OCR Interpretation


Daily inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1881-1901, July 10, 1899, Image 4

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053057/1899-07-10/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 4

iGet the Best f
|We Have it. |
1 Fishing Tackle|
2 Rods from............. >5c each up 0
ft Reels from .............. 25c each up 4
J: Lines from ...............5c each up?
5 Flies from ........... 25c per doz up?
SPAULDING'S BASE BALL*
GOODS are the best. We havc^
everything you need in this line. ^
.CALKINS "Ä j
209 Main St., Butte Mont $
£
OUR
as,
3
Stoves
For Sale or Rent.
Stroke cr Ashes to
Bothe
OSLS
no as
BUTTE GAS LIGHT AND
COKE GO.
48 East Broadway
WE BUY
Be! 1, Repair. Store. Pack and Ship, Rent
or Exchange Furniture with you.
Butte Excb'g. Furniture Co.
J. CHAUVIN. Agent.
42 W. Broad way, Butte
'le Hong Kong CaiBi
And Oyster Parlors. ft
The First Class Restaurait, of )
the city. BEST OF MEALS^
(5 Cents anti upward. f

ft
ft
ft
^ Also Dealers in
ft Chinese and Jap;
I Fancy Goods
é Best Teas, Fine Silks, China ware Etc
ft S7 W. Fark St., Butte
< HUM FAY. Prop, and Mgr
'
j
;
ft
ft
ft
X
a
V
ft
* J
ft
HUIE POCK & CO.
Den'er iu
Chinese and Japanese
Fancy Goods, Teas, China ware and La
dies' Dress Goods. All kinds of Silks.
Ladies' and Gentlemen's Underwear
made to order.
No, 227 South Main. Butte.
Good Jersey
Milch Cows
- For Sale
Drwing Horans for Sale.
Inquire
BircMals Stool Farm
29 W. Broadway.
MONEY_MARKET
In London Has Been Topsy
Turvyish Lately.
RATES WORKING DOWN
Increase in Financial Business Shown
by Clearing House Figures—India
Will Have a Gold Standard in the
Near Future.
New York. July 10.—The Times' Lon
don financial correspondent cables: Our
money market has been a little topsy
turvyish this week. The bill brokers ;
were working the rates down below 2 j
per cent, with full belief that money j
will be cheap. It has not fallen as ex- j
pected. On the contrary, it has been j
scarce an<l dear. Instead of paying back j
all the loans due the Bank of England ,
the merket has had to renew a portion
and the bank charged o'» and for the last
two days 4 per cent for three and four
days' advances. Then the two biggest j
banks that usually hold from $2.000.000 to
$25,000,000 in bills between them have been
holding off the market. Either they
would not buy at all or they refused to
take the bills at less than 2',4 per cent.
The bankers, therefore, were thrown back
! on floating credits in the market, for
I which often 2 and sometimes 2V» and 3
I per cent has been charged. Even so. the
, Bank of England has been master of the
! position. Perhaps greater ease will come
i next week, but in any case extreme
cheapness is not possible.
} We are doing an enormous trade and a
' still more enormous financial business.
■ as the returns of the bankers' clearing
house of the past week prove. They
show an increase of £58.000 on last year's
total for the same week and at £253,423,
OOOrepresent the highest week's total ever
known. Throughout the provinces it is
just the same. The country banks found
local employment for their money and
! can spare less for London. Gold is still
! going to Scotland instead of coming
back, as it usually does at this period of
the year. The foreign banks, too, loan
more and more on London account, the
universal cry, "On the continent there is
not enough money to go around, and the
bank of Amsterdam has twice put up its
rate within three weeks. Paris has got
through the Bourse settlement without a
big smash, hut the market has been crip
pled and sulky ever since, its condition
being such that the greatest caution is
necessary. Were a Boer war to arise,
upsetting the Kaffir share market, I am
afraid to think what the consequences
might be. Both in Paris and here, per
haps, knowledge of the danger is the
greatest safeguard against war.
India is to have a gold standard. Such
is the probable decision of the committee
now sitting. This means that £20,000,000
in gold must be collected to form a basis
of the gold reserve. Money must he bor
rowed, and doubtless could be with com
parative ease, but the effect of this arti
! ficial demand for the metal must be im
portant on the rates of discount every
' where and not least here. The bank,
perhaps, is keeping a hand on the market
in anticipation, and it is quite right to do
so in any case, with the home credit de
mands so great and as affairs are shap
ing abroad.
