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Daily inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1881-1901, July 26, 1899, Image 5

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Delicious
FOOD and
DRINK «*>*
Our aim is to keep the best Cof
fees and sell them at a little lower
price than any other grocer asks.
Lion Coffee, package ................
IOC
Golden Rio, bulk, per pound........
I5C
Santos Blend, equal to most Mocha
and Java, per pound..............
20C
Royal Mocha and Java, per pound..
35C
Three pounds .....................
$ 1.00
If you are not pleased we will take
the goods back.
MINERS'
CASH GROCERY
A. BOOTH. CORNER MAIN
AND GALENA.
Special Sale of:
Ranges
Peninsular Blue Steel i
Ranges. 2
Regular,...................$45.00 ▼
Sale Price.............$39.50 2
No. 8-19 Peninsular Blue Steel Z
Range has six eight-inch lids, 18- X
inch bake oven, warming closet, du- Y
plex grates for coal and wood. All T
flues double walls of steel, lined $
with asbestos. Fully guaranteed.
All Velvet Carpets reduced to..$l 00
Smith Axminsters reduced to.. 1 00
$1 00 Brussels, reduced to...... 85
85c Brussels reduced to........ 70
Good Linoleum ................ 45 à
Good Oilcloth ................. 25 Y
KE8NEDÏ MNÏTDRE CO.
18-20 W, Broadway
BUTTE.
J. T. CARROLL
CARRIAGE REPOSITORY
Cor. Arizona and Platinum Sts.
Buggies, Traps,
Phaetons... In all grades.
Reduced Prices on Both Rubber
and Steel Tires.
nitchell Delivery and Farm Wagons •
Crown riowers, Thomas Rakes
ft
m
R
If you desire goods of the highest qual
ity, visit us. We can supply you with
the best Fruits and Vegetables In cans
and glass. The wants of the public have
been considered In the selecting of our
stock, and whether you are buying for
botel, restaurant or private family, your
best interest might be served by calling
•nd examining our stock and learning
our prices.
THEWHITE FRONTGROCERY
220 N. Main St. Phone 185.
TH0S. F. COURTNEY
BIG HOLE WATER
It is to Be Piped Into Butte For
All Purposes.
HE STRUCK MOUGHTON
But Not With His Fist or a Brick
First Degree Assault
Charged.
It is the intention of the Butte Water
company to tap the Big Hole river at
Maiden Rock for the purpose of getting
water with which to supply the r
of Butte.. This fact lias been eviueuceu j
by the commencement of a suit in the dis- :
triet court having as its object the con- j
demnation of a strip of ground twenty
" .
residents j
videnced j
i
2

2
Z
X
Y
T
$
à
Y

!
I
I
j
1
n its work is com- '
, , ,, .. . , r
Piote Butte will have a supply of water 1
which for purity and quantity cannot be j
excelled anywhere in the west. I
The complaint alleges that the plaintiff |
has appropriated water rights on the 1
feet wide, under the surface of which
pipes are to be laid from the point stated
to the reservoir now being built at
Walkerville. The enterprise is quite an
extensive one, but w
Big Hole river and Divide creek and is
now constructing a pumping station op
posite Maiden Rock, on the former
stream; that it has also constructed a
for
reservoir near Walkerville for the pur- ;
pose of storing the water, which it in- j
tends to conduct from the river through
24 and 26-inch pipes, laid four feet below
the surface of the ground.
