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Daily inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1881-1901, July 07, 1899, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053057/1899-07-07/ed-1/seq-4/

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îGet the Best |
fWe Have it. |
I ABBEY & 1MBRIE £
I Fishing Tacklef
Rods from ............. ?5c each lip Æ
4' Reels from ..............Z5c each up 9
yl Lines from...............5c each ups
^ Flies from ...........25c per doz up
f SPAULDIN G'S BASE BALL*
GOODS are the best. We have if
everything you need in this line. ^
(calkins' ä j
I i
$ 209 Main St., Butta Mont ?
it* fit
fa*
*4
xs,

Gsls Stoves
For Sale or Rent.
Dirt, Smoke cr Ashes to Bothe
INU with.
BUTTE GAS LIGHT AND
COKE GO.
48 East Broadway
Hi-A-IDIES
We wish to call your attention to our
zilk line of High-Class Novelties.
A NEW DEPARTMENT
In Butte, where we make to order, ai
moderate prices, many articles of Silk
wear. Silk Morning and Evening Gowns,
Silk Dressing Sacques, Silk Matinees,
Negligees, Silk Wrappers, Waists, Skirts,
Muslin and S Ik Underwear and Hosiery.
Rooms 47 48. Owsley Block, Butte.
Mont.
TElKBERfi BROS. X EPSTEIN
WE BUY
Sell, Repair, Store. Pack and Ship, Ren*,
or Exchange Furniture with you.
Eutte Exch'g. Furniture Co.
3. CHAUVIN. Agent.
42 W. Broadway,Butte
The Horn Kong Calef
J And Oyster Parlors, t
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The First Class Restaurant of>
the City. BEST OF MEALS» j
£ i
15 Cents anti upward. £ ;
Private Rooms for Ladle s* '
♦ i
^ Also Dealers in ^ j
I Chinese and Japanese!
I Fancy Goods j
4 liest Teas, Fine Silks, Chinaware Eta - j
« S7 W. Park St., Butte. $
f HUM FAY, Prop, and Mgrf
Good Jersey
Milch Cows
For Sale
Driving Horses for Sale.
Inquire
BircMal# M Farm
29 W. Broadway.
OREGonrs LOSS
Fifty Nine of Her Soldiers
Died During the War.
DISEASE AND BULLETS
Of This Number Fourty Four Suc
cumbed to the Ravages of Sickness
While Fifteen Met Death at the
Hands of the Filipinos.
Portland, Ore., July 7.—According to
reports received at the adjutant general's
office 59 members of the Second Oregon
volunteers have been killed in battle or
died of disease since the regiment left
this city on May 16, 1S98. The following
is a list of the dead, together with the
cause of death:
Elias Hutchinson, Company M, peri
tontis.
Rufus K. Holbrook, Company C, ty
phoid.
Edgar J. Johnson. Company D, fever.
Edward C. Young. Company A, fever.
Harry M. Wheeler, Company D, small
pox.
William Fields, Company L, typhoid.
Herbert H. Applegate, Company B, ty
phoid.
Asa McCune, Company A. pneumonia.
R i e h ardFP ear y, CsmpanyA, typ ho id.
George W. Stornier, Company B, ty
j phoid.
E'llot W. Ordway, Company H, typhoid.
C. F. Minier, Company M. malarial fe
| ver.
! Charles H. Ruhl, Company H, menin
gitis.
! Charles Meade, Company C, measles,
j Harry Aipin, Company F, asthma.
! C. P. Oliver, Company H.--
Frank F. Rofena. Company G, asthma.
J. J. Reid, Company M, malarial fever.
Charles N. Horn, Company C, dysen
tery.
Ernest G. Segur. Company F, pleuro
pneumonia.
Charles F. McKinnon, Company F,
small pox.
Clyde Perkins, Company K, small pox.
Charles F. Kent. Company C, measles.
Otis Drew, Company C. typhoid.
Pearl O. Doty, Company C. small pox.
Ormond Fletcher, Company M, rheu
matism.
Fred J. Norton, Company F, dysentery.
Frank M. Hibbs, Company A, dysen
tery.
Harry G. Hibbard, Company K, ty
phoid.
Lewis 1 A. Miller, Company A, typhoid.
John Fenton, Company B, hemorrhage.
Lee K. Morse, Company L, accident.
Wistar Hawthorne, Company C, heart
failure.