The new Mexican conversion loan is
grunted at by many. "No catch in it
money," old stakers
Neverth
elc ss.
the prospect is
g
ood
foi'
Mexico,
and
lot had for the
in
ves
tors.
especial'
y if £
5,000,000 of the lie
\v
sto
•k is
already
sold
in New York.
That
will
give Arn
•ricai
s an interest in the
g.>\
cra
ment of
the c
luntry, perhaps,
pre
ven t
trouble
when
Diaz's reign is ovt
>r.
Our
great f<
ar is
lest the Mexic
an b
aids
should merely
represent "Diaz
s
life
an- I
nuity."
But,
meanwhile, one
big s
lock 1
dealt in
on a
half dozen mark
'ts
is
bet
ter than
a bu
ndle of small on
*s
m
isily
held by German banks and financiers,
and for this reason the conversion is
likely to be a success.
Copper is admirably manipulated, and
the ring has every appearance of being
able to keep a hold on the market for
many months. Iron is also rising and
shipyards are feverishly busy.
To Welcome Dewey.
New York, July 10.—A special lo the
World from Washington says: A letter
has bean sent to Admiral Dewey through
Secretary Long, telling him of the pro
gramme citizens of Waning ton have ar
ranged for his reception. Secretary Long
will present to Admiral Dewey, on the
east front of the capital, in the presence
of the president and citizens of Wash
ington. the sword voted to him by con
gress. The president has approved the
programme.
Our Soldiers Suffer.
Manila, July 10.—6 a. m.—It has been
raining and storming almost constantly
for two days, and the country along the
American south and bay lines ii literally
flooded. The soldiers are suffering great
discomfort. The Thirteenth infantry reg
iment at Pa nay is in the west position,
being practically surrounded by wafer.
The bridges that were used for getting
supplies have been washed away and
some of the companies are now separate. 1
by streams six fee: deep. In many cases
the men are sleeoing with tk;ce feet of
water beneath their bunks, which are
elevated on cracker boxes The company
;
'
RAMONA
cooks, when preparing (he meals, stand
knee deep in water.
Some of the roads leading to Pa nay
are simply impassable and the rice fields
on all sides are one great lake. A high
wind blew over several tents of the Sec
ond reserve hospital.
Manila bay is impossible of navigation
by either launches or ~anoes, and no
vessels are leaving the harbor. The
United States transport Centennial is
ready to sail for San Francisco with dis
charged soldiers, but the latter have to
sit around the water front all day,
drenched to the skin, waiting for a launch
to take them to the steamer. The river
Pasig and all the other streams are
swollen and city streets at all low points
are covered with water.
Tortured Dreyfus.
Paris, July 9.—M. Daniel, feovernor of
tire Isles du Salut and admihistrator of
the penal settlement on the Isle du Dia
ble, where Captain Drefus was impris
oned, lias bec'n removed and will be suc
ceeded by M. la Souean. M. Daniel was
responsible for much punishment meted
out to the prisoner in the hope of com
pelling him to declare himself 1 guilty.
Scandalous reports are in circulation
in connection with the death here yes
terday of Signor Ressman, formerly
Italian ambassador to Franck. It is al
leged that while lie was lying at the
point of death, threa personfe, including
an official of the Italian embassy, rifled
his room and took away a -quantity of
papers. The anti-Semite journals con- j
nect the story with the Dreyfus affair, j
it appears that about a fortnight ago!
Signor Ressman had an immense quan
tity of documents destroyed, declaring
that if they were left they might "harm
various people." It is also suggested that
tlie search may have been instigated by
Signor Crsrpi. the former Italian premier,
who practically dismissed Signor Ress
man from the Italian embassy in Paris
in 1895 because the diplomatist had failed
to make the French press favorable to
the Crispi government.
Waiting Their Anival.
San Francisco, July 10.—The transports
Newport and Ohio, with the Oregon vol
unteers on board, had not arrived up to
an early hour this morning, and it is
possible that they may not reach here
before Wednesday. Ail day yesterday
the water front was crowded with peo
ple, anxiously watching for the vessels.
Tt is extremely doubtful whether the
Oregon boys will be allowed to land at
all. As far as the local quartermaster's
department at present shows, both trans
ports will be ordered to Portland or As
toria as soon as they have passed quaran
tine and discharged any soldiers they
may bring that belong to other regi
ments. Whether they land or not, how
ever, every preparation has been made
to receive them, and if they are- com
pelled to remain on shipboard during
their stay here they will lie plentifully
serenaded from tugboat, launch and
Whitehall. Bands, sirens' horns and ban
ners will welcome them back to their
native land, and if they get Ashore they
will be feasted by the leaders of the Red
Cross and entertained by the citizens.
