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Daily inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1881-1901, June 07, 1899, Image 8

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053057/1899-06-07/ed-1/seq-8/

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A
erf*#
We Want
Your Attention
have just placed on the market, above the
railroad near the Gagnon mine? If so
then rustle and see that you get there
quickly for we have placed them on very
cheap; first few lots from $250 up.
$1,250 Buys New House on the
Gagnon. Easy Payments.
FOR RENT
5-room cottage, stable, etc., for the sea
son, Lynndale
no von want one of those new lots we
Do you want one or tnose new
3 office rooms, close in ..............$17.50
6-room flat, East Side .............. 35.00
6-room brick. East Side ............ 27.50
6-room frame, Anaconda Road
4-room frame. Placer street ........
3- room frame, South Washington..
4- room basement. East Side ........
4-room brick, new. East First ......
4-room frame, West Alabama ......
Real Estate
Loans
Fire Insurance
Rentals
20.00
- n
i-.ju
10.00
1° 50
on ' n
.0.00
15.00
48 E.Broadw'y
i$j.
170
!
;
!
j
1
We Have Added
to our Business
an
Optical
Depart
ment
With Mr. Dodd in
charge. He is a
graduate and a
scientific Opti
cian of great ex
perience. We
guarantee a
Perfect
Fit
in every case.
Examination and
fitting of Glasses
Free
Of Charge.
He Gets Four Years in
Penitentiary.
the
SHAD WELL'S NEW TRIAL
Set For the Twenty-Second of July
—A New Information Filed
Against Lucey.

lu department No. 2 of the district court 1
today Judge Clancy pronounced judgment j
! on Frank Murray, who was convicted last i
!0 from Rob
iin old soldier who, during the
pi
Hying thick and fast about him, but went i
down and was robbed in Butte two months \
ago while engaged in an endeavor to de- |
feat the product of a Kentucky distillery.
Murray was sentenced to four years
the penitentiary.
When the judge asked him If he had
anything to say, the young man arose and
began an address, but M. D. Kelly, his at
torney, relieved him of the job. The lat
ter reviewed the testimony adduced at the
tr.al. He spoke of the possibility of a mls
"" * " ,, " v y. "no was convicteu last !
|W eek of the theft of about $80 from Rob- j
j ert Boyd,
; late war, never flinched when bullets were
in ;
!
take on the part of Boyd In the allegation
'ÎÎ!' 11 * b ' d n £\ pi , ven ,' he P urso to the
j young man. He also thought Noonan's
j testimony against the prisoner was se
vere -
]n reply the judge said he had heard the
testimony, but as it was Murray's first nf
fense he would therefore give him only
lour >' ears in the penitentiary.
" ben the edict went forth the prisoner,
with open mouth and eyes plethoric of
! w'onder and surprise, leaned forward and
remained motionless a few seconds. Then
he gave his hat a twist, spoke to his
mother at his right and left the room with
l'a in and humiliation. His appearance
stamps hint as a hard working man.
the bailiff. Murray's father was also pres-;
ent, his face wrapped in an expression of j re
it
The demurrer in the case of the state
against Daniel Lucey, charged with the
murder of Patrick L. Regan, was called i
for hearing this morning, but the county |
attorney was prepared for it. He con- |
fessed the alleged errors in the informa- |
tion, and at once applied for and was ' be
granted leave to file a new complaint. The ! be
document was not read to the prisoner, j
The only material change from the former
one was the part alleging the manner in ]
which the crime had been accomplished. I
Ji stated that the murder had been com
mined in a way unknown to the prosecut-!
fing attorney, while the first complaint said j
it had been done with a rock in Urn hands j
in
Elmer Ensminger and Peter Normandie
pleaded not guilty to a charge of having
divested George Mudd's Big Hole river
cabin of a few- articles of value to a moun
taineer, and will be tried on the unlucky
13th. They will be given separate hear
it
of
a
°a
fc
of
94
of Lucey. The prisoner was given until
Saturday to make his plea.
Thomas Saddler pleaded not guilty to
having taken a few shots at one O'Connel
in a Centerville saloon a few weeks ago.
His ease was set for trial on the 12th. Thei
defendant's attorney was not present, and ;
Saddler transacted the business himself, j
_ j
1
|(
tlie purpose of hearing the judge j
giant him a new trial in accordance with L,
instructions from the supreme court, and
T
The case of the state against young
Boots, accused of assault in the first de
gree on Oscar Pauli, was set for trial on
the 14th. His attorney was also missing.
