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Daily inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1881-1901, August 28, 1899, Image 5

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QUALITY
COUNTS
Some folks say U is a bargain
that wins. We contradict such
statements, and maintain that what
constitutes a bargain is quality and
low price combined. We guarantee
you both.
Fancy Early Rose Potatoes *
per 100 lbs ............... 3>»*25
Sugar Cured Hams,
per lb .................. II CtS
Sugar Cured Breakfast a
Bacon, per pound ....... IO CIS
Sugar Cured Picnic Hams, o _. _
per pound ................ 08 CIS
10 lbs. Granulated Sugar, s.. __
for .................... $1.00
MINERS'
CASH GROCERY
A, BOOTH. CORNER MAIN
AND GALENA.
FANCY BEDS
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No. 601—Fancy White Iron Bed,,
brass trimmed head posts, 54
inches high. In full size or single
$5.00
No. 493—A similar Bed, full size or ,
single, at ..... $3.50
Any $1.00 Brussels Carpet with,
border this week 75c.
See our 45c Linoleum.
See our 25c Floor Oil Cloth.
Special price on Peninsular Steel,
Ranges this week.
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KENNEDY FDRHITDRE GO.
18-20 W. Broadway
simiiiimmiiimiiiiiimiii
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I The Bill Board 1
s That fell on the poor cripple on I
= 14 W. Broadway. Phone 69 =
nimiimiimimmiiiimitaimi'iiimiimimmiiiiiii
J. T. CARROLL
CARRIAGE REPOSITORY
Cor. Arizona and Platinum Sts.
Buggies, Traps,
Phaetons. .. ,n «» grades.
Reduced Prices on Both Rubber
and Steel Tires,
nitchell Delivery and Farm Wagons
Crown flow ers, Thomas Rakes
Men and Women
Who are suffering from diseases peculiar
to their sex will find it to their advan
tage to consult
PROF. C. SULLIVAN
SI2 W. Broadway. Butte.
Hours: 2 to 5; 7 to 9.
Consultation free. Correspondence
strictly confidential. No embarrassing
examinations for ladles.
Stages for Crystal
Springs
Will leave the Club Stables, West Gran
ite .itreet. is follows:
LEAVE STABLES—10 a. n»„ 12 m., 2:30
p. m., 5 p. m.. 8:13'p. m.
LEAVE SPRINGS—11 a. m.. 1:30 p. m..
4 p. <v., 6:30 p. m.. 10:30 p. in.
Fare Each Way 25c.
Mrs. Steve Christian is in
Precarious Condition.
AN INHUMAN HUSBAND
Knocked Her Down and Kicked Her,
Breaking Three Ribs— Other
Offenders.
Steve Cliristian. a wife beater, was be
fore Judge Sullivan this morning and
pleaded guilty to the charge of assault.
His honor took the matter under advise
ment and will fix the wife beater's pun
ishment at tomorrow morning's session.
Mrs. Christian is at her home at No.
c35 East Park alley and is said to be in
a precarious condition from the inhuman
treatment sho received from her brutal
husband. Three ribs are broken, and she
is under a doc tor's care.
Too much whisky is said to have been
the cause of the assault. Christian, who
works at the Anaconda mine, came home
drunk yesterday. He was abusing the
children when his wife protested. Then
he turned on her, knocked her down and
kicked her repeatedly. Neighbors called
in Officer Byrne, and Christian was taken
to jail, where he said his name was Joint
Zagan. He furnished bonds and was
released. Dr. Hall, who is attending
Mrs. Christian, says she is in a very se
rious condition. Judge Sullivan set to
morrow for the passing of sentence in
order to investigate the case.
W. J. Whitely is another wife beater.
He was arrested last night, furnished
bonds and was released. He did not ap
pear in police court this morning and his
bond was declared forfeited.
Mrs. Whitely was present, however.
She told the judge that her husband had
choked her and threatened to kill her,
and that she did not propose to stand it
any longer. The judge assured her that
she would be protected and said that her
husband would not get off with a light
fine if he was arrested again.
Dick Sutton and J. W. Kenney, the pro
prietors of the Montana concert hall,
were arrested for neglecting to pay the
variety theater license. They pleaded
not guilty this morning and will be tried
September 5. Their bonds were fixed at
$100 each, which was furnished, Mr. Sut
ton depositing a check for $200 with the
city clerk.
