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Daily inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1881-1901, August 18, 1899, Image 4

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053057/1899-08-18/ed-1/seq-4/

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|Get the Best f
fWe Have it. |
i ABBEY & IMBRIE '$
i £
| Fishing Tackle!
* Rods from ............. Kc enc.h up £
3 Reels from .............. 25c each up)»
g Lines from ...............5c each upï
^ Flies from ........... 25c per doz up ^
Ç SPAULDING'S BASE BALL Y
i GOODS are the best. We have!?
^ everything you need in this line. ^
jcALKINS' b stobe..|
^ 209 Main St., Butte Mont I
'*0$
M
m
*4
Gets Stoves
ForSale or Rent.
NO bin, tacke ti Aslies to Bothe
BUTTE GAS LIGHT AND
COKE CO.
48 East Broadway
WE BUY
Bell, Repair, Store. Pack and Ship, Rent
:■ Exchange Furniture with you.
Exch'g,
». CHAUVIN. Agent.
42 W. Broadway,Butte
Butte Exch'g. Furniture
i 1 i W WWWWWWWWWWW9
MoMToilCalef
And Oyster Parlors. J
The First Class Restaurant oft
the city. BEST OF MEALSi
15 Cents and upward.
Private Rooms for Ladles*
Also Dealer«: in
Chinese and Japanese^
Fancy Goods ♦
Best Teas, Flv.e Silks,Chinnwave Etc$
4 S7 W. Park St., Botte. J
j HUM FAY. Prop, and Mgr)
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦
Huie Pock & Co.,
Merchant Tailors
Chinese and Japanese Fancy
Goods. Ladies' and Gentle
men's Underwear made to or
der! Teas, Chinaware, Etc.
22j S. Main Street, Butte
NOTICE TO CO-OWNERS. j
To Patrick W. Murray and the estate of
fjir>hntia a vp«s vnnr Sni™ —
Nicholas Ayers, your heirs, executoi -3
administrators and assigns:
You are hereby notified that the under
signed, your co-owners, in accordance
with the provisions of section 2324 of the
Revised Statutes of the United States,
expended in labor and Improvements on
the Lottie quartz lode mining claim, situ
ate in the Summit Valley mining district.
Silver Bow county, Montana, the notice
of which is recorded in book "G." at page
138, of the records of lode claims of said
county, the sum of twenty-fine ($25) dol
lars in the years 1895, 1896, 1897 and 1898,
in representing the said lode claim for the
said years, said payment covering the
portion of the representation of said
claim, which belong to your interest, and
that of the undersigned. And If within
90 days after the completion of the ser
vice of this notice by itublication, you
fail or refuse to pay the undersigned your
proportion of the said representation
work, your share (P. W. Murray) $100,
j
i
I
j

and the estate of Nicholas Ayers $25, for j
representing work in the year 1898, ac
cording to your interest in the said min
ing claim, that your interest in the said
lode claim will become the property of
the undersigned in accordance with the
provisions of said section 2324 of the Re
vised Statutes of the United States.
MICHAEL WARD.
Butte, MonU, June 1, 1899.
NOTICE TO TEACHERS.
The regular examination for teachers'
certificates will be held at the office of the
county superintendent of schools August
1$ and 19.
B. P. DOWNEY, t
County Superintendent. I
CHILE'SJFFMRS
Country Is Becoming Pros
perous Once More.
THE THREATENED WAR
With Argentina Had Caused Her to
Increase Her National Debt En
ormously in Order to Be in Readi
ness-Danger is Passed.
Valparaiso, Chile, July 20.—(Corres
pondence of the Associated Press.)—For
the last five or six years, in fact since the
melancholy war of 1S91, the republic of
Chile has been passing through a period
of commercial turmoil and political agi
^ tatlon. Hampered by a heavy internal
I and foreign debt and crushed under the
j burden of a heavy taxation to keep up the
j strength of her navy in view of the possi
j ble conflict with Argentina, it has only
j been within the last few months that the
i prospect has brightened materially. The
• disastrous effects of the financial crisis of
July last year far reaching and serious as
■ they were, have in a great measure been
! gotten over, and the credit of the country
; is better today than it has been for many
j years. Attention is also being directed
j to the wonderful resources of the repub
! lie and industries that have long been
j dormant are gradually being revived.