Michael P. Crowley, Company D, -
F. W. Hampton, Company H, battle.
H. O. O'Flaherty, Company L, fever.
James Page, Company D. battle.
H. P. Adams, Company B, battle.
William M. Cook, Company D, battle.
Charles H. Herbert, Company I., battle.
Guy Millard, Company L. battle.
L. V. Strawderman, Company I,, battle.
Hayes B. Taylor, Company L, battle.
C. W. Hubbard, Company K, fever.
Bert J. Clark, Company A, battle.
Henry Payne, Company M, battle.
Robert Hoffman, Company M, battle.
Joe L. Berry, Company M. battle.
George E. Ichhaimer, Company G, bat
tle.
John H. Spierings. Company H. fever.
Jay F. Taylor, Company B, peritonitis.
Bert B. Chandl-.r, Company C, erysipe
las.
Wm. Mcllval- Company H. battle.
Lyman Kelsay, Company D. tonsilitis.
Charles U. Bell, Company M, pneu
monia.
W. H. Roberts, Company H. pneu
monia
James W. Powers, Company B, measles.
Ralph A. Odell, Company A. dysentery.
James Harrington. Company G, battle.
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Investigating Insurance.
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New York, July 7.—John A. McCall gave j
a dinner last night at the Metropolitan I
j tlUb t0 the Russian insurance commis
i sioners, Privy Councillor von Knobel and !
; State Councillor Baron Marshal von Bie- ^
' berstein ' " ho are here investigating the
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life insurance companies. The Prussian
representatives have been here for sev
eral months, and have made a very ex
haustive examination, the result of which I
is not made known, as the report must be
passed upon by the Prussian minister of
the interior.
Letters of regret were read from Presi
dent McKinley and Secretary of State
Hay. In his letter President McKinley
said: ' It affords me much pleasure to
send greetings and congratulations to
the assembled guests and to rejoice with
the citizens of both the United States and
Germany upon the sincere friendship
which exists between these two coun
tries, which I believe will not only con
tinue, but be constantly increased and
strengthened."
Held Out For a Year.
Manila, July 7. 7 a. m.—The Spanish
commissioners who went to Tarlac for a
conference with Aguinaldo regarding the
surrender of the Spanish prisoners in the
hands of the Filipinos, returned here last
night. Chairman Del Rio of the commis
sion, said the release of all the prisoners
had been arranged for. The commission
ers, with i.he remnant of the Spanish gar
rison of Baler, on the east coast of Lu
zon, and a number of civilian prisoners,
were escorted by Filipino soldiers from
Tarlac to the American outposts at San
RAMONA
Fernando and came to Manila by the
night train.'
The heroes of the long defense of Baler,
where the Spaniards resisted the insurg
ent siege of more than a year's duration,
formed a picturesque band. Lieutenant
Martin, the only surviving officer,
marched them through the streets. There
are only 22 and most of them are mere
boys In faded cotton uniforms and red
shirts. They are barefooted. A crowd of
Spanish men and women embraced them,
weeping and shouting their praises.
They tell a remarkable story. It ap
pears that the captain several times pro
posed to surrender, but the soldiers re
fused. Finally, some months ago, he tried
to raise a white flag. Thereupon Lieuten
ant Martin killed him with his own
sword. Their food supply gave out en
tirely a week ago and they surrendered
to the Filipinos with all the honors of
war. They were allowed to *keep*their
arms, and they say they marched from
Baler with Filipino escorts and carrying
guns through several Insurgent campa
everywhere being cheered and feted.
A New Steel Company.
St. Louis, Mo., July 7.—Articles of In
corporation have been filed here by; the
Scullin-Gallagher Iron & Steel company.
It is the intention of the incorporators to
erect the largest and most complete steel
plant in the west. The capital stock of
the company is $500,000, but it Is said that
as soon as arrangements are perfected
the stock will be increased to $5,000.000.
A tract of 54 acres has been purchased at
Clifton Heights, at a cost of $100.000. and
the erection of a mammoth plant will be
gin as soon as the details can be arranged.
Thomas M. Gallagher, one of the incor
porators, is a practical steel man and
owns several patents that will be used
by the company. Over 800 men will be
employed at the start, but It is expected
that the force will eventually be much
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larger. The company will do a general |
iron and steel business, but will make a
specialty of railroad work and steel east
ings.
Tbe Canal Commission.
Washington. July 7.—The isthmian
canal commission, the successor of the
Nicaraguan canal commission, are con
sidering the details of the work before
the various commissions, the personnel of
which was announced about a week ago.