The line of pipe is to extend from the
new reservoir west to a point near the
Sciiool of Mines and thence south to
Maiden Rock in as direct a line as possi
ble. The suit is being handled by the
law firm of John Forbis for General Man
ager Carroll of the water company and
is against the following persons:
Mary Ann Ward, administratrix of the
estate of Michael Duggan and Mary
Duggan; Mrs. W. H. Stratton, Endora
'Shaughnessy, ML Shaughnessy, Phil
Shaughnessy, Thomas Lavell, Jack La
voll, S. Marchesseau, Peter
Alice Roach, as administratrix of the
estate of Jeremiah Roach; Henry Turner,
Abner Gile, J. C. Stettheimer, Louis
Stettheimer, Leopold Stettheimer, Charles
A. Bayless, Hannah Bayless, George A.
H. Scott, Mary E. Scott, Richard P.
Blaisdell, Gertrude Blaisdell, Fred Lewis,
Rose Lewis, Savarta Smith, Mary Rut
lodge., James A. Murray, Ludwig
Streicher, Agnes Streicher, Frederick»
Rinehardt, Gotlc-ib Rinehardt, Jacob
Streicher, Judith Cocii, Frederick Cocli,
John George Streicher, Maria Barbara
Weiblin, Marie Weiblin, George Weiblin,
Catherine Streicher, George Streicher,
Judith Fritz, Gotfried Fritz, Helenor
Weiblin, George Weiblin, John Streicher,
Barbara Baslen, Heinrich Streicher, Ju
ditha Reusch, Elizabeth Oswald, Jo
hannes Oswald, Christine Steifel, Jacob
Fritz, Albert Baslin, Martha Streicher,
George Streicher, Christine Freudenstein,
Lulu F. Largey, as administratrix of the
estate of P. A. Largey; Patrick Conlon,
Frederick W. J. Diedrick and August
Milz.
The court is asked to appoint three per
sons to appraise the value of the property
sought to be condemned.
Valiton,
The firm of Clark Bros., bankers, has
instituted suit against John Caplice
John Brannagan and John Caplice as ad
ministrator of the estate of Fred W.
Caplice, deceased, to recover judgment
for $146,959.50, thé bulk of which "is al
leged to be due on promissory notes. The
complaint states that on December 30,
1893, John Caplice & Co. and the defend
ante, as Individuals, executed to the
plaintiff four notes for $5,000 eacli and
one for $100,000, and John Caplice and
John Smith executed an additional one
for $11,722.50. An agreement was then
entered into by which the defendants
covered the whole amount, $175,602.80, and
hypothecated 1,600 shares of stock in the
John Caplice company as security. The
complaint further alleges that the only
payment so far made was $20,000, in
1897
An attorney's fee of $2,500 is asked
for.
A warrant charging Jerry Kennough
with assault in the first degree on H.
C. Moughton was issued last evening by
Justice Nichols with the sanction of tlie
county attorney. Moughton told Corne
lius Kelly that on Monday night Ken
nougli struck him on the head with a
club. The blow knocked him down, h
said, and Kennough tiien drew a knife
and made a lunge at his heart, but he
threw up his left arm and the blade
buried itself in the muscles. He showed
the wound and had with him a friend who
corroborated his story. Asked wh.it
caused Kennough to make the assault,
Moughton said he was employed at the
Butte & Boston smelter and Kennough
lived at his house, located on the Parrot
,
flat. He had suspected Kennough and
his wife of being a little too intimate, but
decidtïd to accumulate evidence before
making any bad breaks. Monday night
his wife was away from home and. be
lieving she and Kennough were together,
he visited a saloon near by and started
to enter via a side door. Just as he did
so the door flew open and Kennough
pasted him with the club.
$20 sets of teeth $10. Dr. Wix. •
THE CARLISLE INQUEST.
The inquiry into the death of Joshua
L. Carlisle, the musician whose dead body
was found lying in Missoula gulch Sun
day afternoon, conducted by Coroner
Phil Jullien at Richards' undertaking
rooms, developed nothing new, and the
story of the finding of Carlisle's remains,
as published in the Inter Mountain Mon
day evening, was practically the same as
the evidence adduced last night.
Misses Sheba Storms, Mamie Tivohy
and Nellie Mozel testified to noticing the
body of a man lying near the mouth of a
storm sewer in Missoula gulch, and sent
two boys, Willie McNulty and Willie Mc
Laughlin, to investigate. The boys came
back and reported that the man was
dead.