! New fields for the employment of capital
I aie also being exploited and general trade
j which for years has been in a stagnant
condition is gradually improving.
During the few years the mineral and
other wealth of the country has been al
most entirely neglected, and' the home
and foreign debt of the republic went up
by leaps and bounds. The foreign debt!
i had risen from $47,927,900 in 1891 to about
$80,000,000 last year. The financial credit
; of the country' was very bad. and last
year intensified the situation. Nominally
Chile has no state bank, but there re 20
banks of issue. The joint capital of these
put down at $20,SIS,829, and the régis
ssue at $13,448.361. This issue
tered
supposed to be guaranteed by deposits in
gold and government securities in the
treasury. A. conversion law came into
force February 11, 1895, providing that the
redemption of the paper currency should
be effected from June 1 of that year at the
rate of 37 cents per dollar, and authoriz
ing the issue of coinage. The outstanding
notes and currency December 31, 1896,
000,000
"" rly s<
For a time the republic struggled nobly
j to get rid of its own paper money and es
I tablished' a gold standard. But in the mid
j «He of July, 1S98. in consequence of outra
j geous expenditures on battleships and
I armament, the government could not
meet some of its liabilities, and one of
I the leading banks found itself in difficul
ties. This soon leaked out and a rush
I was miade on the Banco del Chile, with
j the result that the government, in order
to save* the situation, had to order a gen
' eral suspension of payments for a period
of 30 days. A financial crisis followed,
with the result that another issue of $50,
600.000 in paper had to be made, and as a
consequence business of every character
lISÄÄ me C ÏSum C, o U n
gold rosé as^illi al 50 per cent n
! A threatened rupture with Argentina
! was an ever present spectre of alarm to
1 the Chilean statesmen. Treaties had been
i signed so far back as 1081 by both nations
! providing that any disagreement about
j the limits of territory should be referred
! to the arbitration of a friendly power.
: But, in both republics a military spirit
i ran rampage. Both governments were
building or purchasing warships in Eu
rope. and at home the- national guards
were called out and drilled preparatory
to a declaration of war.
Peaceful counsel, however, at length
prevailed, and about the end of Novem
ber last both Argentina and Chile agreed
to refer the question of their boundary to
arbitration. All the boundary to the
south of latitude 26 degrees was referred
ritory is set at rest, and it will enable
Chile to settle down and devote herself to
internal affairs unhampered by the fear
of a foieigii war. The other tribunal is
to the queen of Upland, while that run
rough the Puna del Atlanca to the
n.ng thv
north, was submitted to a conference of
Chilean and Argentine representatives,
presided over by United States Minister
! Buchanan. The award of the latter tri
bunal was given in March. Three-fourths
of the Puna is in future to be under the
sovereignty of Argentina and one-fourth
under that of Chile.
Although the decision appears to have
pleased neither side, still a long standing
quarrel about a piece of unproductive ter
sitting in I.ondon, and it® decision is
looked for wth some anxiety.
Nothing tended to more bring the coun
try back to its normal state than the
meeting of President Roca of the Argen
tine republic and President Errazuriz of
Chile on board a Chilean battleship in
the straits of Magellan, February 15 last.
This act of international cordiality soft
ened the sentiments of antagonism
aroused by the threatened rupture be
tween the two republics, and' the agree
ment then practically concluded between
the two presidents will tend to bring into
close and friendly relations the republics
of Argentine and Chile. Daily every
thing points to a lasting tranquility. The
late extravagant expenditure for arma
ments and ammunition is commencing to
be pared down.
The expenditures voted by congress at
the beginning of February for the current
year amounted to $94,566,129. If these
items which are of a character altogeth r
xcept'.onal are eliminated, this is about
the average sum voted for the last four
years. The exceptional items are $10,000,
000 to form the conversion fund of $1,
444,444, as the extraordinary loan from the
bank of London and Tarapaca, and $652,
A POINTER FOR YOU âSJTR.
RAMONA Teas and Coffees
And get the best the market affords. All grocers.
150 for the purchase of financial bills.
There is now every probability that the
oureumstances which called for these
items will never occur again.