Lieutenant Sydney A. Staunton of Ad
miral Dewey's flagship, was chosen sec- j
retary of the commission. The Panama
section of the commission will probably
visit Paris and arrangements are mak
ing to that end. The work of the old com- ;
mission under the previous appropriation ;
is being rapidly wound up, owing to the
i decision of the treasury department that
; the old appropriation does not hold over
i except in the case of contracts already
I entered into. The commission is hurry
j ing to make up its field plans, and it is
j thought that the majority of the commis
Î sion will sail for the isthmus by the end
of July.
The Tax on Gas.
Washington, July 7.—Acting Commis
sioner Williams of the internal revenue
bureau, has decided that natural or ar
tificial gas companies are subject to the
gross receipt tax under the war reve
nue act, and that in the case of artificial
gas the returns made by the company
should include sales of tar, ammonia,
coke, etc. It is held, however, that the
words "pipe line" in the act do not refer
to gas mains and pipes through which
gas is distributed directly to the consum
er, but to the system of transporting oil
or other products from place to place
through pipes instead of tanks, barrels,
etc., transported by rail or other con
venience.
Stamp Must Be Affixed.
Washington, July 7.—The acting com
missioner of internal revenue has reaf
firmed the decision of his office to the
effect that the revenue stamp required to
be affixed to parlor or sleeping car tiek
i ets may be affixed to berth or seat checks
j when tickets are not purchased by the
I passenger prior to entering the car.
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Helen Gould's Gift.
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Chicago, July 7.—A special to the Tri
bune from Madison, Wis., says: Ames
F. Wilder, editor of the Slate Journal,
has received a check for $250 from Helen
Gould, to be used in the New Richmond
relief fund.
CRYSTAL SPRINGS.
Crystal Springs is the best pleasure re
sort in the northwest. There is a newly,
constructed hotel, with pleasant parlors
,g rooms. Excellent lunches are i
and dining rooms
served at all hours. Plunge baths sup
plied by the only hot water art'isian
wells in the state. Private parties given
special attention if they will notify the
management in advance. Only five miles
from Butte. *
SPECIAL RATES TO DEER LODGE
AND RETURN.
Commencing Sunday, July 2d, and con
tinuing throughout the summer months,
round trip tickets will he sold at $1.00 to
Deer Lodge and return, good going on
train leaving the Montana Union depot
at 10:30 a. m., reaching Butte on the re
turn trip at 10:30 p. m.
SUNDAY EXCURSIONS—NORTHERN
PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.
Commencing Sunday, July 2d, a special
excursion train will leave the Northern
Pacific local depot, opposite Garrison ho
tel, at 9 a. nr., running through to Twin
Bridges. Round trip tickets will be sold
to the ollowing points:
Pipestone and return ................$1 00
Whitehall and return................ 1 25
Twin Bridges and return ............ 1 59
GOLD HUNTERS
Return From the Klondike
and Copper River.
THEFORMERSUCCESSFUL
While Those * rom the Latter District
Were Without Money and in a
Pitiable Condition—Four Men Were
Drowned in the Rapids.
Seattle, Wash., July 6.—The two ex
trema results of the search for gold in
Alaska were presented in strong contrast
today when the steamer City of Topeka
arrived from the north. Miners from
Dawson walked down the gang plank
trembling under the weight of the gold
dust they carried. Miners from Copper
river followed, staggering from physical
weakness a.nd disease contracted In the
inhospitable north. The Klondikers wore
new suits. Those from the Copper river
were still in the blanket clothes they wore
when they left civilization, and nearly
every one had a roll of blankets under his
arm. One xioor Copper river miner from
New York landed without a cent. A
Klondike,-, hearing of his plight, pur
against Urn rocks and it was broken into
Pieces,
swim,
Tho Copper river passengers numbered
14 - The >' s ' a .V the government relief party
went byCaptain Abercrombie^into the in
phased for him a ticket across the conti
nent witli a sleeping coupon and fitted
him out with now clothes.
The Topeka also brought details of the
drowning of four men at Five Finger
rapids. They were:
L. GREEN, Seattle.
H. MOHLIN, Whidby Island, Wash.
H. TING-LEY, Victoria, B. C.
WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Whidby Island,
Wasii.
They were going to Dawson on a scow.
When they reached the rapid3 they be
came confused and lost control of the
scow. The strong current carried it
terior did a great deal of good and doubt
less saved many lives.
