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Daily inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1881-1901, May 20, 1899, Image 4

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Hat Is Oar Loss
Is Yonr Gaia
Owing to the backwardness of the sea
son, the Red Boot Shoe Cd. has placed on
sale their large and elegant stock of
spring and summer goods. Over $60,000
worth of j . _
Shoes, Slippers
and Oxfords
In all the'latos shapes and colors at less
than eastern prices.
Remember these are all this season s
goods.
Any broken lots of last season at half
cost.
It will be to your Interest to bear these
prices In mind:
Men's Dress Shoes, round or square toe..
$ 1.00
Men's Dress Shoes In Tar) Cadet toe....
$1.50
Men's Viel Oxfords for street ............
$1.50
Ladies' chocolate vesting top shoe, coin
toe, sizes 2% to 7 ........................
$1.65
Ladies' chocolate vici lace, size 2*4 to 8..
$1.50 j
Ladies' white or black strap sandals.... j
$1X0
Ladies' tan and black , Oxfords, hand
turned, size 2% to 8 ....................I
SI.OOJ
Misses' Shoes, tan or black, size 11% to 2
95c
Children's Shoes from 23c up. j
The Sale is Now Going on. j
Red Boot Shoe Co.
35 North Main
LADIES
We wish to call your attention to our
Bilk line of High-Class Novelties.
A NEW DEPARTMENT
In Butt>*, where we make to order, at
moderate prices, many articles of Silk
wear. Silk Morning and Evening Gowns,
Silk Dressing Sacques, Silk Matinees,
Negligees, Silk Wrappers, Waists, Skirts,
Muslin and S lk Underwear and Hosiery.
Rooms 47-48, Owsley Block, Butte,
Mont. _
WEINBERG BROS. & EPSTEIN
Groceries
25 pounds Beans ......................$1.00
I Good Broom ............ 25
1 pound Crackers .....................10
Fancy Cheese..........................15
Dunham's Cocoanut, pound pkg..... 30
10 pounds Coffee ..................... l.oo
15 pounds Raisins ......... l.oo
7 cans highest grade Bartlett Pears. 1.00
Mixed or Stick Candy, pound.........10
Flour—Best Minnesota, 50 pound sk. 1.15
Flour—Makes line bread, 50 pound sk .90
Hams and Bacon .....................10
13 cans first grade Milk.............. l.oo
36 boxes Matches .....................25
I keg Pickles ........................ 1.20
12 pounds Rice ....................... 1.00
1C pounds best Sugar ................ l.oo
75c can Syrup..........................45
3 Sacks Salt ....................!l0
COOK'S
331 E. Park St., Butte
WE BUY
Bell, Repair, Store, Pack and Ship, Rent
or Exchange Furniture with you.
Butte Exch g. Furniture Co.
J. CHAUVIN, Agent
42 W. Broadway,Butte
u J
taR
*
4 *
Vim.
wi"'!
Gets Stoves:
For Sale or Kent. <
NO Dirt, Smoke or Aslies to Bothe <
BUTTE CÄSTiGHT ANol
COKE GO.
48 East Broadway,
DR. CHUNG'S
Celebrated Iferb Sanitari
um guarantees to cure all
diseases bj moans of his fa
mous Chinese medicines
which have never before
bcon introduced into this
couutry. Hq has cured
thousands and can cure you. Advice free
n West Galen* street, Butte, Mont.
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DISCONTENT
IN HAVANA
Over the Actions of Secetary
of War Alger
GIVING UP OF THE ARMS
Of the Cuban Troops Is Attended witb
a Conflict of Authority—Gen.
Gomez is Sullen.
Havana, May 19.—Havana is In a fer
ment again over the idea that the Wash
ington administration has determined to !
take the arms of the Cuban troops and
to retain them In military possession. !