Ella Fogg, Edith Sommers, May Jewell
and Lolo Lemley, charged with being in
mates of houses of prostitution, were
fined $5 each.
C. Shultz, whose buggy ran over a man
! and knocked him down on the corner of
i Park and Main streets on Saturday
1 afternoon, was fined $5 for fast driv
John Friar, the pious name of an im
pious individual, was lined $10 foi drink
ing too much fighting whisky.
Harry Doe and Charles Berger
fined $5 each for drunkenness.
RETURNED FROM IDAHO.
Deputy Marshal Dave Meiklejohn and
family returned yesterday from an out
ing in the Salmon river country, which
they enjoyed very much. While in that
country Mr. Meiklejohn believes he saw
the men who help up the Salmon City
stage a short time bufore tTie hold-up oc
curred. The men were in camp and
claimed to be returning from the Buffalo
Hump country. Mr. Meiklejohn fur
nished a good description of the men to
the officers who are searching for the
robbers.
AT THE HOTELS.
The Butte— W. E. Chamberlain, city;
A. Zuekerman, San Francisco; H. L.
Flint and wife, Chicago; A. H. Miller,
Mrs. A. H. Miller, city; C. R. Hobbs, Rev
enue: F. R. Pomeroy, Louisville: Eugene
W. Vest. St. Louis; A. W. McCune, Salt
Lake; II. Abraham, New York: E. G.
Rykert, Montreal; Frank Schoureek,
New York: C. N. Whitley, Helena; C. R.
Grazan, Belgrade; W. D. Westjhal, St.
Paul; Carl Greenhood, Missoula; T. E.
Gay, San Francisco; James Glass, Basin;
R. A. French, Helena; Kete M. Tarr, Os
borne, Mo.; H. G. Spalding, New York;
W. T. Thyng, Pullman, Wash.
The McDermott— W. C. White, Belt;
A. R. D. Peterson. San Francisco: Mrs.
Fischer Lumlohl, General Baron Konff,
Mrs. A. Riteher, General Count Revent
on, M. Beckman. A. Mayer, M. Hanz
hoher, M. Gerlach, Dr. Ptlueger, Ger
many; R. H. DeWeese, Kansas City; H.
C. Ayers, New York; B. L. Purnell, New
York; T. L. Martin, Helena; A. Kloster,
Chicago; W. C. Wyman, Springfield,
Mass.; B. P. Billings, Omaha: J. G. Bid
dleman, St. Paul; C. W. Hill, Harrisburg,
Pa.
THE MINING ENGINEERS.
There will be a meeting of mining engi
neers, members of the Institute of Mining
Engineers, and of the Montana Society,
and all interested in mining matters, at
room 616, Hennessy building, at S:30 p. m.
Tuesday evening, August 29, 1899.
The purpose of the meeting is to ar
range for the entertainment of a party
of eastern members of the American In
stitute of Mining Engineers, who are ex
pected in Butte September 19, and it has
been requested by Dr. Raymond, the sec
retary, that arrangements be made so
that the visiting members may have an
opportunity of seeing some of the mines
and smelters in Butte. A full attendance
at the meeting is earnestly requested.
THE DISCREET TRAVELER.
There is no way in which nice dis
cernment and good judgment can be dis
played to advantage as in the choice of
a railroad when arranging an inland jour
ney. People of good discernment, trav
eling between the Twin Citi- s and Mil
waukee and Chicago, use the .Milwaukee's
Pioneer Limited—the only perfect train
in the world.
BASE BALL.
Saturday's game of ball, between Poca
telo and the Boston & Montanas was as
fine an exhibition of ball playing as was
ever given in fills section of Montana, the
score standing after a hard fought bat
tle, 2 to 1 in favor of the visitors, and
the general verdict was that the Poca
tello's were the real thing. It was a pitch
er's pattle. King was in fine form and
pitched the game of 'his life, while Eu
banks, the visiting twirler, proved to be
speedy, of excellent control, and very
deceptive. The support was excellent.
In consequence 1,200 people went to
Athletic park yesterday afternoon antici
pating a good game and were disappoint
ed. McDonough was in the box for
Butte, and Gearhard for the visitors, and
it was the kind of a game that would
have disapointed even the "Gagtutn
Pups.'' Hits abounded, there being 35 in
all, about evenly divided between the
two pitchers.