. looking as pale as the
was in court this morn
G. R. Shadwe
proverbial ghost
ing for tlie pur,_____ ..... ,
set a date for it. July 22 was decided upon, |,
but in fixing the date the attorney for the i
prisoner asked that It be made subject to !
a motion for a continuance, as a couple of j
their witnesses were out of town. The L
judge answered that probably seme of the I *
state's witnesses were also absent, and he
HmrVT thT'îr. , the |.
time for the trial arrived. Shadwell has
been in the county jail 17 months lacking
four days, hut looks litiie or no worse than
when he was first incarcerated. A long
period of dissipation prior to tlie day he
shot and killed Martin O'Connor began,
years ago. to yield its crop of subsequent
results, and they are still slicking to him.
Attorney Lippincott asked Judge Clancy
today for an order on the clerk of the
court for iho return of the revolver with
which George W. Nicholson shot and killed
Janies Wilson. He got it.
The county attorney has been granted 20
additional days in which to make some
proposed amendments to the bill of ex
C(%tions offered by Ihe defense in the ease
of the slate against Joseph Shafer, who
killed John Hawkins nearly two years ago.
In the suit of Ihe city against William
I TI. Patterson and others, an action in
! voicing the condemnation of some property
i the eourt appointed W. F. Cobban, Sum
I uel Mulville and John B. MifClernan to ap
j praise the value of the bon# of contention.
Ernest Hardcastle, clerk in Judge Clan
cy's court, reeeived a letter from his sol
dier brother. Will, today. The young sol- j
dier arrived at San Francisco from Manila i
a few days ago and is now in the Pre- ■
sidio. in the Golden Gate hospital. He will j
return to Butte as soon as he recovers
sufficiently to travel.
Tn Judge Lindsay's court today, George
W, Davis submitted a petition for the a 1 #
irwance of a claim for $t0.00a, which he
holds against the estate of his mother.
Thea Jane Davis, who died a few months
ago. The claim is in the nature of two
promissory rotes for $15.660 each, which
Mrs. Davis gave him several years ago.
The Interest amounts to $10,000. The First
National hank has a claim for $17^1
against the estate, and Davis asks the
eourt to allow It along with his own. The
jnatter will be heard on the 24th.
Frank Britton, administrator of the
estate of A. C. White, filed his monthly re
port today. It shows that he has collected
$1,008.55 and paid out $192.35, leaving a baJ
anre of $816.20. Of the money taken In,
considerable of It Is the result of the MU#
of goods at the store owned by White
prior to hla demise.
County Auditor Griffin drove into the
• mnnntnin« beyond the Nine Mile house
last evening end returned as far as ihe
poor farm with the 10-inonths-old child be
longing to Alma Freudien, which was be
ing cared for by an old woman there at
an expense of $10 per month to the county.
The child will be sent to the Orphans'
home at Twin Bridges tomorrow.
THE BIG MINING SUIT.
WILL NOT COME UP FOR TRIAL BE
FORE NEXT NOVEMBER.
The re-trial of the famous mining law
suit between the Boston & Montana com
pany and the Montana Ore Purchasing
company, which, when it was held the
first time in Butte, was remarkable for
the eminence of the counsel engaged and
the large number of famous mining ex
perts who testified for the contending
sides, may not take place in Helena until
late in the fall. It has been thought of
late that it would be called up this sum
1 nnr, and recently there has been a see.m
j n g probability that
i reach it at an early date.
jappeared in Judge Knowle s court Mon
^siblliTteTof UkingT''up^nnTaccom- ;
pi is lied nothing and left it with the gen- !
i ra i understanding that it might not be i
\ considered before the November term of
| count began,
tile court would
! reaen it ai an eai.j «ate. Tlie lawyers in
j appeared in Judge Knowle^s_court_ Mon
Of tha proceedings the Helena Inde- I
pendent says:
; j F Forbis of Butte, representing the j
! Boston & Montana company, was in
court when. Judge Knowles arrived from
tiie same parties. There are some other
j re as 0n s why we could not take up the
case and try it at that time. We ask that
it be set for a time not later than three
weeks from today."
"What is the other case?" asked Judge
Knowles.
i 'Tt is between the Butte & Boston and
| the Montana Ore Purchasing company,
| about a conflict between the Pennsylva
| nia and Rarus-Johnstown lodes. It might
' be finished in less time, but it would not
! be safe to count on completing it in less
j than four weeks. Your honor is well
aware of the time such cases may eon
] surne."
I "We could not possibly try it two weeks
from today," said Mr. Forbis. "1 will
not insist now upon the setting of the
j case at this time, but I should object to
j the time proposed."