This view of the latest news from Wash- j
ington has been telegraphed to the vari- j
ous cities. Governor General Brooke is
thus far unaware save through the press j
telegrams of any dissatisfaction on thej
part of General Alger, secretary of war, 1
with his (.Brooke's) plan to have the arms
deposited in care of the mayors of muni
cipalities. nor has he received any inkling
of the secretary's purpose to lay the mat
ter before President McKinley. Conse
quently, unless instructions to the con
trary are received from the Washington
administration the governor general's
orders respecting the distribution of the
$3.000.000 as modified will be issued to
morrow. The secretary of war has been
informed as to the substance of this or
der in the usual course of business.
Havana's midday newspapers publish
the Washington news, some of them
commenting editorially upon it. As the
point about where the arms are to be kept ;
appears to be thought of vital import- !
ance in Washington the conviction an- !
nounced there that the mayors can not
be trusted with them is a cause of fresh
discontent, just at the moment when the 1
various complications appeared to be un- j
raveled. The mayors are the appointees
of the governor general and when the !
military assembly dissolved they were:
made its representatives to receive the.
arms. Article four of the agreement be
tween General Gomez and Robert P.
Porter, President McKinley's special rep
resentative, runs as follows: ''The;
Cubans shall surrender their arms to the:
Cuban assembly or Its representatives."
General Gomez, who at the time of com
ing to the agreement with Mr. Porter,
had not quarreled with the assembly, in
sisted upon this point. Since the quarrel
he has again raised the point repeatedly,
saying also that Mr. Porter brought full
written authority from President McKin
ley and in the president's name agreed
that the arms should go into the custody
of the assembly or its representatives.
At Monday night's meeting of the so
ciety of veterans of independence or
ganized by former members of the as
sembly, the speakers dilated upon ar
ticle four, asserting that the president's
plenipotentiary had agreed to deposit
the arms with the representatives of the
assembly, while, through the connivance
of Gomez, they were to be surrendered to
the American army.
La Discussion says: "Secretary Alger
appears to wish to provoke a conflict
here. He is more distinguished in the
United States as a business man than
as a politician and his relations with
certain syndicates are well known. He
opposes everything that Cuba wants and
favors everything that would cause feel
ing and provoke excitement. His atti
tude prompts the question what does he
want? Does he desire a war here similar
to that in the Philippines? We are forced
to believe that he only approves what is
unsatisfactory to Cuba."
Cubans of prominence object to talk
ing for publication on the subject, but
wherever they have been interviewed
they say without exception that such
an order as is referred to in the press
dispatches from Washington would cause
much trouble and would still further sep
arate Cuba from the United States. The
manifesto of General Gomez issued last
evening is unsatisfactory to the military
administration because its author failed
to disband the army. He had been asked
to include a paragraph directing the
various commands to dissolve and had
said he was in doubt as to whether he
was authorized to disband the army,
promising to reflect upon the matter. His
attitude at headquarters yesterday was
quite different from his previous bear
ing and it soon became obvious that he
wished to discontinue giving any advice,
even on the subject of the payment of the
troops.
THE TROOPS ARE
NOT DESIRED
Chicago, May 20.—A special to the
Times-Herald from Washington says:
While pressing the United States to agree
to the arbitration of t'he Aiaskan bound
ary question, the British government has
entered objections to the dispatch of ad
ditional American troops to the territory
and has made clear her desire to obtain
an Alaskan port. With respect to the
dispatch of three companies of regulars
to Alaska to patrol the boundary line,
the purpose this government had in view
was to preserve the peace and prevent
a conflict between Canadian and Ameri
can miners, which, reports from Governor
Brady show, is likely to ocSur at any
moment. It is probable, however, tiiat
in view of Great Britain's objection, the
troops will not be sent to Pyramid har
bor, as originally intended, but will be
located at a point accessible to the dis
puted territory, so as to be available in
case of emergency. In its representa
tions to the American government the
British government takes the view that
the dispatch of troops to Alaska is in
A STRAIGHT TIP—SMOKE
"Quo Vadis" Cigars
TWO FOR 25 CENTS.
tea
told only in
Packages
the nature of a menace, an indication
that the United States proposes to retain
by force the territory which it claims,
and that, consequently, it feels that iu
the interest of the friendly relations be
tween the two governments they should
not go.