All along the west coast, especially in
the mineral region, signs are showing of
a great revival of trade. In the Coquimbo
district this is strongly manifested, no
doubt, partly owing to the sudden rise in
the price of copper. In Serena there have
recently been presented'many mining pe
titions, and several prospecting parties
have left for the interior in search of sil
ver and copper. Many silver mines are
daily being opened up and exploited. A
new English company, under the title of
the Copper Corporation of Chile, has pur
chased the mines and smelting works at
Chandiral. This syndicate, which has a
capital of $1,000,000. will soon commence
operations under the direction of Mr. Al
fred Libby, a well known American en
gineer. Altogether the republic seems to
have entered on a new era of prosperity,
both politically and commercially.
Distress Is Awful.
of the terrible conditions have not been
New York, Aug. 18.—A dispatch to the
Herald from San Juan, Porto Rico, says:
Visits to the most distressed districts of
the island prove that the former reports
in the least exaggerated. People in the
towns are huddled together anywhere for
shelter. In the country the people are
sleeping in the ODen air. The food sup
plies have been totally destroyed. Only
the well-to-do can afford to buy pro
visions. Unless succor comes in a few
days the people will starve. The sup
plies from San Juan nave not yet ar
rived at the towns, but are expected. The
depots in many towns are already sur
rounded by a large number of hungry
ayors of the towns have
people. The may
received no authority to dispense money,
but most of them are contributing gen
erously out of their own pockets to sup
ply the most urgent needs.
As far as Caguas and Cayey, the san
itary conditions are not threatened, but
reports from the towns further south
state that their condition is dangerous.
The peril lies in the herding of the in
habitants in the towns. 'Several of the
soldiers were wounded during the recent
hurricane, but it is learned that there
were no deaths among them. The best
i posted persons agree that it will be neces
| sar / to provide work for the inhabitants
and seeds for the next planting.
! .u' a * report; fl 'om Guayarnas says
tha ^ 26r ' houses were destroyed 172 seri
™ S J>L in T j P r l a ana _, 2( l 4 _ da P' a ? e J 'L
storm 1 . In the district surrounding May
aguez, scores of women, old men and
children are homeless and begging shel
! * er an< ^ food, the schooner Concepcion
loadad with 200 Porto Ricans as
! l i™' g ; ra i lts }° Samana, went adrift today,
1 * " ' ~ J '
All jumped overboard and several were
drowned. A Mayaguez paper reminds
the public that in the year 1841 the city
waa destroyed by fire. Two days later
the governor was personally distributing
$50,000 among those who most needed it.
In Arrayo 90 per cent of the houses were
demolished by the hurricane. At the
port nothing remains. A number of
prominent persons in Nuatado have
signed an appeal to the public asking
for food and work for the inhabitants.
Two thousand persons have perished in
this whole district.
Cause of Franey's Death.
San Francisco, Aug. IS.—The autopsy
held on the remains of Jim Franey, the
pugilist, who died after having been
knocked out by Frank McConnell on
Wednesday night, showed that his vital
organs were diseased, that he was in no
condition to enter a ring arid principally
that he had been pummelled and beaten
l ° by P , rank M 5 Conn f' " h " was
arrested on a charge of manslaughter and
is now olrt 0,1 k ail - A similar charge lias
a,so bet?n Placed against J. J. Groom and
Gibbs, promoters of the fight, Hiram
Cook, the referee, and the seconds of both
nlen engaged in the contest. All have
given bonds and are now at liberty. Dr.
J. L. Zabal, the city autopsy physician,
«»xplains the cause of the pugilist's death
as follows:
''I found severe contusions on Franey's
face, shoulders and upper arms. There
was a hemorrhage of the brain on the left
side, and the organ itself was in an anae
mic condition. The man must received
terrible punishment, and death was noth
ing more than the result of the blows
which were rained on his face and head.
The impact of the head on the floor had
nothing to do with it. He was in a dying
Pondltion before he fell. Franey should
never have entered the ring. An exam
ination of his lungs showed pleural pa
ralysis. He was certainly unfit for un
natural exertion."