I
1
Preparing to Strike.
New York, July 10.—The coat tailors,
it is reported, are preparing to go out
on a strike for an advance In wages and
a reduction of hours of labor. They are
said to number between 10,000 and 12,000
and of these 2,500 are women and girls.
Most of these people formerly belonged
to the Brotherhood of Tailors that is af
filiated with the United Garment workers
of America, but they bolted and formed
an independent national organization.
They are not, however, affiliated with
any central body, and in the event or a
strike it is said they can not expect any
outside aid, not even from the clothing
cutters. The Brotherhood of Tailors
now number about 1,090 members, but
these have better wages and are general
ly better off than the independents. Some
time ago the independent union asked the
United Garment workers whether it
would support in the event of a strike,
and was told it would not unless 'he in
dependents were better organized. Nev
ertheless, the independents held a mass
meeting last week urging the men to go
out on a strike.
Henry White, general secretary of
the United Garment workers, says: "The
independents asked us sevetal times to
stand by them in a strike, but we told
them that they must first organize thor
oughly. Strikes on the east side have
always been costly affairs and I do not
think that we will have anything to do
with the coming strike. The men will
probably win. as th s is the busy season,
but in six weeks they will lose all the
ground that they may win, because they
always become lax and careless after a
victory."
i
i
I
;

1
1
:
i
I
j
!
Finest crown bridge work. Dr. Wix.
CRYSTAL SPRINGS.
Crystal Springs is the best pleasure re
; sort in the northwest. There is a newly
' constructed hotel, with pleasant parlors
and dining rooms. Excellent lunches are
served at all hours. Plunge baths sup
plied by the only hot water artesian
wells in the state. Private parties given
special attention if they will notify the
management in advance. Only five miles
from Butte. *
THE KING OF JEWELS.
The largest diamond in the world Is th«
Braganza, being part of the Portugese
jewels. It weighs 1.SS0 carats. Even as
this jewel excels all others in clearness,
weight and brilliancy, so does perfect
train in the world—eclipse all its rivals
in construction, beauty of finish, and the
superiority .of the service and comforts it
affords its patrons. This splendid train
runs daily between St. Paul, Minneapolis,
Milwaukee and Chicago.
$20 sets of teeth $10. Dr. Wix. •
:
1
i
I
E CANAL
Will be Made Into a Navi
gable Waterway.
PROBLEMS OF OPENING
Will Develop a Number of Questions
That Must be Settled for the People
Living: on the Banks of the Illi
nois River.
Chicago. July 10.—The Times-Herald
this morning says: "I have no doubt,"
says Chief Engineer Randolph of the san
itary d istrict, "that the ultimate end of
the cruise of the sanitary district trus
tees of the Illinois river will end in a de
mand upon congress that it be made a
navigable waterway, that eventually it
will be reconstructed to carry the largest
modern river vessels and that t'he drain
age channel of Chicago itself will be con
verted into a waterway linking Lake
Michigan with th? Mississippi and the ;
gulf of Mexico. The problems which the j
opening of the drainage canal will de- j
velop will be such that the construction '
of this waterway and the restoration of :
the Illinois and Desplaines (now drainage j
canal) to their pristine glory of first
class waterways.
The trustees of the drainage canal have
returned from their trip down, the Illi
nois river to St. Louis. They are not pre
pared to recommend the removal of the
government dams in the river, at least !
not until the water is turned into the
channel and its effect noted and they be
lieve that the law will have to be com
plied with by removing the state dams.
They are more convinced than ever
that before the Illinois will fully care
for the waters which the drainage chan
nel is to discharge into it, it must be so
improved by the government that it will, j
in reality, be once more a free s'fream. I
Eminent authorities of the society of !
western engineers who have »riven the !
progress of the drainage channel close
study, feel that the expenditure of $32,
000,000 upon that work—this amount be
ing the total expended to the date of open
ing of the channel—but marks the com
mencement of the expenditure of at least
$50,000,000 more by the general govern
ment and the state of Illinois toward
making the river and the channel a com
plete waterway, one wh-ch will not create
perpetual damage suits against the sani
tary district and which will satisfactorily
dispose of all the water ana waste em
anating from the city of Chicago and
every community upon the banks- of the
two streams of water.