Reunion of Roush Ridera.
Chicago, May 20.—Roosevelt's rough
riders, led by Colonel Roosevelt in per
son, may be one of the features of the
parade which will ba reviewed by Presi
dent McKinley at the laying of the cor
ner-stone of Chicago's new postoffice
building on October 9. The committee
planning the demonstration held a meet
ing at division army headquarters to dis
cuss preliminary arrangements, and the
members expressed strong hopes of get
ting Cbionel Roosevelt to attend. The
Chicago members of tlie rougit riders
regiment are arranging for a reunion of
the organization, to be held in this city
during the autumnal festival celebra
tion next fall, and Lieutenant H. W.
Weakley lias gone to Texas to promote
the interests of the proposed reunion.
HE KILLED HIS
BROTHER-IN-LAW
Greenville, Mo., May 19.— H. N. Haila
day, president of the Williamsville, j
Greenville and Southern railway, and j
president and general manager of the j
Halladay-Klatz Land and Lumber com- i
pany, was shot and killed this morning ■
by his brother-in-law, Monroe A. John- ,
son, at the latter's residence in this city. |
The tragedy was caused by Johnson's
jealousy of Halladay's attentions to his
wife.
Saturday night Johnson left town, os
tensibly to make a trip to St. Louis. In
stead, he went to Williamsville, and early
this morning returned to Greenville. Go
ing to his home, it is said, he found Halla
day and Mrs. Johnson together. Johnson
drew his pistol and fired at Halladay, who
fell to the tioor. Johnson fired three more
shots into Halladay's body. Johnson !
then went to several friends, and accom- |
panied them to Sheriff Schlater, surren- j
dering himself and telling wbat he had
done. He was immediately locked up.
Johnson and Halladay married sisters.
Johnson was in the employ of the lumber
company of which Halladay was presi
dent. Mrs. Johnson is a young and hand
some woman, and general surprise was
caused by the mention of her name in
connection with the affair. Halladay was
probably the richest man in this county.
He was 50 years old and lived at Will
iamsville. His fortune is estimated at
$500,000. The body will be taken to Will
iasville tomorrow for burial.
Johnson has made a statement to his
friends, but refuses to discuss the shoot
ing otherwise beyond saying that he had
provocation for what he did.
TELEGRAPHIC BRIEFS
Beaver Dam, Wis., May 20.—Addison
Parker, aged 52. a well known turfman,
committed suicide by shooting himself in
the head with a revolver. Parker for
years was associated with Robert Boa
ner of New York.
New York, May 20.—A dispatch from
Manila says: Col. Kobbe remains at
Canaba. General Lawton is marching
south from San Isidro. General Mac
Arthur remains at San Fernando. The
Nebraska regiment has returned to Ma
nila for a rest.
New York, May 20.—The congregation
of Plymouth church, Brooklyn, at a lively
meeting last night, set apart next Thurs
day night for a discussion on the ques
tion of the attitude to be assumed by the
church toward the Philippine war. This
action was favored by Thomas G. Sher
man and opposed by Stephen V. White
and H. C. King. The result is a victory
for the anti-imperialist faction.
Chicago, May 20.—Dispatches from New
York announce the engagement of Gladys
Wallace, the actress, who has just closed
an engagement with W. H. Crane, to
Samuel Insull, a millionaire of this city.
Mr. Insull confirms the report. Mr. In
sull is president of the Chicago Edison
Electric Light company and will be at
the head of the Illinois Electric Trans
portation company which is preparing to
put automobiles in service.
Chicago, May 20.—Responses to the in
vitations sent out by the civic federation
for the conference to be held June 26-28
on combinations and trusts, have already
begun coming in. Governors McLaurin
of Mississippi, Roosevelt of New York,
Wolcott of Massachusetts and Pingree
of Michigan will appoint delegates and
attend personally if their duties do not
interfere. Favorable replies have also
been received from Governor Poynter of
Nebraska and Governor Mount of In
diana.