Oakland, Cal., Aug. 18.—The dead body
of a man, believed to be John W. Walton,
May Have Been Mui dered.
a resident of Albuquerque, N. M.. has ;
, * , „ . .. . . « « — , j
been found floating in the bay at the font >
of Seventh street. Many cuts and bruises
on the face and head lend strength to the
suspicion that the man may have met i
with foul play.
AN EDUCATIONAL LESSON.
Is the boring of the new artesian well at
Crystal Springs. The plan of sinking
this well is based upon the'principle of
the Pennsylvania coal oil field wells. The
management will be pleased to show all
visitors the sinking and the operation of
the machinery. The machinery for sink
ing this new well is operated day and
night, and the management jwill l|kve an
electric light at the well, softnat dll vis
itors may see the working*-öf tfib well
during the night. •
Commencing Sunday, July 9, the Butte.
Anaconda & Pacifi«« railway will make
a rate of $1.00 for the round ttip Butte
to Anaconda and return. This 'rate will j
be in effect Sundays only. Tickets will ;
aiso be sold from Butte to Mountain ;
View park at above rats Sundays only. |
Mountain
Mont.
House Coal, Trail Creek,
WELLMAN BACK
From His Voyage to
Arctic Regions.
the
DISCOVERED NEW LANDS
But Had a Most Hazardous Trip and
Returns to His Home a Cripple—
A Grim Story of Tragedy is Re
lated By Him.
Tromsoe, Island of Tromsoe, Norway,
Aug. 17.—Walter Wellman and the sur
vivors of the Polar expedition led by
him, arrived here this evening on the
steamer Capelle, having successfully
completed their exploration in Franz Jo
sef land. Mr. Wellman has discovered
important new lands and many islands.
The expedition brings a grim story of
Arctic tragedy. In the autumn of 1898
an outpost called Fort McKinely was es
tablished in latitude 81. It was a hut
built of rocks and roofed over with wal
rus hides. Two Norwegians Paul Bior
___' „ .
vig and Bert Bentzen, the latter of whom
was with Nansen on the Fram, remained
there. The main party wintered in a can
vas-covered hut named Harmsworth
house, at Cape Tegethoff, on the south
ern point of Hall's inlet. About the mid
dle of February, before the rise of the
sun to its winter height, Mr. Wellman,
with three Norwegians and 45 dogs, start
ed north. It was the earliest sledge jour
ney on record in that high latitude. On
reaching Fort McKinley, Mr. Wellman
found Bentzen dead, but Bjorvig, accord
ing to promise, had kept the body in the
house, sleeping beside it through the two
months of Arctic darkness. Notwith
standing his terrible experience, the sur
vivor was safe and cheerful.
Pushing northward through rough ice
and severe storms with a continuous
temperature of 10 days between 40 and
50 degrees below zero, the party found
new lands north of Freedom island, where
Nansen landed in 1885. By the middle of
March all hands were confident of reach
ing latitude 87 or 88. If not the pole itself.
Then began a succession of disasters. Mr.
Wellman, while leading the party, fell
into a snow covered crevasse, seriously
injuring <jne of his legs and compelling a
retreat. Two days later the party was
aroused at midnight by an icequake
under them, due to pressure. In a few
moments many dogs were crushed and
their sleds destroyed. The members of
the expedition narrowly escaped with
their lives, though they managed to save
their precious sleeping bags and some
dogs and provisions.
On Mr. Wellman's condition becoming
alarming, and inflammation having set
in, the brave Norwegians dragged him on
a sledge, by forced marches, nearly 200
miles to headquarters, arriving there
early last April.
Mr. Wellman is still unable to walk,
and will probably be permanently crip
pled. After reaching headquarters, other
members of the expedition explored re
gions hitherto unknown, and important
scientific work was done by Lieutenant
weither büreau'Vr. EdlaÄfmln^f
Grand Haven, Mich., and A. Harlan of
the United States coast survey.. The ex
pedition killed 47 bears and many wal
_____
...__
UTAH S UNIQUE AND INTERESTING
ruses.
The Capella arrived at Cape Tegethoff
in search of the expedition in July last.
One morning she met the Estella Polar
bearing the expedition headed by Prince
Luigi, duke of Abruzzi, which had sailed
from the Archangel to reconnoiter north
west of Franz Josef land and to meet, if
possible, the Wellman expedition.