Abercrombie is now some distance up
the Copper river valley working on the
mail road to tlie Yukon.
Purser R. C. Jones says that the Klon
dikers on the Topeka placed in his care
about $200,000 in gold dust. J. T. Kenyon,
V. W. Heywood and Judge Ostrander,
who were perhaps the richest men on
board, had about 400 pounds of dust be
tween them.
Skagway, Alaska. July 6.—Fully 1,000
American miners in Atlin, who pur
chased provincial mining licenses from
the British Columbia officials, which per
mitted them to prospect and develop gold
bearing properties and which licenses by
subsequent legislation were cancelled and
the holders deprived of all existing prop
erty ownership or developing privileges,
are banding together and collecting
necessary proofs to warrant the state de
partment prosecuting claims for dam
ages. The aggregate demand will exceed
$'5,000,000. The miners think their claims
for damages have far more merit than
did those of the British Columbia seal
ers Ex-Congressman Colonel James
Hamilton Lewis of Seattle will be re
tained by the miners, it is stated.
Judge Grosscup Better
Chicago, July 7.—Reports from Ashland,
O.. state that the condition of Federal
Judge Grosscup is considerably improved.
The jurist is no longer confined to his
bed and every indication is that he is on
a fair way to complete recovery.
!
$20 sets of teeth $10. Dr. Wix.
A GREAT INVESTMENT.
, ...
avoid trouble and guide you to success.
i Miss Perry is no "fake." She is really a
Have your fortune told by Miss Perry,
the greatest phophetess in the world,
truthful in lier predictions, reliable in
her advice. No matter what troubles
you have with yourself or others, she will
guide you. Thousands of people have
traveled thousands of miles to consult
this great prophetess on all affairs of
life, and have become very wealthy and
happy by following her advice. You
should not fail to see this gifted lady.
Site reads your hand like a book, tells
the planet you were born under, how to
wonder, and surprises the people with
her great talents. She foretold the great
rush to Alaska mines before their dis
covery, also the war between the United
States and Spain over Cuba. Room 3,
Thornton block, 51 East Broadway. *
$20 sets of teeth $10. Dr. Wix. •
THE KING OF JEWELS.
The largest diamond in the world is the
Braganza, being part of the Portugese
jewels. It weighs 1.8S0 carats. Even as
this jewel excels all others in clearness,
weight ami btilliancy, so does perfect
train in the world—eclipse all its rivals
in construction, beauty of finish, and the
superiority of the service and comforts it
affords Its patrons. This splendid train
runs daily between St. Paul, Minneapolis,
Milwaukee and Chicago.
notice to wood contractors.
Notice is hereby given that the board
of county commissioners of Silver Bow
county, Invites sealed proposals for three
hundred (300) cords of dry pine cordwood,
the same to be delivered and racked in
the jail yard of said county, on or before
September 1st, 1899.
All bids must be filed with the County
Clerk on or before July 10th, 1899, at 10
o'clock, a. m., and marked "Bid for
wood."
The board reserves the risht to reject
any and all bids; all bids must be accom
panied by cash or certified check to the
amount of One Hundred Dollars $100.00)
J. E. MORAN,
County Clerk.
THE MOST DIRECT AND SURE METHOD
Of getting the desired returns In small advertisements is through the WANT
COLUJTNS. The thousands of articles advertised here indicates the thousands
of readers who are scanning the columns every day. See rates below.
WANT ADVS
9 Oeati Per Word for Fint Issue
1 Cent Per Word After First Issue
81.00 Per Lino Pe* Month.
PERSONAL.
"MAKE MONEY SAFE, SURE! $50 OR
$100 will insure monthly income. Send
for explanation. Co-Operative Invest
ment Co. Box 252, Sioux City, la.
E A NEST GILL, LATE OF LIVERPOOL,
England, last heard of in Butte, Mont..
In 1895. Any news of the above will
be gratefully received by his anxious
mother. Write Mrs. Gill. 26 Thlrlmere
Road, Liverpool, England.
EMPLOYMENT.
WANTED —A FEW GOOD REAL
estate rustlers, to sell lots in one of the
best additions to Butte. Cobban, Casey
Day Co., 33 West Granite street.
WANTED—TWO GOOD RANCH MEN.
Inquire 29 West Broadway.
WANTED, BY ACCOUNTANT—ONE
or two sets of small books to keep even
ings; disengaged after 5:30 p. m. Room
26, Beresford block. West Quartz street.