New York, May 20.—The suggestion
that a system of trading in flour options
be established on the produce exchange
which has been discussed at intervals
among members of the New York flour
trade, has been revived within the last
few days, but no definite plan regarding
the matter has been formed. A promi
nent trader in speaking of the matter,
said that he doubted If the option market
proposed would have the desired effect
of making this city an export center. Ho
said that a discrimination in railway
rates by which flour and grain may be
shipped here for export much cheaper
than for local delivery had much to do
with keeping business away.
UP THE RIVER
Met With But Slight Resistance
From Rebels
WELCOMED BY THE NATIVES
Maj. Geo. Otis Refused to Entertain
Any Proposition as to
an Armistice,
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Manila, May 20.—7:50 a. m.—The expe
dition up t lie Rio Grande river met with
no resistance except at tiie outskirts of
San Lucis. There several hundred Fili
pinos were entrenched 011 the banks of
the stream. The rebels retreated beyond j
Candaba and the gunboats steamed j
ahead, all the way training their Gatling
guns upon the banks and dropping shells
wherever uniforms appeared on the 1
shore. The gunboats dispersed the in- i
surgents before San Lucis. After they |
had passed, sharpshooters from the trees !
across the river harassed the Seventeenth ,
infantry, which was marching by. fours j
along the narrow, wooded road from !
which the troops were unable to see the I
enemy. The members of one battalion !
laid on their faces in the road for a
quarter of an hour, trying to locate the
riflemen and return their fire. Two
Americans were wounded.
The road wound close to the stream
and was thickly settled. It was a pic
turesque march. Many groups of hun
dreds of natives were clustered under
the trees on the opposite banks, display
ing white shirts, towels, or anything on .
white poles. Some shouted welcomes to j
the American soldiers, but most of them
maintained a sullen silence. An old man
in a carriage met the troops two miles
outside of town. He said:
T have lived in England and I have
told the people that the Americans are
like the English and that they need not
be afraid."
Captain Grant, irt command of the gun
boat, landed before troops arrived and
met with a "Porto Rico welcome." The
natives, who had assembled on the shore,
crowded about the Americans with full
some expressions of friendship, appa
rently half afraid that they would be
massacred. Captain Grant quickly dis
tributed the men from the gunboat La
Guna de Bay to guard the town, and the
natives sent a messenger to tell the peo
ple who had taken refuge in the swamps
to return. Hundreds of the natives there
upon returned timidly, a man with an
improvised flag of truce flying from a
bamboo pole heading the party. A Capu
cian priest, who had not been imprisoned,
said it was useless to try to convince the
natives that the Americans had not come
to oppress them, as they believed their
leaders, who had strongly impressed this
belief upon them.
Manila, May 20.-9:25 a. m—Two mili
tary and two civilian Filipino commis
sioners, appointed to co-operate with
three citizens of Manila in negotiating
terms of peace, arrived here at 8:15 a.
m. today. They have submitted no new
proposition, but want an armistice pend
ing the sttsision of the Filipino congress.
Major General Otis lias refused to enter
tain the proposition.
EMPLOYMENT.
'MEN, OTTR ILLUSTRATED CATA
logue explains how we teach the barber
trade in eight weeks, intiiled free. Mol
er Barber College, Minneapolis, Minn."
WANTD—TWO HARNESS MAKERS,
at Butte Harness company, 221-223
East Park.
SITUATION WANTED—BY AN Ex
perienced dressmaker, best of reference.
Address 427 South Arizona.
WANTED—YOUNG MAN WITH PUSH
and energy, to take active interest in
well established, paying dry goods busi
ness; $2,000 to $4,000 required. Address
Business, Inte # r Mountain office.