Mr. Wellman and his companions found
no trace in Franz Josef land of the miss
ing aeronaut, Professor Andre.
THE PALACE OF SALT.
PRODUCTION.
The salt palace in Salt Lake City, con
structed frohi salt crystals formed in the
brine of Great Salt Lake, is the most
novel enterprise ever undertaken in the
west. The main building is a veritable
crystal palace, and no adequate idea of
the dazzling effect can be secured except
from a personal view of the exhibition.
Connected with the palace is a Midway
Plaisance, including Hagenback's great
wild animal ,show' and the fastest bicycle
track in the world. The palace is lo
P ated in the heart of Salt Lake City and
occupies about 20 acres of ground. The
only transcontinental line passing direct
ly through Salt Lake City is the Rio
cerning the magnificent route, call on or
address W. C. M'BRIDE,
Grande Western railway. Stop-over
privileges given at Salt Lake City on all
classes of through tickets. This line op
erates through Pullman palace and ordi
nary sleeping cars, free reclining chair
cars and a perfect dining car service. For
rates, maps and other information con
W. C.
Gen. Agent, 47 East Broadway, Butte.
TRY ALLEN'S FOOT-EASE,
A powder to be shaken Into the shoe9.
At this season your feet feel swollen, ner
vous and hot, and get tired easily. If you
have smarting feet or tight shoes, try Al
ien's Foot-Ease. It cools the feet and
makes walking easy. Cures swollen and
___ ____
sweating feet, blisters and callous spots,
Relieves corns and bunions of all pain
t , gives reät and comfort. Try it to
da „ g 0 i d by a n druggists and shoe
s toies for 25c. Trial package FREE. Ad
dress, Allen S. - 'msted, Le Roy, N. Y.
UK VST A I. SPRINGS.
You miss the opportunity of your life
if you do not give Crystal Springs a call.
One who has been there once will always
cull again. Only five miles from Butte.
Finest bicycle road In the country. Elec
tric fountain display every evening. The
only one in the state. Best cafe and bar.
Service strictly first-class. Most modern
improved plunge and private baths.
Open all day and night. Boating on the
lake. •
THE MOST DIRECT AND SURE METHOD
Of getting the desired returns in small advertisements is through the WANT COL*
UMNS. The thousands of articles advertised here indicates the thousands of read
n ^ r l* l - ^ I °- a . r rfthejeo lumns every day. gee rates below.

n l - .
WANT ADVS
2 Gents Per Word for First Issus
1 Gent Per Word After First Laue
$1.00 Per Lm° Ptr YcBtb.
EMPLOYMENT.
WANTED^A PHYSICIAN, REGI ti
tered in Montana, for office work. Ad
dress I-tox 12S2, Butte.
WANTED—POSITION, BY FIRST
class bookkeeper and all-round otfice
man, with A1 reference. C., Box 769.
WANTED—IMMEDIATELY, A RELIA
ble woman, to assist with" work ii
block, in exchange for rent of house
keeping rooms. Apply at 217 West Ga
lena street.
WANTED—A GOOD TAILORESS, AT
1:. South Wyoming street.
YOUNG MEN—OUR CATALOGUE Ex
plains how we teach barber trade in two
months and place you in position to
earn $60 monthly: special inducements
to applicants from distance: mailed
free. Moler Barber College, Minneapo
lis, Minn.
BICYCLES.
ANOTHER CHANCE TO GET A
wheel at a big discount. The previous
one, valued at $75, was sold for $25.
The present one, started at $60 on July
22 and decreases $1 per day until sold.
Itiis a new 1899 model. A J. Darch, 19
West Broadway.
BUSINESS CHANCES.
FOR SALE—SNAP; FURNITURE OF
three-roomed house, for $25; also house
for rent cheap. Inquire 421 South Ohio
street.
FOR SALE—GOOD PAYING SALOON,
one-half block from Main street; invoice
price, $2,200, for $1,200 cash. W. Case, 26
E. Broadway, room 2.
$2,700 BUYS PROPERTY, CLOSE IN,
that rents for $75 per month—33 per
cent investment on your money. Call
at Room 30, Silver Bow block. S. M.