Already the inland 1 cities south of
Chicago have begun making tests of the
character of the water in the Illinois riv
er for the purpose of making similar
tests after the drainage channel dis
charges into it. From the two test-s they
will determine by fall how bad the water
is made from the sewerage discharged
from the city of Chicago. This is the san
itary side of the question. There is also
i the side of determining how much over
i flow, if any, the channel will cause in the
I river, what lands will be submerged,
; what damage will be caused, wnat claims
■ there may be against the sanitary dis
1 tricts, etc. Issues such as these, now
1 that the channel is almost completed,
: have brought the residents of the valley
i and the sanitary district trustees to a
I point where mutual agreement and action
j would make thedifflcultles vastly easier
! of solution."
A CHEAT INVESTMENT.
Have your fortune told by Miss Perry,
the greatest phophetess in the world,
truthful in her predicitions, reliable in
her advice. No matter what troubles
you have with yourself or others, she will
guide you. Thousands of people have
traveled thousands of miles to consult
this groat prophetess on all affairs of
life, and have become very wealthy and
happy by following her advice. You
should not fail to see this gifted lady.
She reads your hand like a book, tells
the planet you were born under, how to
avoid trouble and guide you to success.
Miss Perry is no "fake." She Is really a
wonder, and surprises the people with
her great talents. She foretold the great
rush to Alaska mines before their dis
covery, also the war between the United
States and Spain over Cuba. Room 3,
Thornton block, 51 East Broadway. *
A WELL VENTILATED TRAIN.
One of the most essential requirements
of peaceful and health-giving slumber is
perfect ventilation. The ventilating ar
rangements in the cars of the Milwau
kee's popular Pioneer Limited—the only
perfect train in the world—are the most
satisfactory that have ever been put into
a railway train. The berths in the
sleepers arc higher, wider and longer
than those of other cars, and all condi
tions tend to insure, even to those unused
to travel, sound sleep and good rest.
Commencing Sunday, July 9, the Butte,
Anaconda & Pacific railway will make
a rate of $1.00 for the round trip Butte
to Anaconda and return. This rate will
be in effect Sundays only. Tickets will
also be sold from Butte to Mountain
View park at above rate Sundays only.
BOARD OF EQUALIZATION.
Notice is hereby given that the board
: of county commissioners of Silver Bow
1 county. Montana, will sit as a board of
equalization, beginning July 17 and con
i tinuing until August 14, 1899, when all
I persons ran appear and state their griev
ances in regard to tax assessments.
J. E. MORAN,
County Clerk.
Columbia Gardens, open free every day
of the week. Open air concert by Ross
ner's orchestra on Tuesday and Thurs
da> afternoon and evening. Free danc
ing for children Saturday afternoon from
3 to f> o'clock. Special rates and induce
ments given picnic parties. Sommers
family at Garden theater Sunday after
noon and evening. *
$20 sets of teeth $10. Dr. Wix.
THE MOST DIRECT AND SURE METHOD
Of getting the desired returns in small advertisements is through the WANT
COLUHNS. The thousands of articles advertised here indicates the thousands
of readers who are scanning the columns every day. See rates below.
WANT APVS
3 Celts Per Word for First Issue
1 Cent Per Word After First Issue
$1.00 Per Line Per Month*
PERSONAL.
"MAKE MONEY SAFE, SUREf $50 OR
$100 will insure monthly income. Send
for explanation. Co-Operative Invest
ment Co. Box 252, Sioux City, la.
, EMPLOYMENT.
WANTED —A FEW GOOD REAL
estate rustlers, to sell lots in one of the
best additions to Butte. Cobban, Casey
Day Co., 33 West Granite street.
WANTED—TWO GOOD RANCH MEN.
Inquire 29 West Broadway.
BICYCLES.
The price of a bicycle displayed out
side A. J. Darch's bicycle store, 19 West
Broadway, on Saturday, July 1, is $45,
and the price will be $1 less every day it
is unsold. It is a new 1899 model. See it.
BUSINESS CHANCES.
FOR SALE—LODGING HOUSE 1G
l'ooms, steam heat and bath finely fur
nished. Brigman, 16 West Broadway,
Butte.
FOR SALE—CIGAR AND CONFEC
tioncry. Inquire 472 E. Park street.