WANTED—POSITION AS A HOUSE
keeper, by experienced, steady woman,
for gentleman with motherless child or
infant. References given and required.
A. B. C., care Inter Mountain.
BOYS WANTED—GET US TWENTY
flve subscribers at 20 cents per year,
and we will send you, free, a fine silver
filled stemwinder watch, guaranteed
three years. Story Teller Magazine,
231 Broadway, New York.
WANTED—CHRISTIAN MAN OR Wo
man to qualify for position trust. Salary
$900. Enclose reference and self-ad
drssed envelope to Secretary, care In
ter Mountain.
WANTED—TWO GOOD HONEST CAN
vassers; ones willing to hustle. Good
money to right partieB. Call 417 South
Arizona street.
MONTANA EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
will furnish help of all kinds. Room 8
16 W. Broadway. Butte.
COMPETENT DRESSMAKER, TO SEW
In families, $1.50 per day. Suits at
home, $5.00 up. Address P. O. Box 1224,
Butte.
BUSINESS CHANCES.
FC-R SALE — 18-ROOM LODGING
house, steam heat and modern. $300.
Reid & Kennedy, 3 W. Broadway.
FOR SALE—PROPERTY IN ALL.
parts of the city. Houses on install
ments. Reid & Kennedy, 8 West Broad
way.
FOR SALE—HOTEL, RESTAURANT,
confectionery store and all kinds of
lodging houses. Reid & Kennedy, 3 W.
Broadway.
$1,350 BUYS A 4-ROOM HOUSE AND 2
room house on one lot. Colorado street.
A bargain. Sec this. $700 buys'choice
lot E.Mercury street. McMillan & Floyd,
47 E. Broadway.
WHAT HO I WANT?
Read the Wants below and you may find it. If you
don't, put in an advertisement of your wants and we
will guarantee quick returns.
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FOR SALE—MODERN BRTCK COT
tage, Colorado street, $1,800'; Modern
'brick cottage, Main street, $1.500; Frame
cottage on South side, $750; Modern
brick cottage on West Galena, $1,500;
Three cottages and two'lots South side
$2.000; Two choice lots on the West side,
$1,300; six brick tenements, Montana
street, $6,750; thirty-two room brick E.
Granite street, $7,500. A few houses for
rent.
To loan: Money to loan on chattels. 23
24 Owsley block.
FOR SALE—26-ROOMED LODGING
house; steam heat, modern, up-to-date,
for $1,300. Cost $2,200 one year ago.
Case & Simpson. 26 East Broadway.
CROSBY ADDITION HAST SIDE NEAR
N. P, railroad- shops. Only $60. The
best lots ever offered for the money.
Cobban, Casey, Day Co., 33 West Gran.
ite street.
FOR SALE—A SNAP. 36-ROOM LODG
ing house, fine location and a big mon
ey maker. Only $2.000. Johnson &
Pinkston, Owsley block.
FOR SALE—THN-ROOM LODGING
house, central. Full of roomers. Price
$500. Johnson & Pinkston, Owsley bile.
FOR SALK— TH I HT KEN- BOOM LOD'G
ing house. Renting splendidly, clears
good profit and cheap at $750. Johnson
& rinkston, Owsley Block.
FOR SALE—SALOON NEAR PARK
and Main., doing a fine business. Price
very reasonable. Lease. Johnson &
Pinkston, Owsley block.
FOR SALE—LEASE AND FURNITURE
of 8-room house; 8 roomers; 18 board
ers; center of city, $850. Lynch &
Bachelor, 19 New Bee Hive building.
FOR SALE—A COMPLETE- RESTAU
rant outfit, dining room and kitchen
furniture, costing $1,000, can be bought
for $300. Everything about it first
class and nearly new. Lynch & Bachel
er, real estate and insurance, new Bee
Hive block.
FOR SALE—FURNITURE OF A 4
room house, cheap. $75. Case & Simp
son, 26 East Broadway.