The score was as follows:
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Pocatello........ 0 1 2 5 1 0 0 0 2—11
Boston & Montana.. ..4 2 2 2 4 0 1 0 3—18
Summary:
Two-basa hits—Slater, Boylan (2),
Grimes (2). Maye, Graham, Murphy (2).
Three-base hits—Rand, Graham. Deft on
bases—Pocatello, 5; B. & M .. 5. Struck
out—McDonough, 2; Gearhard, 3. Bases
on balls—Gearhard, 1: McDonough. 2.
Hit by pitcher—Gallagher (3), Donahue,
Sutton. Passed balls—Murphy, 3. Dou
ble plays—Subton to Perhain: Martin t>
Boylan to Datesman. Sacrifice hits—
Gallagher, Donahue, McDonough. Stolen
bases—Maye, Gallagher, Perham (.2),
Grimes. Umpire—Smith.
of
AT THE COURSING.
The results at the coursing park yes
terday were as follows:
White beat Fleur de Lis; Net beat Jes
sie H; Charley Prince beat Dandaloo;
Illawarra beat Don't Skip Me; Yantarra
beat Miss Walker.
Second round—White beat Illawarra;
Net beat Yantarra; Charley Prince a
bye.
Semi-finals — White beat Charley
Prince: Net a bye.
Final—Net beat White and won.
Saplings—Johnny Dugan beat Imp:
Jeffries a bye (One Spot drawn); Meader
a bye (Miss Glendyne drawn).
Second round—Dugan a bye; Jim Jef
fries beat Meader.
Johnny Dugan and Jim Jeffries divided,
Meader third.
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LABOR DAY COMMITTEES.
The Labor day committee held a meet
ing last night at which a marshal for the
dav and aides were appointed as follows:
Marshal, Dan McDonald; aides, F. J.
Pelletier, George Morehurt, Ed A. Pring
and William Holden. About 15 labor or
ganizations have responded to invita
tions to join the parade. There are about
32 labor organizations in this city, and it
is expected that nearly, if not all, will
turn out.
$20 sets of teeth $10. Dr, Wix *
little corner.
Washington Star: ''1 used to 'have a
great many theories about the way af
fairs ought to be conducted," said a
young man from Kansas...
''There is no denying it."
"Well, I give up. I don't go so far as
to say monopolies cannot be regulated
or suppressed. But 1 unhesitatingly
confess that 1 don't know how it's to be
done." „ ,
"You had any number of schemes'
"Yep. That was Before I realized what
an insidious and pervasive institution a
monopoly is. There is no use trying to
escape the terrible influence. One man
may break into a Utopia and by liis
heartless trickery upset the entire plan.
I am nroud of my state, but T must say
one of the meanest men I ever met lives
in Kansas."
"Politician?"
"No, sit . lie mingles among the guile
less and unsuspecting. Were you ever at
a husking bee?"
"Never."
"Then you don't know tlie custom
which gives the man who finds a red ear j
the right to kiss the prettiest girl. Thi;
man gave a husking bee ami lie sat uj
nigiits with a lantern for days lie
hand, going over the crop and peeling
down the husks to find red ears. When
the bee happened lie had all the capital
in a corner and lie smiled sardonically j
while the rest of us toiled on hour after ;
hour amid gathering disappointments,
in pursuit of a delusive hope, while he
whs apparently having all the luck. I
tell you, sir, there is more financiering j
ability in Kansas than you ever gav
the state credit for."
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A MONSTER FLOWER.
T'lio largest flower in tlie world is the
RafHns.ia Arnold! of Sumatra, its size is
fully three feet in diameter—about the
size' of a carriage wheel.
Mountain
Mont.
House uoal, Trail Creek,
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THE OCCASIONAL TRAVELER
Who takes, perhaps, not more than one
trip per year, and that a vacation trip,
should select a train that is celebrated
for its splendid appointments. A tiip
from St. Paul or Minneapolis to Mil
waukee or Chicago and return on the
Milwaukee's celebrated Pioneer Limited
is a true vacation in itself.
$20 sets of teeth $10. Dr. Wix. *
of
Baldness
Can be
Cured
just so long as there Is a particle
of vitality left in the hair roots.