FOR SALE—A SNAP $3,060, CASH OR
$3,300 on monthly payments buys two
brick houses and lots at a bargain. One
brick 8 rooms with bath and electric
light, furnished. One brick 4 rooms
newly built, 142 East Center street,
Centerville.
FOR SALE—CIGAR AND CONFEC
tionary on East Side, half block from
Main street. Average sales per day
$20 per day, for $325. 26 E. Broadway,
room 2. .
FOR SALE—26 ROOMED LODGING
and boarding house, steam heat and
electric lights. Twenty-five boarders
for $1,500. 26 E. Broadway, room 2.
FOR SALE, OR TRADE FOR BUTTE
property, farms and stock ranches in
the fertile valleys of Gallatin, Jefferson
and Bitter Root. Money to loan on
real estate and chattel security. S. M.
Wade, Silver Bow block.
FOR SALE—FURNITURE OF FOUR
room modern house. West Side, close
in; a snap. S. M. Wade, Silver Bow
block.
FOR SALE—NEW AND SECOND
hand furniture business; center of
town; cheap rent; small capital: easy
■terms. Johnson & Pinkston, Owsley
block.
FOR SALE—ESTABLISHED Busi
ness, capital of $10,000 required; profits
$5,000 a year. Johnson & Pinkston,
Owsley block.
FOR SALE—TWO CONFECTIONERY
stores, both cheap. Johnson & Pinkston,
Owsley block.
FOR SALE—LARGE STEAM LAUN
dry business, or will sell an interest;
favorable terms. Johnson & Pinkston,
Owsley block.
FOR SALE—CIGAR AND CONFEC
tionery store with first-class two
stream goose neck. Rear 725 North
Main street.
FOR SALE — 25-ROOM LODGING
house; best location; one of the best
paying places in the city. Johnson &
Pinkston, Owsley block.
10-FOOT SHOW-CASE AND COUNTER
for sale, cheap. 124 West Park.
FOR SALE—A 38-ROOM LODGING
house, in splendid location; price ,$1,600;
part cash and the balance on time.
Rooms can be rented for $450 per
month. Chas L. Smith, No. 23 West
Granite street.
FOR SALE—DOUBLE CYLINDER EN
gine Hoisting Engine 10x14, No. 9
Knowles Sinker, 50 H. P. boiler, 3 and 5
inch pipe. P. Wiseman, room 1, Kings
bury block.
$1,100 BUYS A SIX-ROOM BRICK
house and large corner lot, West Side.
A snap. Houses and lots in all parts
of the city; some on monthly payments.
McMillan & Floyd, 47 East Broadway.
FOR SALE — 32-ROOM LODGING
house on Main street, $500. Part cash.
A snap. Hall Bros., 115 North Main.
FOR SALE—160 ACRES OF LAND
fenced; 65 acres under cultivation,
small orchard, 21 head ot cattle, farm
house and barn, one mile from post
office. Price $2,150. Smith and Ma
honey. 209 Main street. Anaconda.
FJ R RENT
FOUR OR FIVE ROOM FURNISHED
house on West Side for rent. Apply
Summons & Lawler, first floor Silver
Bow block.
FOR RENT-ONE FIVE-ROOM UN
furnished house. Call at Inter Mountain
office. $10.00 per month.
FOR RENT—SUITE OF HOUSEKEEP
ing rooms for rent, reasonable. 101
West Granite street.
FOR RENT—TWO, THREE OR FOUR
furnished rooms. 214 Jackson street.
FOR RENT—THREE FURNISHED
rooms for housekeeping, rent $12. 936
West Granite street.
MONEY TO LOAN
MONEY TO LOAN ON REAL ESTATE
and chattel security. Johnson & Pinks
ton, Owsley block.
$20.000 TO LOAN IN SUMS TO SUIT.
McMillan & Floyd, 47 East Broadway.
MILLINERY.
MILLINERY AND HAIR DRESSINO
parlors; latest styles and fashions. 114
West Broadway.
$
199
FURNISHED ROOMS FOR KOUSE
keeping. Best in the city. 217 West
Galena.
ASSAYER3.
B. ROMBAUER. SUCCESSOR TO
Carney & Hand, essayer and chemist.
103 East Broadway, opposite McDer
mott hotel, P. O. Box 114
BRADEN & BAPTY,
ASSAYERS
Hamilton St., (Carney & Hand's old
and.) Officehours 7 a. m„ to 9 p. m.
FURNISHED ROOMS
BOARD.