FOR SALE—GOOD PAYING RESTAU
rant, in good location, for $200. Case &
Simpson, 26 East Broadway.
FOR SALE—8-ROOM BRICK WITH
good stable, West Side; less than c ost.
Price $3,200. Lynch & Bachelor, 19
New Bee Hive building.
FOR SALE—LEASE AND FURNITURE
of 12-room boarding and lodging house
North Main street; rent $50; price $850.
Lynch & Bachelor, 19 New Bee Hive
building.
FOR SALE — FIVE-ROOM BRICK
house with bath and clothes room on
50 by 100 foot nicely filled and fenced
corner lot. A nice home at a bargain.
1201 Talbot avenue or East Mercury.
ALL KINDS OF RESIDENCE AND
business properties. Lynch & Bachelor,
19 New Bee Hive building.
MERRY GO ROUND FOR SALE IN
good condition. Address T. O. New
man, corner Wyoming and Porphyry
Butte.
FURNITURE FOR SALE OF EIGHT
roomed boarding house. 317 South
Idaho, Butte.
Ü20 ACRES OF LAND 9 MILES FROM
Anaconda. First water right 50 Inches;
160 acres fenced with log house, barn,
and chicken houses. Here is a chancö
for $600. Mahoney and Smith, 209 Main
street .Anaconda.
THREE HARDWOOD BEDROOM
Suits cheap. 124 West Park.
FOR SALE — SALOON BUSINESS,
centrally located, with lease, stock and
fixtures; will net you 6 per cent per
month on the investment of $1,000.
Lynch & Bacheler, 19 New Bee Hive
building.
FOR SALE—WE HAVE A PROPERTY
for $6,500 that rents for $160 per month;
modern houses; everything in good re
pair and in a desirable location. See
Lynch & Bacheler.
NEW BRTCK BLOCK, WITH GOOD
view and plenty of light, cheap. 203
South Arizona.
MINING STOCKS.
REPUBLIC MINING STOCKS ARE
low. In 60 days all listed stocks will
show an advance that wijj give a
handsome profit on investments made
now.
Anaconda .......................$ .06%
Butte & Boston ...................06%
Dora ....... 02%
Golden Harvest ...................05
Mountain Lion ...................1.50
Ajax ..............................04
W. S. Le Roi .....................01 %
Mabel ...........................03%
Hit or Miss........................02
Ouilp ............................ .15
Summit ...........................04
Surprise ......................... .32
P. Maud...........................06%
Lone Pine...............,.........45
Crystal ...........................08
Conroy & Co., Brokers, 161 East Park
street.
FURNISHED ROOMS.
NEATLY FURNISHED FRONT ROOM
with bath. Cheap. 661 S. Main.
SHERMAN HOUSE, 107 W. QUARTS,
furnished rooms, with bath, electric
light, etc., at reasonable rates.
FOR RENT—NEWLY FURNISHED
rooms, in new brick building, corner of
Arizona and Mercury street?.: tran
sients solicited.
X. L. N. T.—COMFORTABLE SITTING
room. Prompt calls. Steam heat and
electric lights. 27 South Main. Beds
25c and 50c.
FOR RENT
FOR RENT—Desk room and storage
room. Kelly block, 77 East Park street,
basement.
SUMMER HOME FOR RENT—WITH
plenty of grounds and garden and sup
ply of wood; six rooms; $25 per montH.
J. H. Fariss & Bro., Insurance and
Rental Agents, ' Silver Bow block.
FOR RENT—THREE-ROOM LODGING
house. Inquire at this office.
FOR RENT -HOUSE CLOSE IN, WEST
Side, and furniture for sale to party
renting. Enquire J. E. Rickards Co.,
49 East Broadway.
NEWLY PAPERED MODERN HOUSE,
four large rooms. 229 East Platinum,
east of Arizona.
FURNISHED HOUSES
A SUITE OF ROOMS FOR HOUSE
keeping, can be rented single. 67 E.
Park street.