The fact that the head is smooth
and shining is no positive proof
that the roots beneath arc dead
Deep down beneath the skin, hair
roots may yet exist, filled with
latent vitality, and all that is re
quired to develop them into a
beautiful head of liair is the faith
ful application of the proper agents.
Seven-—^
Sutherland Sisters'
preparations furnish the easiest,
surest and quickest way to ascer
tain if there is or is not latent life
beneath a head bare of hair. Why
not try them?
SOLD PY DRUGGISTS.
THE HEWS II BEEF
Washington, Aug. 27.—Maimed and cut
off from hope of a livelihood, Newton
Holman, until recently an enlisted man
of the United States army, serving in
Montana and'Wyoming, tried to kill him
self with a revolver at Cobb's hotel to
day. He had taken measures to make
the attempt successful by turning on the
gas in case the bullet missed the mark.
He failed in both cases, for the ball
glanced from his skull and he was dis
covered and sent to the hospital before
the gas had done its work. Holman,
while in the service, some weeks ago, had
his left log so badly injured in a railway
accident that amputation was necessary,
und on August 15 Holman came to Wash
ington to try to secure a pension. A few
days ago he learned that as his injury
was received out of the line of duty he
could not be pensioned.
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Salt Lake, Aug. 27.—A special to the |
Tribune from Monida, Mont., says: The
Yellowstone and Monida stage roach, I
which left here at 11 o'clock Friday morn
ing, was upset at Dwelles, about 60 miles
east from this place, at 10 o'clock the
same evening, killing one person and
wounding six others.
The dead: Mrs. Joseph Lippman, Salt j
Lake. Seriously injured: Joseph Lipp
man, Salt Lake. Others injured: H. J.
j Gottenberg, Denver, bruised: C. P. Miller,
Greensburg. Ind., very bad scalp wound,
back hurt: Mrs. C. P. Miller, Greensburg,
Ind., arm broken in two places, also hurt
about head and body, not serious; W. it.
Pleak, Greensburg, Ind.. Injured in head
and back; Mrs. W. R. Pleak, Greensburg,
Ind., injured in bead and back;--Vic
kery, dispatcher of ihe Union Pacifie rail
road at Denver, hip dislocated, bruised
about body and head. The only passen
ger on the stage who was not hurt is Mrs.
Morgan, sister of Dispatcher Vickery of
Denver. The accident occurred tit night
when the stage reached a point known as
the Divide. The stage struck a large
rock, turning the coach over, dashing
the occupant to the ground with a great
shock. After the overturning of the
coach the horses ran away and have not
yet been found.
Wallace, Ida.—Sergeant Crawford of
Company L, First cavalry, who escaped!
after letting tile eight men out of the
prison at Wardner Friday night, was ar
rested at Missoula, Mont., by the sheriff j
of Missoula county. He dressed in citi- j
gen's clothes, came to Wallace immedi
ately after the escape and took the early
train. A detachment of soldiers was sent |
from here this morning to bring him j
back. No trace of the escaped prisoners j
has yet been found. It is believed they j
are biding in the mountains, as it woulti 1
be exceedingly hazardous for them to try
to get out of the country and the sheriff j
with several deputies have squads of
men out in every direction searching for
them.
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NOTICE.
To the'Business Men of Butte:
Beware of fraudulent advertising
schemes. We have evidence that adver
tisements have been procured for a
Labor Day project, which is not endorsed
by the Silver Bow Trades and Labor
Assembly.
Payment for patronage secured by
fraud and misrepresentation cannot be
collected for. If you desire to patronize
a legitimate publication endorsed by this
assembly patronize Home Industry, the
only official Labor Day programme for
1899, solicitors for which carry creden
tials bearing our seal and official signa
tures.
(Signed) DAN MCDONALD,
President.
M. J. GEIGER,
Secretary.
Silver Bow Trades and Labor Assembly.
Mountain
Mont.
House Coal, Trail Creek,
THE PALACE OF SALT.
UTAH'S UNIQUE AND INTERESTING
PRODUCTION.