J. K. Heslet, who resides at the corner
of Galena and Crystal streets, testified
that he had been awakened about 4
o'clock Sunday morning by some one
ringing his doorbell. He answered the
bell and found Carlisle, who was very
much under the influence of liquor, at the
door, and who said he was lost and
wished to be directed to Butte. Witness
experienced considerable difficulty in get
ting him started In the right direction.
Other witnesses testified to the finding
of the remains lying at the mouth of the
storm sewer, with the head lying, face
downward, in the water, and the con
census of opinion was that the deceased
while intoxicated had fallen into the wa
ter. the fall rendering him unconscious,
and while in this unconscious condition
he was drowned.
The verdict of the jury was to the ef
fect that the deceased came to his death
by accidental drowning.
IN A SMASHUP.
TWO BUTTE MEN KNOW WHAT A
TRAIN WRECK IS. .
John W. Jaquette, cutter at Henry Jo
nas' tailor shop, and Charles Foye of
the Connell store returned a few days ago
j incidents tile trip
: hitch, save the occasion on which they
j hitched two horses to^ a light rig^and
from Colorado, where they spent their
j sunlnler vacation. Outside of a few little
j incidents the trip was made without a
drove into the country from a convenient
! railroad station on the line of march. One
I of the "little incidents" of the pilgrim
I age was the wreck of the train on which
j they were returning to Butte. It took
1 place about 9 o'clock at night on the
' Denver & Rio Grande road. It hail been
raining heavily and the ground on tlie»
1 h „ lBkl " B was so Boft and treacherous that
j a slide at one point covered the track to
I a depth of several feet. Having come
| down only a few minutes before train
1 time, it was not discovered until too lat
to prevent the train from dashing into
it at full speed. The locomotive and s*v- j
eral cars were overturned and smashed, j
but, strange as it may seem, 110 passeu
rs were hurt. The engineer and lire- ,
; man, however, were badly injured, tli
j former being found under the mail
He was conscious, and his first words
were of inquiry as to the safety «if the
passengers. Then he asked that his wife
be not notified of what had happened.
Messrs. Jaciuelte and Foye were some
what shaken by the accident, but other
wise felt no evil effects of tlm disaster.
JACK BURNS DEAD.
HE WAS A VERY POPULAR RAIL
ROAD MAN.
News was received in Butte today of
the death at Dallas, Tex., a few days ago
of "Jack" Burns, a veteran railroader,
i who was personally known by thousands
of railroad men in the west.
Jack was connected with the Union Pa
cific in Butte for a number of years, and
was later appointed yardmaster of
the Montana Union, which position he re
linquished about three years ago to ac
cept the superintendency of W. A. Clark's
road, the United Verde & Pacific, operat
ing between Jerome and Jerome Junction.
About a year ago he resigned this po
sition and was nominated for the office
of sheriff of Yavapai county, Arizona, by
the republicans. He was defeated. Later
he accepted a position in the train ser
vice of the Southern Pacific between Tus
carora and El Paso, which position he
held at the time of his death.
Jack Burns was very popular with his
fellow employes.
AT THE HOTELS.
The Butte—John G. Bayliss, G. E. Dal
ton, Chicago; Adiel Sherwood and wife,
St. Louis; Gordbn Clewes, London; Frank
G. Higgins, Missoula; Andrew Urquhart,
Hassel; Charles Schwartz, St. Paul; B. J.
Fine, Virginia City: F. S. Metzei, L. A.
Metzei, C. M. Metzel, Puller Springs; M.
j L. Hewett and wife. Basin; Fred H.
Newcombe, New York; J. M. Kaufman,
New York: O. N. Whitney, P. M. Nich
olas, Now York; T. T. Lyon, Boulder; D.
! B - Sparks, New York,
The McDermott—Madame Miles, Butte;
W. B. Welch, city; Robert Hurd, Du
j buque; W. W. Merk and family, Spokane;
w. A. Selvidge, Helena; Thomas Gibson,
Helena; W. I. Higgins, E. Scharnikow,
Deer Dodge; E. A. Lyte, wife and two
children, Millersville, Pa.; T. M. Howard,
Omaha; Mrs. C. W. Miller, Boulder; C.