LADY OR GENTLEMAN PARTNER
wanted. Small capital. Must run store.
Address "Business" Inter Mountain.
A COMPETENT AND REFINED LADY
wishes position as housekeeper or as
nurse or traveling companisp for inva
lid lady. Good references. Address box
31 Dillon, Montana.
WANTED—RESIDENT GENERAL
managers and general agents to travel,
appoint and drill agents on new publi
cations; salary and commission, per
manent employment. Give experience
and references, write quick. Dept. A..
The Fort Dearborn Pub. Co., 415 Dear
born street, Chicago, 111.
BICYCLES.
WANTED—TO TRADE FOR OR BUY
a wheel or wheels. See R 14, 23 W.
Granite street. W. W. Chapman.
The price of a bicycle displayed out
side A. J. Darch's bicycle store, 19 West
Broadway, on Saturday, July 1, is $45,
and the price will be $1 less every day it
is unsold. It is a new 1899 model. See it.
BUSINESS CHANCES.
FOR SALE—CIGAR AND CONFEC
tionary on East Side, half block from
Main street. Average sales per day
$20 per day, for $325. 26 E. Broadway,
room 2. .
FOR SALE—26 ROOMED LODGING
and boarding house, steam heat and
electric lights. Twenty-five boarders
for $1,500. 26 E. Broadway, room 2.
FOR SALE, OR TRADE FOR BUTTE
property, farms and stock ranches in
the fertile valleys of Gallatin, Jefferson
and Bitter Root. Money to loan on
real estate and chattel security. S. M.
Wade, Silver Bow block.
FOR SALE—FURNITURE OF FOUR
room modern house, West Side, close
in; a snap. S. M. Wade, Silver Bow
block.
FOR SALK—NEW AND SECOND
hand furniture business; center of
town; cheap rent; small capital; easy
terms. Johnson & Pinkston, Owsley
block.
FOR SALE—ESTABLISHED Busi
ness, capital of $10,000 required; profits
$5,000 a year. Johnson & Pinkston,
Owsley block.
FOR SALE—TWO CONFECTIONERY
stores, both cheap. Johnson & Pinkston,
Owsley block.
FOR SALE—LARGE STEAM LAUN
drv business, or will sell an interest;
favorable terms. Johnson & Pinkston,
Owsley block.
FOR SALE—CIGAR AND CONFEC
tionery store, with first-class two
stream goose neck. Rear 725 North
Main street.
FOR SALE — 25-ROOM LODGING
house; best location; one of the best
paying places in the city. Johnson &
Pinkston, Owsley block.
10-FOOT SHOW-CASE AND COUNTER
for sale, cheap. 124 West Park.
FOR SALE—A 38-ROOM LODGING
house, in splendid location; price ,$1.600;
part cash and the balance on time.
Rooms can be rented for $450 per
month. Chas L. Smith, No. 23 West
Granite street.
FOR SALE— DOUBLE CYLINDER EN
gine Hoisting Engine 10x14, No. 9
Knowles Sinker, 50 H. P. boiler, 3 and 5
inch pipe. P. Wiseman, room 1, Kings
bury block.
$1,100 BUYS A SIX-ROOM BRICK
house and large corner lot, West Side.
A snap. Houses and lots in all parts
of the city; some on monthly payments
McMillan & Floyd, 47 East Broadway
FOR SALE — 32-ROOM LODGING
house on Main street, $500. Part cash.
A snap. Hall Bros., 115 North Main.
CONFECTIONERY AND NOTION
store, including a full stock, fixtures,
etc., at a bargain. Store, 75 West Park
street.
FOR SALE—160 ACRES OF LAND
fenced; 65 acres under cultivation,
small orchard, 21 head ot cattle, farm
house and barn, one mile from post
office. Price $2,150. Smith and Ma
honey, 209 Main street, Anaconda.
MONEY TO LOAN
MONEY TO LOAN ON REAL ESTATE
and chattel security. Johnson & Pinks
ton, Owsley block.
$20,000 TO LOAN IN SUMS TO SUIT.
McMillan & Floyd, 47 East Broad way.
ASSAYER 5.
A. B. ROMBAUER. SUCCESSOR TO
Carney & Hand, essayer and chemist,
103 East Broadway, opposite McDer
mott hotel, P. O. Box 114.
BRADEN & BAPTY,
ASSAYERS
199 Hamilton St., (Carney & Hand's old
and.) Offlcehours 7 a. m., to 9 p. m.