Wade.
I HAVE FOR SALE 76 LOTS IN THE
central part of the beautiful thriving
city of Twin Bridges; these lots are 50x
140 feet; they arc now for sale at $50.00
each. Lots adjoining these are selling
*t $200.00 each; but these must be sold
Within the next 30 days. Call at room 30,
S'rfWe/ how block, and see platt. S. M.
Wade.
FOR SALE—SMALL LODGING HOUSE,
clears $75 monthly; very cheap. John
son & Pinkston, Owsley block.
FORSALE—LARGE LODGING HOUSE,
profit of $200 monthly. Johnson & Pink
ston, Owsley block.
FOR SALE—LAUNDRY, COAL AND
wood business; new and second hand
furniture store; all the above are estab
lished and paying a good profit. Let
us talk with you on any of them. John
son & Pinkston, Owsley block.
FOR SALE—GOOD PAYING RESTAU
rant, average sales per day $35, for $275.
W. Case, 26 East Broadway, room 2.
FOR SALE—CIGAR AND CONFEC
tionery store at invoice price. W. Case,
26 East Broadway, room 2.
$700 buys a four-room house and lot.
frame building, plastered and in good
condition; city water; rents for $15 per
month. This is 25 per cent on your money
invested. Slemons & Lawler, room 2 Sil
ver Bow block.
FOR SALE — FOUR-ROOM PLAS
tered house, No. 818 George street, with
city water; rents for $15 month; lot 30x
100, for $700. Slemons & Lawlor, rooms
1. 2 and 3. Silver Bow block.
FOR SALE — NEW SEVEN-ROOM
brick, with bath; No. 907 Colorado
street, for $1,850, on easy terms. Sle
mons & Lawlor, rooms 1, 2 and 3, Silver
Bow block.
FOR SALE—FOUR-ROOM HARD FIN
ished frame house, No. 1119 West
Broadway; lot 35x100; for $850, on easy
payments. Slemons & Lawlor. rooms 1,
2 and 3, Silver Bow block.
FOR SALE—DOUBLE BRICK HOUSE
in good condition. No. 1023 Nevada
street; rents for $29 per month; lot 36x
100; for $1,500. Slemons & Lawlor,
rooms 1, 2 and 3 Silver Bow block.
FOR SALE—$2,750; lots 30x100; in the
northern part of the city, two frame
houses; rent $65 per month. Slemons &
Lawlor, rooms 1, 2 and 3, Silver Bow
block.
FOR SALE—ONE COFFEE MILL AND
and counter scales. Good erder 124 W.
Park.
FOR SALE—CIGAR AND CONFEC
tionery store, with first-ciass two
stream goose neck. Rear 72» North
Main street.___
FOR RENT
MODERN NINE-ROOM DWELLING,
519 Dakota street, 50; same house, fur
nished, $60. Thompson Inv. Co., 48 East
Broadway.
FOR RENT—NEW CORNER STORE,
with six rooms on the second floor, East
Side, $60. Thompson Investment Co.,
48 East Broadway.
FOR RENT—MODERN FURNISHED
house, seven rooms. Inquire 840 West
Park.
MONEY TO LOAN
MONEY TO LOAN IN AMOUNTS TO
suit. Thompson Inv. Co., 48 East Broad
way.
MONEY TO LOAN ON REAL ESTATE
and chattel security. Johnson & Pinks «
ton. Owsley block.
MILLINERY.
MILLINERY AN1* HAIR DRESSING
parlors; latest stylet and fashions. Ill
West Broadway.
ASSAYER >
A B. ROM BAUER. SUCCESSOR TO
Carney Sc Band, assayor and chemist,
io- Last Broadway, opposite McDer
mott hotel. P. o. I'.ok 114.
BRADEN & BAPTY,
ASSAYJkitS
123 Hamilton St., (Carney & Hand's old
_____ find.) Officeh oms 7 a. m„ to 9 p. m.
furnished rooms
_ BOARD
The Hotels, Rooming Houses, Restau
rants and other places who are catering
to transient and traveling trade, wi'l find
jt to their benefit in dollars and dimes
, 15Uf . their advertisement under the
above heading, as the Inrer Mountain ia
now circulated cn all the railroads enter
ing Butte.
