.,
49 East Broadway.
SUMMER HOME FOR RENT—WITH
plenty of grounds and garden and sup
ply cf wood; six rooms; $25 per month.
J. H. Fariss & Bro.. Insurance and
Rental Agents, ' Silver Bow block.
NEWLY PAPERED MODERN HOUSE,
four large rooms. 229 East Platinum,
east of Arizona.
FURNISHED HOUSES
THREE ROOM FURNISHED HOUSE
for rent, cheap.
Granite.
J. H. Moloney, 33 W.
FOR RENT —A NICE 3-ROOMED
house; newly built. Rent very reason
able. Call at 121 East Aluminum St.
FOR RENT—ONE NICE FURNISHED
cabin: suitable for two gentlemen, man
and wife. 402 South Idaho street.
DRESSMAKING.
FINE DRESSMAKING, TAILOR SYS
tern, work guaranteed, prices reason
able. 23 West Granite street. Room 27,
upstairs.
MONEY TO LOAN
;
'
;
1
!
$1,000 TO $5,000 TO LOAN ON IM
proved city property. Two desirable
lots in Ophlr addition $400 each; $150
buys lots In George Cobban's addition.
Warrants*deed and abstract furnished;
perfect title guaranteed. We build
„ houses on monthly payments. Have
mines to lease and shafts to sink. Ad
dress the owner, George A. Cobban,
Room 10, Scott house.
MONEY TO LOAN—MONEY TO LOAN
in large or small quantities or. real eB
'cate security. I also have money to
loan on household furniture. Chas. I*
Smith, 22 West Granite street.
MONEY TO LOAN—$100,000 7*0 LOAN
I on real estate security. I can furnish
j any amount desired, at the very lowest
i rate of Interest. W. H Winters, Owe
[ ley block.
MILLINERY.
MILLINERY ANY* HAIR DRESSING
parlors; latest styles and fashions. 114
West Broadway.
SPECIALISTS
MRS. R. BROWN, 112 WEST DALY
street, Walkerville, formerly 308 South
Dakota street, cures all female com
plaints with her own medicine.
j
MEDIUMS.
MME. GUY, 203 S. DAKOTA STREET.
Circles every Tuesday and Friday even
ings.
MISCELLANEOUS.
WANTED—THE PUBLIC TO KNOW
that I have to stay. That my office is
open for free consultation on all dis
eases. Hours to to G; 7 to 9. Prof O.
Sullivan, No. 312 West 'Broadway,
Butte, Mont. Tel. 215.
, WANTED— 1 TO BUY J ?URNITURE FOR
three-room or four-room house,
dress P. P.
Ad
WANTED —TO RENT A SMALL
house or three rooms furnished or un
furnished. Address T. T.
WHEELS SLIGHTLY USED CHEAP.
Oposite Library.
JOHN STECH, THE PRACTICAL
boot and shoe maker, is now located at
128 South Main street. All kinds of
work neatly done.
4Mb EGGS FOR H ATCHING, FROM
AKA thoroughbred Buff Leghorns;
nfl splendid layers, none better.
JKl Apply at No. 1020 Nevada
WlaHB street.
MUSIC.
E. J. PASSMORE — PROFESSOR OF
singing, organ and piano. Studio 102 E.
Granite street.
CLAIRVOYANT
SEE LILLIAN BELLMONT'S ADVER
tisement cut of hand on other pages.
The Argyle, 68 West Broadway.
MRS. HAZEL EARL, PSYCHIC AND
clairvoyant reader; past, present and
future correctly read. This gifted lady
has no equal; she gives accurate mar
ket quotations, psychometerizes ore,
and gives advice on all legitimate busi
ness. A call will convince you of her
accuracy. Spiritual circles every Sun
day and Friday evenings, Room 6, El
wood block.
ASSAYER5.
A. B. ROMBAUER, SUCCESSOR TO
Carney & Hand, aspayer and chemist,
103 East Broadway, opposite McDer
mott hotel, P. O. Box 114.
BRADEN & BAPTY, ASSAYERS AND
Chemists, 119 Hamilton street (Carney
6 Hands' old stand); work carefuly and
promptly attended to. Office open from
7 a. m. to 9:30 p. m.
Dr. Rinehart, dentist, Hennessy block.

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