"I shall not object to having the trial
in July," said Judge Knowles. "I don't
expect to have a vacation, in July; I have
been unable to hold court continuously
for some time ,P ast ' and 1 s,ha11 be here
then if desired."
"That would not suit us very well, ' iin
herposed Judge M'cHatton. "When the
case was transferred to Helena it was
understood that we should at least have
the privlcge of requesting the time when
it should be set. We do not care to as
sume that we have that right to the in
convenience of the court's business, or
™un »uru ......... ......Hum
Missoula and took up the consideration ,
of the calendar. Mr. Forbis began with "
a statement that Thomas Patterson of
Denver had been engaged as counsel in i to
the case, and that ho would not be ready !
for the trial before July. |
tho M o n tan a k O re" Phasing comUS
will feel now about the setting of the, 01
case," Mr. Forbis added. j
"I had thought of setting it for the last j
°a J T U 'J ° r TC he fi q St ° f AUgUSt ' interrUPt "
fc "We ask that k' be set for two weeks '
from today," suggested Judge John J.
McHatton of Butte, who appeared for ;
the Montana Ore Purchasing company, i
"We do object to a later setting, espe- du
daily tho latter part of July or the first i
of August. We have a ease set for the I
94 th of July at present. It is between
2
. .
the very peat inconvenience of the bust
; ness °* P*e other pat ties. But it would
j be very inconvenient for us to have it in
j July. There are matters in connection
1 with other counsel; they might not be
able to be here."
"1 .«should not like to set it for two
weeks from today," said Judge Knowles,
dubiously.
"Say three weeks from today." sug
|( geste d Judge Mc'Hatton, persuasively.
j Patterson will be engaged all
L, Mr- Patterson will dp engageu ail
June, interposed
"Uo Vicio Inc
,
"Mr.
Mr. Forbis.
|, He ba * come into the case and he
i . eft Butte,
! ' Wou ^ y ? Ur J'T7 P"V
j fernher ' " kt ? JuC ! ge McHatton
L " e can 1 try ,l ,n August > said Mr. j
I * .
P° tlemW agre6? aske<3
|. "Under the circumstances-" Mr. For
bis began.
"We would rather let it go until No
vember if we can't begin in three weeks,"
Judge Mc'Hatton added.
"'There was some talk that either Judge
Hawley or Judge Beatty would be here
and that the ease would bo set for June
20," said Judge Knowles. 'Tlie last in
formation 1 had was that they had other
engagements. It looks as if we would
have to take care of the business our
selves. Let the case go over until No
vember, if there is no objection."
THE COPPER MARKET.
j
i

j
Engineering and Mining Journal: The
copper market is very quiet. There Is a
somewhat better demand for export, but
consumers here remain apathetic. There
lias been no marked pressure to sell, and
It is expected that the requirements for
export will again assume larger propor
tions. Prices here have changed but lit
tle, and lake is quoted at 18e, electro
lytic in cakes, wirebars and ingots at
17c, cathodes 16%c, and casting 16%e.
The London market, which closed last
week at £77, opened at £7G 15s, reacted to
£76 12s 6d and closed at £75 12s 6d for
spot and £75 2s 6d for three months. It
is cabled us tha.t tha copper statistics
have increased 3,000 tons. Refined and
manufactured sorts we quote; English
tough, £79®£79 10s; best selected, £79 10s®
£80 10s; strong sheets, £85 10s; India
sheets, £84; yellow metal, 7d.
We Are Overstocked
And will sell our entire stork of fine
Surreys, Traps, Buggies, Road Wagons,
Delivery Wagons, Carts, Etc., at greatly
educed prices for the next 30 <L$ys.
-3 1 t 1 ■
tan dard ~Carriage~Works
237* 8. Main 8t. ( Butt«
Goods Valued at $1,000 Stolen
From I. A. Heilbronner.
IT WAS SOME DAYS AGO
And the Matter Was Kept Quiet
Order to Assist the Police in
Their Investigation.
in
jjoqo
that socrecy would make it easier for the
officers to locate the burglars, the matter
was kept very quiet until this morning,
when the story leaked out.