TWO NICELY FURNISHED ROOMS
for light housekeeping, for $9. 409
South Main street.
THREE ROOM FURNISHED HOUSE
for rent cheap. J. H. Moloney, 33 W.
Granite.
DRESSMAKING.
FINE DRESSMAKING, TAILOR SYS
tern, work guaranteed, prices reason
able. 23 West Granite street, Room 27,
upstairs.
MONEY TO LOAN
$1.000 TO $5.000 TO LOAN ON IM
proved city property. Two desirable
lots in Ophir addition $400 each; $150
buys lots in George Cobban's addition.
Warranty deed and abstract furnished;
perfect title guaranteed. We build
houses on monthly payments. Have
mines to lease and shafts to sink. Ad
dress the owner, George A. Cobban,
Room 10, Scott house.
MONEY TO LOAN—MONEY TO LOAN
in large or small quantities or. real es
tate security. I also have money to
loan on household furniture. Chas. L
Smith, 22 West Granite street.
MONEY TO LOAN—$100,000 TO LOAN
on real estate security. I can furnish
any amount desired, at the very lowest
rate of Interest, W. H Winters, Ows
ley block.
MILLINERY.
MILLINERY AND HAIR DRESSING
parlors; latest styles and fashions. 114
West Broadway.
SPECIALISTS
MRS. It. BROWN, 112 WEST DALY
street, Walkerville, formerly 308 South
Dakota street, cures all female com
plaints with her own medicine.
MEDIUMS.
MME. GUY, 203 S. DAKOTA STREET.
Circles every Tuesday and Friday even
ings.
miscellaneous.
CHILDREN'S HOME — A LIMITE!
number of children boarded, reasonab'«
rates, at 409 South Main street.
WANTED—A HOUSE OF FIVE TO
eight rooms. Will pay cash if suitable.
Apply room 16, 115 North Main.
FINE OAK AND MAHOGANY FURN1
ture of six rooms for sale, near librar;
J. McCracken, 49 E. Broadway.
ATTENTION MINERS—I AM TH1
only manufacturer of the paten
miners' candle stick. The most hand
and useful one made for 75o. S. Porte
machinist, 410 North Main.
EXPERT ACCOUNTANT AND COL
lector. J. Leyden, care Inter Mountain
WANTED—THE PUBLIC TO KNOA
that I am here to stay; that my offic
is open for free consultation on a
diseases. Hours: 2 to 5. 7 to 9. Pro
C. Sullivan, No. 312 West Broadvva;
Butte, Mont.; Telephone 215.
WANTED-TWO OR THREE TTNFUR
nished rooms, on West Side, within six
blocks of Main street. Address A. L.
M., Inter Mountain.
__ « _
JOHN STECH, THE PRACTICAL
boot and shoe maker, is now located at
128 South Main street. All kinds of
work neatly done.
at
EGGS FOR HATCHING, FRO
thoroughbred Buff Leghorn
splendid layers, none bette
Appiy at No. 1020 Nevad
street.
MUSIC.
E. J. PASSMORE — PROFESSOR OF
singing, organ and piano. Studio 102 E.
Granite street.
CLAIRVOYANT
SEE LILLIAN BELLMONT'S ADVER
tisement cut of hand on other pages.
The Argylc, 68 West Broadway.
MRS. HAZEL EARL, PSYCHIC AN
clairvoyant reader; past, present ar
future correctly read. This gifted lac
has no equal; she gives accurate ma
^et quotations, psychometerizes or
and gives advice on all legitimate bus
ness. A call will convince you of h<
accuracy. Spiritual circles every Su
day and Friday evenings, Room 6, E
wood block.
ASSAYERS.
A. B. ROMBAUER, SUCCESSOR TO
Carney & Hand, assayer and chemist,
103 East Broadway, opposite McDer
mott hotel, P. O. Box 114.
BRADEN & BAPTY, ASSAYERS AND
Chemists, 119 Hamilton street (Carney
& Hands' old stand); work carefuly and

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