FOR RENT—SUITE OF ROOMS. 101 W.
Granite.
FOR RENT—A FRONT ROOM, WELL
turniishcd, one block from street car
line, at $8. 430 South Colorado street.
FOR RENT—ONE NEWLY FUR.
nished front room, one-half block from
street car, all conveniences; at 9 West
Gold street.
FOR RENT—ONE FRONT ROOM FOR
light housekeeping; also neatly fur
nished rooms, very reasonable. 434
south Colorado sti'eet.
FOR RENT—FURNISHED ROOMS,
modern conveniences. 205 W. Broadway.
FURNISHED
housekeeping
ROOMS. FOR LIGHT
Rear of 31« W. Galena.
NICELY FURNISHED ROOMS,
steam heat and bath; everything new;
moderate prices. At Mrs. Kelly's, 20
West Quartz street.
NICELY FURNISHED ROOMS, $2 AND
$2.50; also good table board at $5 per
week; use of parlor, including piano.
30 West Quartz street.
DO NOT WASTE YOUR TIME AND
money hunting a boarding house. Go
to Beckwith's, 41 West Park street.
FURNISHED FRONT PARLOR, FOR
gentleman or dressmaker, for rent. 18
West Copper street.
FOR RENT—NICELY FURNISHED
light housekeeping room, suitable for
two ladies; reasonable. 30 West Quartz
street.
FOR RENT—ONE NICELY FUR
nished front room, suitable for man
and wife or two gentlemen. Inquire at
18 West Copper street.
TWO FURNISHED RCO—3 FOR
light housekeeping $10; two 5or $12, two
lodging rooms for men $5 each. 212 N.
Jackson street.
STRICTLY PRIVATE ROOMS FOR
transients. 205 South Arizona street,
over Try Me saloon.
FURNISHED ROOMS—STEAM HEAT,
electric light, baths free Mar.tle block,
16 W. Broadway, west o.' Clark's bank.
MISCELLANEOUS.
WANTED —LADY ROOM-MATE;
cheap rent. 420 East Brotdway.
FOUND—A LADY'S PURSE, NEAR
Spear's park. Call at 922 Caledonia
street.
SEWING DONE FOR LADTES AND
children, reasonable; at 29 East Quartz
street.
MARYLAND CAFE, RE-OPENED
under new management and will be
conducted first-class in every respect;
good meals at modern prices. Fair^
child & Jerman, Proprietors.
WEST SIDE BARBER SHOP—FINEST
baths in the city; poreclain tubs. 10 W.
Park street.
WANTED—OLD IRON 1 ; BRASS. COP.
per, rubber and T rails at highest cash
prices. Correct weight guaranteed.
Zeeve Junk Co., 33C South Arizona
street. P. O. Box 966. Butte.
BUTTE UPHOLSTERING AND STEAM
Carpet Cleaning Co. Montana and
Porphyry streets. 'Phone 119.
DRESSMAKING.
MISS MARY M'CARTHY HAS OPEN
ed dress making parlors at 219 West
Park street. She cordially invites all
her old friends and the public to call.
Work guaranteed.
MEDIUMS.
CONSULT MRS. J. HELD, CLAIRVOY
ant medium, at 321 South Arizona gtreot.
SPECIALISTS
MRS. R. BROWN, 525 COLORADO ST„
cures all fema'e complaints with her
own medicine.
LOS f
LOST—WHITE LLEWELLYN SET
ter, right ear and part of face and left
ear black; suitable reward for his re
turn to 617 West Quartz street.
Hotel Hamilton Stables.
H. S. PAGE, Hamilton, Hont.
Splendid equipment of the finest turn
_uts of all kinds in Hamilton. Carriages
and conveyances at these stables always
ready to convey the public lo any part
of the city or surrounding country at rea
sonable rates. Transient, tourlfc', stock
and commercial trade a specialty.
For the hot summer months we will of
fer the public something very fancy In a
special Un : of silk goods morning and
evening gowns, dressing sacques, negli
gees, wrappers, waists, rhirts, hosiery,
etc. Room 47 and 4S Owsley block. Wein
berg Bros., & Epstein, Proprietors. •

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