C. Newman, Helena; Miss Botkin, Wash
ington, D. C.
CRYSTAL SPRINGS.
You miss the opportunity of your life
if you do not give Crystal Springs a call.
One who has been there once will always
call again. Only five miles from Butte.
Finest bicycle road in the country. Elec
tric fountain display every evening. The
j only one in the state. Best cafe and bar.
j Service strictly first-class. Most modern
i improved plunge and private baths,
! Open all day and night. Boating on the
lake. •
j
NOTICE.
Boring of artesian well at Crystal
Springs will be commenced this week.
NOTICE.
My wife, Rosa Cox, having violated bpr
marriage obligations and left my bed
and board without cause, after this date
I will no' be responsible for any debts
contracted by her
July 24, 1899.
JOHN J. GOX.
Holbrook has a swell line of red shoes
for children. *
(Beware of water-borne diseases, you
can now have pure water, even if you
cannot have pure air in Butte. We rent
you a Pasteur Family Filter placed over
your sink for $1.25 a month. Butte water
cannot be rivala^fwhen sterilized with
this filter. Spring water cannot 6e com
pared with it, and is inconvenient and
more expensive. This is not a cheap
strainer but an absolute Germ Proof Fil
ter. Cali on Pasteur Filter Co., 238 E
Park street, It. J. Bohlcr, Agent.
John N. Olson, Music Teachpr and Or
chestra, 126 West Granite. •
You car» make many a dollar In Jur.k
when you ge: the right prices and cor
rect weights. Send us a trial shipment of
scrap brass, copper, iron, rubber, etc.,
and you will be satisfied.
334 and 336 South Arizona. Butte.
ZEEVE JUNK CO.,
Call at 30 Silver Bow block for tickets
and information concerning Yellowstone
Park excursions.
NEED SOME MONEY.
SGHOOL BOARD ASKS FOR A LEVY
OF SEVEN AND A-HALiF
MILLS.
At last night's meeting of the board of
education, a resolution asking for a tax
levy of mills for school purposes, was
adopted, and this will be presented to
the board of county commissioners. The
resolution asks for a levy of 5 mills for
the general fund, 1 mill for the building
fund, 1 mill for free text books, and the
fraction will be levied to the sinking fund.
The janitor and supply committee pre
sented the following report:
"Your janitor and supply committee
beg to make the following report and re
commendations:
"First. After examining the several
school desks offered, we find that the
desks offered by Davis & Green, non-ad
Justable, sizes from one to six, at from
$2 to $2.50 per desk, be purchased.
"Second. That they be awarded the
contract for supplying hyloplate at 13
cents imr square foot, all f. o. b. Butte.
"VVe also recommend that the clerk be I
authorized to draw up the necessary con- j
tract with Davis & Green for desks and j
hyloplate, and that they be requested to ;
furnish a good bond in the sum of $1,000
for the faithful performance of their con
tract.
"As to the blinds, the committee asks
for further time to report."
Trustee Lane opposed the report. He
j
j
,
was
n fa\
or o
an adjustable d
esk, but
after
sonn
disc
ussion a moti
on
to adopt
the
•eport
pri
vailed, Mr. J
■ voting
agair
St till
mot
ion.
Bid
s for
kals
«mining the C
oloi
ado and
East
Cent«
rvill
« schools and
painting the
old 1
igh s
clioo
building on
S as
Broad
way were
hen
opened as foil
>w>
Gei
rge .
. Dr
ivls & Co.—C
»lor
id o and
East
Crnti
rvill
■, $160; Wash!
ifiTtc
n build
ing, $
250.
G re
ggs 1
'aint
Co.— Kaisern
nin
g Color
ado
llld
Cast
Centerville
l»ui
dings, 6
cents
per
'«qua
re yard; roof
of
ild high
school, 65 i
cuts
per square; w
oo d
work of
sa me
$130.