FURNISHED ROOMS
BOARD.
The Hotels, Rooming Houses, Restau
rants and other places who are catering
to transient and traveling trade, will find
it to their benefit In dollars and dimes
to put their advertisement under the
above heading, as the Inter Mountain is
now circulated on all the railroads enter
ing Butte.
FOR RENT — TWO PLEASANTLY
furnished front rooms. 9 East Granite
street.
STRICTLY PRIVATE ROOMS FOR
transients. 205 South Arizona street,
over Try Me saloon.
BECKWITH'S EUROPEAN RESTAU
rant will furnish you a fine meal for
25 cents. 41 West Park.
FURNISHED ROOMS, TALBORT RES
idence. 501 West Galena. First-clas 3
table board.
FOR RENT—FURNISHED ROOMS,
with large alcove. 128 Owsley block.
NEATLY FURNISHED ROOMS FOR
light housekeeping. Basement Owsley
block.
NEWLY FURNISHED FRONT ROOM
834 East Galena.
BECKWITH'S EUROPEAN RESTAU
rant will furnish you a fine meal for
25 cents. 41 West Park.
AN ELEGANT FURNISHED FRONT
room, first floor. One or two gentlemen.
Nadeau Flats, 119 W. Galena.
FURNISHED ROOMS FOR HOUSE
keeping. Best In the city. 217 West
Galena.
CLEAN. SUNNY, FURNISHED
furnished rooms, $2 a week; electric
light, free baths. 127 East Park.
FURNISHED ROOMS—STEAM HEAT,
electric light, baths free. Mantle block,
16 W. Broadway, west of Clark's bank.
X. L. N. T.—COMFORTABLE SITTING
room. Prompt calls. Steam heat and
electric lights. 27 South Main. Beds
25c and F.Oc.
FOR RENT
FOR RENT—SUITE OF HOUSEKEEP
ing rooms for rent, reasonable. 101
West Granite street.
FOR RENT—TWO. THREE OR FOUR
furnished rooms. 214 Jackson street.
FOR RENT—THREE FURNISHED
rooms for housekeeping, rent $12. 936
West Granite street.
FOR RENT—A NICE OFFICE, OR
will rent for a restaurant or confection
ery store. 44 West Granite.
MEDIUMS.
MME. GUY, 203 S. DAKOTA STREET.
Circles every Tuesday and Friday even
ings.
MRS. HAZEL EARL, THE GREAT
psychic and clairvoyant reader, leaves
for Salt Lake City on July 26. If you
wish, to know something about the
future of your undertaking, either in
business lines, socially, matrimonially
or spiritually, be sure and consult her
before she leaves. Spiritual circles
every Sunday and Friday evenings.
Room 6, Elwood block.
SPECIALISTS
MRS. R. BROWN, 112 WEST DALY
street, Waikerville, formerly 308 South
Dakota street, cures all female com
plaints with her own medicine
MISCELLANEOUS.
GET YOUR WALL PAPER CLEANED.
Go to Walker's 50 West Granite street.
WANTED—3 OR 4-ROOM HOUSE. UN
furnished, or three unfurnished rooms.
Address O. K., Inter Mountain.
$5.00 REWARD FOR THE RETURN
of a bay mare branded I. S. on left
shoulder, also has a halter on. Weighs
about 1,150. Left Saturday evening.
Fred Kcrth 1048 Wyoming avenue.
WANTED—OLD IRON, BRASS, COP
per, rubber and T rails at highest cash
prices. Correct weight guaranteed.
Zeeve Junk Co., 336 South Arizona
street. P. O. Box 966, Butte.
GASOLINE LAMPS AND SUPPLIES,
238 East Park street.
JOHN N. OLSON, MUSIC TEACHER
and orchestra. 501 South Dakota
street.________
WANTED—TWO HUNDRED HORSES
to pasture on one thousand acres of the
finest pasture land In the country.
Within five miles of Butte. Charges
low. Inquire of postmaster at Wood
ville. _______
miTTE UPHOLSTERING AND STEAM
Carpet Cleaning Co. Montana and
Porphyry streets. 'Phone 119.
JOHN 5TECH. THE PRACTICAL
boot and shoe maker. Is now located at
128 South Main street. All kinds of
work neatly done.
MILLINERY.
MILLINERY AND HAIR DRESSING
parlors; latest styles and fashions. 114
West Broadway.

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