The salt palace in Salt Lake City, enn
i structed from salt crystals formed in the
I brine of Great Salt Lake, is the most
novel enterprise ever undertaken in the
west. The main building is a veritable
stal palace, and no uuoquato idea of
lfa ZZ pe n r8on"f tiew" of
is
Connected with the palace is a Midway
Plaisance, including Ilagenback's great
wild animal show and the fastest bicycle
The palace is lo
cated in the heart of Salt Lake City and
occupies about 20 acres of ground. The
only transcontinental line passing direct
ly through Salt Lake City is the Rio
Grande Western railway. Stop-over
privileges given at Salt Lake City on all
classes of through tickets. Tills line op
erales through Pullman palace and ordi
nary sleeping cars, free reclining chair
cars and a perfect dining car service. For
rates, maps and other information con
cerning the magnificent route, call on or
address W. C. M'BRIDE,
Gen. Agent, 47 East Broadway, Butte.
$20 sets of teeth $10. Dr. Wix. *
Beware of water-borne diseases, you
can now have pure water, even if you
cannot have pure air in Butte. We rent
you a Pasteur Family Filter placed over!
your sink for $1.25 a month. Butte water:
cannot be rivaled when sterilized with!
this filter. Spring water cannot b* com
pared with it, and is inconvenient and
more expensive. This is not a cheap
strainer but an absolute Germ Proof Fil
ter. Call on Pasteur Filter Co., 238 E
Park street. R. J. Bohlcr. Agent.
$20 sets of teeth $10. Dr. Wix.
ywiiimimiimnimi'iiiiimiiiiiiiiiiimiiiMmiiiiii|
J "Ceretana" |
p The Best Flour on Earth. A Boze- 5
5 man product of Hard Wheat. Any ;
; § quantity. _
j| Western Wagon & Grain
1 Incorporated Co. Inrorpnrnted
i 649
SOUTH ARIZONA STREETS
Butte, Montana.
^liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimmiiiiiiiiihiimiiiiiiiniiiiiR
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SOUTH WINDOW FULL OF THE
NEWEST STYLES
for Men
Tie : W Stiff Hat at $3.50
Has $5.00 Quality and Mode
Then There's the "Young" Block, Con
sidered Very Nobby
FEDORAS, SQUARE and ROUND TOPS
THE TASTIEST SOFT HATS
MA
granité
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♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦—♦♦♦—♦O*
She Cannot Sing
The Old Songs
When there're so many pretty and
musical new ones, if she is up-to
date, any more than an artist can
play on an old back number piano,
when the ones made by the Kimball
Company have such an exquisite
tone and great volume, as well as all
the perfections of the piano makers'
art. Make your home attractive
with a Kimball piano. We are sell
ing them at low prices, and on easy
payments.
ORTON BROS.
119 North Hain St., Butte.
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m\ P WHIP FREE
From now until January 1, 1900, we will give away
every lOtli Whip. Whichever Whip you pick out,
if it proves to lie the 10th one sold you got it for
nothing even if it is worth $10.00.
We make tills inducement to induce the bulk of the public to buy a
better grade of whips. For if they once get a good whip, even though it
costs more, it will prove itself t o be the cheapest in the end.
J. N. NEVILLS & CO.
Harness and Saddlery
Phone 544. 106 E. PARK ST
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MEN !
Read the Following and Then Consult the Western Hedical Dispensary
SPECIALISTS
And Be Permanently Cured.
Have you syphilitic poison In
your blood? Pimples and blotches
on face or body? Hair falling out?
Eyesight falling?
Do you have losses? Are you
losing strength? Is your memory
poor? Docs your back ache? Have
you ringing in the ears? Do you
tire easy?
We Make a New Man of You,
If you have stricture we cure it
by a new method.
Gonorrhoea, gleet, varicocele, piles
and all kidney and bladder diseases
permanently cured.
Men treated only. Consultation free.
Sunday the same. Permanently located.
107 E. Broadway, Butte, Mont. Dr. Wood, Consulting Physician.
Write if you can not call at his offices, and carefully describe your
symptoms and he will send you in plain envelope his scientific and honest
opinion of your case.
We Eradicate all Poisons and Hake
New Blood*
Don't delay, but avail yourself of
the proper treatment and be the
man you should be.
Office hours 9 a. m. to 9 p. m.
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THE FINEST LINE OF MECHANICS'
Tools and Hardware in the State.
MONTANA HARDWARE COMPANY
216 and 218 North Hain Street, Butte, Mont.

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