The I. A. Heilbronner Cigar company's
store room was burglarized on the even
in C 0 f May 25, and cigars valued at about
were taken away. With the idea
The burglars entered the rear door of the
room occupied by the Heilbronner Print
Ing company's plant, breaking the glass In
the door and unbolting the fastening. This
room connects with a vacant room which
connects wttn a vacant room which
, , 1irp „ tlv hnh .„. .. , ,,
" ! J , ! Storeroom in whlch
tho ciga ' stock is kept. The burglars got
to the cigars by boring through the wood
en partition between these two rooms and
sawing out an opening about a foot square,
7«"* thr - gh inch boards on both sides
01 tho partition. Then they helped thorn
selves to 11,000 cigars, all they could reach
through the opening. This number of ci
gar ® WOU,d weigh about 350 pounds, and
1,10 stolen .stuff was probably carried out
f f y a , n<1 hauled away.
° n the night of the burglary many ol the
,wllce officers, and especially those doing
du ty near the corner of Park and Main
streets, were for an hour or so kept busy
roun « in & U P a crowd of vagrants, who
were escorted to tho boundaries of the city
and told to depart. This occurred between
2 and 3 o'clock in the morning, and the
police are of the opinion that the burglary
was committed about this time. But for
BROBECK
Hungry people, tired people, particu
lar people, all the people, know that
Brobeck is selling the BEST GROCER
IES FOR THE LEAST MONEY.
j
Thursday, Friday and Sat
urday, June 8, 9 and io
"SEETA" CEYLON TEA is the best ....
i lb. 60c, y 2 lb. 30c, *4 lb. 15c
TECHLA MOCHA AND JAVA, fine
flavor and aroma .......................
Per pound 25c
DICKERSON'S PURE VERMONT
MAPLE SYRUP ......................
Per gallon $1.25
KUNEIR'S SAUER KRAUT is O. K.....
3-lb. can 20c
BEARDSLEY'S SHREDDED CODFISH
Per can 10c
DILL PICKLES, best in the city ........
Per quart 15c
IMPORTED SALAMI SAUSAGE, worth
30 cents per pound ......................
At Brobeck's, 20c
STRICTLY FRESH MONTANA EGGS,
per dozen 20 cents ......................
_ a dozen 35c
135 W. Broadway
Tel. SE9, Prompt Delivery.
life
FOR T H f
MASSES
fTI
HISTORY OF A TRUNK
Back from the Philippines as good as new, ready for a trip to the Klondike. Not an ordinary trunk,
but one of qur specially made trunks that stand the rough usage of a sea voyage or the frightful
thumping of the baggage master. We have 90 of the same kind to sell you, to make room for a
carload due to arrive. Small, medium and large ones. All decidedly strong ones. See our trunks
before you travel. Price our trunks before you buy.
$2.50 Is a Very Interesting Trunk Price
Thai we make this week for a medium
size embossed, zinc covered Trunk, and
—————— 1 ■ we have others at equally modest figures.
VALISES AND HAND BAGS, REALLY NICE ONES, AT REASONABLE PRICES.
A SMASH IN BED ROOM SUIT PRICES
Fourteen Bedroom Suits marked down to zero. In fact, so low that there is not the slightest ground
for the suspicion that we make a profit on them. The profit is yours if you buy the Suits this week.
Here are the figures to close out the line.
Three suits birch, niahoganized, bright,
smooth finish, 20x24 bevel plate mirror,
value $18; to close, price ..................
$15.00
Five suits Imitation mahogany finish;
bureau has 24x30 bevel plate mirror
shape, base nicely carved, value $25; to
close, our price ...........................
$ 20.00
Four suits very stylish, full swell front,
hardwood antique finish, well carved
dresser, has large bevel plate mirror,
value 30; to close out .....................
$23.00
Two suits genuine mahogany finish,
latest 8well front, with large French pat
tern plate mirror, elegantly carved,
value $32; to close out, price ............
$27.00
fim
ARPET
<?€>
mm.
2$
this necessary absence of the officers it
would have been almost impossible for the
burglars to have successfully gotten away
with thejobjfis this particular section of
the city is orchnarily patrolled very closely.
The cigars taken were of the "La Me
linda" brand, the most expensive grade
carried by the concern, and each cigar is
stamped with the name, "La Melinda,"
nnd as a list of those handling the cigars
has been furnished tho officers in the var
ious towns of the state, it will probably
bo an easy matter to locate the stolen prop
erty and probably the thieves. A reward
of $50 lias been offered for any information
leading to the apprehension of the burg
lars.
Gramling's Turkish baths, 41 N. Main.
A PLEASANT INCIDENT.