Charles Schatzlein —Kalsomining Col
orado building, $50; kalsomining East
Centerville, $75; painting interior of old
high school building, $109. No bid was
received for the roof work.
Clark Bros.—Kalsomining Colorado
and East Centerville buildings, 4% cents
ppr square yard; roof of old high school
building, t!0 cents per square of 100 feet.
No bid for the painting of the wood work
was received.
Joseph Lally—Kalsomining Colorado
and East Centerville buildings, 8 cents
per yard; roof of East Broadway build
ing, 80 cents per square and wood work,
$1.60.
Tlio bids were referred to the building
committee with authority to act.
On Trustee White's motion it was de
cided to paint the interior of the old high
school building.
Architect O'Brien's report showed that
building material to the value of $15,101.40
had been supplied for the construction of
tin* Atlantic street school, leaving a bal
ance of $6,300 due the contractor, and a
warrant for that amount was ordered
drawn.
The building committee's estimate of
the cost of repairs on the different, school
buildings was as follows: Adams school,
$370; Washington, $1,370; Lincoln, $11;
Garfield, $74; North Walkerville, $32.80;
East Walkerville, $78.50; West Walker
ville, $91.95; Blaine, $120. The work was
authorized.
The board decided to insure the Atlan
tic street school to the extent of $15.000.
Unless Thomas Rowan signs the con
tract for the construction of the Alumin
um street and furnishes a bond by
morrow night, his contract will be
yoked.
I
re
The Argosy, Quaker and Wide World
for August at the Postoffice news
stand.
GREAT DOG AND PONY SHOW.
Professor Gentry and Ills handsome and
talented dogs, ponies and monkeys, over
200 in number, arc booked to appear in
Butte for four nights, under a large
waterproof tent at South Jackson, near
West Galena street, four days, starting
Monday, July 31, afternoon and even
ing.
It is not often the children of our city,
and perhaps the older ones, too, have
such a treat in store. Professor Gentry's
dogs and ponies are famous the world
over as the most intelligent of their kind.
The entertainment is one that especially
recommends itself to our citizens because
it is moral and pure and at tRe same
time highly amusing. The animals are
the most beautiful procurable, and to
see Hum without their clever acting is
worth the admission alone. Matinees,
(.specially for ladies and children, will be
given daily at 2:30 p. m. The price of ad
mission is low indeed: Adults, 35 cents;
children, 25 cents.
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1
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:
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ATTRACTIVE DINING CARS.
"Nothing adds more to the attractive
ness of a train than a pleasant, attractive
dining car. Those attached to the Pio
neer Limited of the Milwaukee road—the
only perfect train in the world—will
make an epicure smile with satisfaction.
Carved, decorated, cool and dainty, the
tallies covered with spotless Irish Satin
damask, and set with Haviland China
and silverware of the rare old English
oval shape, to look is to hunger and wel
come the call to refreshments."
Ladies' tan shoes for half price at Hol
brook's. *
YELLOWSTONE PARK EXCURSIONS.
j
!
\
If you are contemplating a. trip to the
1 Yellowstone park, come and see me for
1 tickets and other information. I repre
sent Thresher's excursions and Lycan,
I the veteran camping man of Bozeman.
W. T. BOA RDM AN.
Room 12, 23 W. Grant street.
$20 sets of teeth $10. Dr. Wix. •
Commencing Monday, July 10, the city
ticket and passenger offices of the North
ern Pacific, Great Northern, Denver &
Rio Grande Western, Oregon Short Line,
Union Pacific and Burlington railroads
will be conducted on a daylight schedule
only, closing at 6 p. m. daily.
Use Gebo Coal. J. Q. Goss Jr., State
eg« at. 32 Silver Bow Block. Tel 357.
$20 sets of teeth $10. Dr. Wix.
I
j
j
;
Fancy
Summer
Shirts:
Zephyrs,
Madras,
Wool,
Silk.