The Hotels, Rooming Houses, Restau
-ants and other places who are catering
o transient and traveling trade, will find
t to their benefit in dollars and dimes
o put their advertisement under the
above heading, as i'ne Inter Mountain i3
now circulated on all the railroads enter
ing Butte.
BECKWITH'S EUROPEAN RESTAU
rant will furnish you a fine meal for
25 cents. 41 West Park.
FURNISHED ROOMS FOR LIGHT
housekeeping corner Park and Mon
tana.
FOR RENT —TWO PLEASANTLY
furnished front rooms. 9 East Granite
street.
STRTCTLY PRIVATE ROOMS FOR
transients. 205 South Arizona street,
over Try Me saloon.
FURNISHED ROOMS, TALBORT RES
idence. 501 West Galena. First-class
table board.
AN ELEGANT FURNISHED FRONT
room, first floor. One or two gentlemen.
Nadeau Flats, 119 W. Galena.
CLEAN, SUNNY, FURNISHED
furnished rooms, $2 a week: electric
light, free baths. 127 East Park.
FURNISHED ROOMS—STEAM HEAT,
electric light, baths free. Mantle block,
16 W. Broadway, west of Clark's bank.
TAILORS
THE TAILORS BJORGUM BROS., 942
North Main St., Centerville does fine
tailoring. Work guaranteed. Give them
a call before going elsewhere.
MEDIUMS.
MME. GUY, 203 S. DAKOTA STREET.
Circles every Tuesday and Friday even«
ings.
MRS. HAZEL EARL, THE GREA 5 ?
psychic and clairvoyant reader, leaves
for Salt Lake City on July 26. If you
wish to know something about the
future of your undertaking, either in
business lines, socially, matrimonially
or spiritually, be sure and consult her
before she leaves. Spiritual circles
every Sunday and Friday evenings.
Room 6, Elwood block.
SPECIALISTS
MRS. R. BROWN. 112 WEST DALY
street, Waikerville, formerly 308 South
Dakota street, cures all female com
plaints with her own medicine
MISCELLANEOUS.
WANTED—SIb T RAIL. ZEIEVE JUNK
Co., 338 South Arizona. Butte.
E. P. WEN A AS, THE PRACTICAL
boot and shoe maker does only first
class work. A complete stock of goods
always on hand. Give him a trial and
be convinced. 320 North Main street.
GET YOUR WALL PAPER CLEANED.
Go to Walker's 50 West Granite street.
WANTED—OLD IRON, BRASS, COP
per, rubber and T rails at highest cash
prices. Correct weight guaranteed.
Zeeve Junk Co., 33G South Arizona
street. P. O. Box 966, Butte.
GASOLINE LAMPS AND SUPPLIES.
238 East Park street.
JOHN N. OLSON, MUSIC TEACHER
and orchestra. 501 South Dakota
street.
WANTED—TWO HUNDRED HORSES
to pasture on one thousand acres of the
finest pasture land in the country.
Within five miles of Butte. Chargea
low. Inquire of postmaster at Wood
ville.
BUTTE UPHOLSTERING AND STEAM
Carpet Cleaning Co. Montana and
Porphyry streets. 'Phone 119.
AN OPPORTUNITY FOR AN OUTING
IN THE BITTER ROOT VALLEY.
T/ntii further notice the Northern Pa
cific will sell round trip tickets from
Butte, Anaconda and Deer Lodge to
Hamilton and return including hotel ex
penses as follows:
On sale Wednesdays and Saturdays
round trip tickets to Hamilton including
five meals and two nights lodging at the
Ravalli Hotel at Hamilton, $10.
On sale daily, round trip tickets to
Hamilton including meals and lodging at
Ravalli Hotel six and three quarter days
$ 20 .
Tickets sold at the above rates will only
be honored on the "Copper City Limited."
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.
Estate of Charles Quinn, deceased.
Notice is hereby given by the under
signed executor of the estate of Charles
Quinn deceased, to the creditors of and all
persons having claims against the said
deceased, to exhibit them, with the neces
sary vouchers, with four months after the
first publication of thi.i notice, to the said
executor at the office a' McHatton & Cot
ter, 51S-521 Hennessy Building, Butte.
Montana, the same being the place for
the transaction of the business of said es
tate, In the CoiiHty of Silver Bow, State
of Montana.
BERNARD QUINN,
Executor of the estate of Charles Quinn
deceased.
Dated Butte, Montana, this 30th day of
June. 1899.

xml | txt