A little Incident occurred yesterday af
ternoon, the memory of which some men I
wil' cherish for a long lime to come. Mar- I
eus Daly met Messrs. Meleher and Baw- ;
den of the Western iron works in front of
the Butte hotel. Like many other men he j
sympathized with them in tlie great busi
ness disaster which they had encountered
and he told them so, and asked them if
they intended to rebuild their plant. i
"We do not know just exactly what we '
will do, Mr. Daly," replied Mr. Meleher.
"All we had, and more, was represented in
the property destroyed, and it is a ques
tion of money with us. Of course we will ,
lebuild if we can raise the money." i
"Don't let that trouble you, boys," re- i
plied the copper magnate. "Just go ahead .
and rebuild and 1 will advance the j
money," and he accompanied them to Ihe ,
bank and made the necessary arrange- j
ments.
So the Western Tron works will be re
built. the matter having been arranged in
the twinkling of an eye. And the men
who suffered the reverse are probably as
much pleased over the turn affairs have
taken as they were grieved over the dis
aster of yesterday.
THE CHARGE SUSTAINED.
Mrs Mary Curtis was tried by a jury
in* Justice 'Nichols' court today on a
charge of malicious mischief, found
guiltv and given 30 days in the county
jail. Saturday evening she was released
from custody after having served a short
term for disturbance and immediately
took the war path. Proceeding to 619
Utah avenue she smashed out the front
windows of the house and Mrs. Hattie
Pennington, who resides there, nad her
arrested. On the witness stand she said
the allegations against her were as false
as the bottom of a Hood River straw
berry box. but the jury thought her story
savored of the quintessence of fish and
sent her up. j
Suits and Pants sponged
rnkJOtu and leaned. C. F. Fisher,
tailor shop No. 3 W. Galena. Prices easy.
ROCK DRILLING CONTEST.
All teams desiring to enter in a grand
rock drilling contest to be held at Short
Line Park on July 2d are requested to
send me their address. Liberal purse and
prizes guaranteed. Conditions of con
test, judges and timekeepers to be select
ed by participants. For further particu
lars address or call on
CHAS. LIEBENSTEIN, Manager,
Room 528 Hennessy Building.
The satisfaction given by tho Butte
Optical Co.'s glasses is evidenced by ihe
continued patronage of the people who
appreciate honest treatment and honest
prices. The Butte Optical Co. is now sub
stantially located at rooms 7 and 8, Ows
ley block. *
Finest crown bridge work. Dr. Wix.
TWENTY MILES
Of large pipe in the streets of Butte and
forty miles in house connections. Ten
years' service and every piece perfect is
the best recommendation for our sewer
pipe.
BUTTE SEWER PIPE & TILE CO.
SWITCHES, SWITCHES.
A great reduction in switches for the
next ten days at Mrs. A. Brithright's, 40
W. Granite.
Finest crown bridge work. Dr. Wix. •
"PÄOFKSSIONAl."
A. C. STOOD ART, M. D.
SPECIALIST, 28 W. Breadway, Butte
opposite Miner Office. Dr Stoddard haä
resumed special practice after three years*
visit to the hospitals of Europe for the
purpose of acquiring the latest methods
of treating diseases in his general offico
practice.
Office 26 W. Broadway, Columbia block.
Office hours: 10 to 1. 3 to 5. 7 to 8.
Finest crown bridge work. Dr. Wix. *
Rent
Butte.
a Pasteur Family Filter. 238
I
I
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j
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'
,
i
i
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j
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j
j
Finest crown bridge work. Dr. Wix. •
Two Sides to
Every Purchase
Your Side and
Our Side
We are not looking for the best of
it--we are looking for your perma
nent trade. Little profits makes
lots of sales and plenty of pleased
customers.
"MONEY BACK FLOUR," guar
anteed equal to any on tlie mar
ket except Quaker or Pillsbury's
$1.00 sack
*•95 pe** 100
QUAKER FLOUR .................
$1.25 sack
2.45 per 100
STRICTLY FRESH EGGS ........
20c dozen
HOOD RIVER STRAWBERRIES
25c box
SEPARATOR CREAM,
FINEST
fresh every day
LUNCH TONGUE
FANCY SALMON
20c pint
25c can
2 cans 25c
COTTAGE HAM, no bone, no fat,
no waste, 3-pound pieces—not
cooked ............
i2^c pound
FINEST SUGAR CURED HAMS
AND BACON
9%c pound
FINE SUGAR CORN ..............
3 cans 25c
Dozen cans 95c
EXTRA FANCY CORN ...........
2 cans 25c
Dozen cans $1.40
Lutey Bros
CASH GROCERY
47—W. Park St.—47
Telephone 6S.
Prompt Delivery. Mail Or
ders Solicited.

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