Those
$1.50 Silk
Front Shirts
Now
85 cents
Our Great
Semi-Annual
Cut-Price
Clothing Sale
Means a saving to you of 25 to 45 per
cent. We are moving Suits very rapidly,
so, if you are hard to fit, come early. No
Suit reserved, from cheapest to finest
tailor-made French Worsteds.
$6 Suits now $3.80
$7 Suits now $4.35
$15 Suits now $8.25
$18. Suits now $12.40
MA
GRANITE
ryrrr
DR. RINEHART
The San Francisco
PAINLESS DENTIST.
Work Guaranteed and Prices Reasonable.
Teeth Extracted Without Pain. Parties at a
distance given five days notice.
14 West Park St.
TELEPHONE 272.
J. N. WILLS & CO.
Campbell's
Horse Foot
Remedy
Has been used freely on this beast. No
tice how spry lie is. If your horse is
troubled with corns, quarter cracks,
hard, dry, brittle, tender or contracted!
feet, try the above remedy, and if not
perfectly satisfactory your money will
he refunded. For sale by
Harness and Saddlery
PHONE 544
Silver Block, 106 E. Park.
TRY ALLEN'S FOOT-EASE,
A powder to be shaken into the shoes.
At this season your feet feel swollen, ner
| vous and hot, and get tired easily. If you
: have smarting feet or tight shoos, try Al
1 ion's Foot-Ease. It cools the feet and
! makes walking easy. Cures swollen and
I sweating feet, blisters and callous spots.
I Relieves corns and bunions of all pain
: ar.d gives rest ar.d comfort. Try it to
day. Sold by all druggists and shoe
stores for 25c. Trial package FREE. Ad
| dress, Allen S. e busted, Le Roy, N. Y.
$20 sets of teeth $10. Dr. IVix. •
nnrrcnn Suits and Pants spongad
rKCJjniJ and cleaned. C. F. Fisher,
j tailor shop No. 3 W. Galena. Prices easy.
! High-grade tan colored shoes for $2.85
\ this week at Holbrook's. The former
price of these shoes was $5. *
Commencing Sunday, July 9, the Butte,
Anaconda & Pacific railway will make
a rate of $1.00 for the round trip Butte
to Anaconda, and reiurn. This rate will
be in effect Sundays only. Tickets will
also be sold from Butte to Mountain
View park at above rats Sundays only.
SUMMER EXCURSIONS.
Great Northern Railway, commencing
May 13:
Boulder and return .................$1.90
Sold Saturday and Sunday; good until
Monday.
Boulder and return .................$1.00
Basip and return ...................$1.00
Sold Sundays only; good returning
same day.
J. E. DAWSON,
General Agent, 41 North Main street.
JUST OPENED
WESTERN CASH GROCERY
715 UTAH AVENUE
New Stock, New Goods, at Low
est Cash Prices. We solicit
your patronage.
DR. CHUNG'S CeleDratei
Herb Sanitarium
Guarantees to cure all
diseases by means of his
famous Chinese medi
cines. never before intro
" duced into this country.
He has cured thousands
and can cure you. Advice free. 39 West
nalanA atrMt Butt«. MOHL
iii
Columbia Gardens, open free every day
of the week. Open air concert by Ross
ner's orchestra on Tuesday and Thurs
day afternoon and evening. Free danc
ing for children Saturday afternoon from
3 to 5 o'clock. Special rates and induce
ments given picnic parties. Sommers
family at Garden theater Sunday after
noon and evening. •
Women
Who are suffering from the diseases p
cnliar to women, will not be subjected t
ombarasiug examinations by consultiu]
PROF. C. SULLIVAN
312 W. Broadway, Butte.
Telephone 215. Hours 2 to 5—7 to I
Consultation Free. Ail ctrrespondenc
strictly confidential. Call or write fo
Woman's Hook Free.
Good Jersey
Milch Cows
For Sale
Driving Horses for Sale#
Inquire
BircUals Set Fan
29 W. Broadway,

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