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Daily inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1881-1901, October 06, 1899, Image 8

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053057/1899-10-06/ed-1/seq-8/

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Dangerous to Delay
Insure your property in one of our
splendid companies.
Dangerous to Delay
Building if you intend to get in that
new home before winter.
Dangerous to Delay
Buy property now while it is still low
priced. Property will surely advance
before next year in this, the most
prosperous city on earth.
REAL ESTATE, LOANS, FIRE
INSURANCE.
(J() B 48 E.Broadw'y
BUTTE, MONTANA
Brobeck
Low prices are no novelty, but
low Grocery prices and high Gro
cery qualities are not so intimately
connected everywhere as they are
at Brobeok's.
FINE GRANULATED SUGAR ....
■ 7 lbs. $i.oo; too lbs. $6.oo
CENTURY BRAND SALMON, flat
cans ...............................
2 Cans 25c
SAUER KRAl'T, 3-lb cans .......
Per Can 20c
ROLLED OATS, best in the mar
ket ..............................
8 Pounds 25c
SCHEPP'S COCOANUT, fresh, best
on the market .....................
Per Pound 25c
PRICE'S or ROYAL BAKING
POWDER ........................
40c Can, 35c
CHOCOLATE CREAMS, the kind
you pay 33c for ...................
Per Pound 20c
You should try BROBECK'S
FLOUR. It costs less and makes
better and whiter bread than
others .............................
50 Pounds $1.15
OUR HOFFMAN HOUSE COF
FEE is the best ...................
Per lb. 35c, 3 lbs. $1.00
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135 West Broadway
Prompt Delivery. Tel. 359.
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MORE
BARGAINS
Today We Will Add to
the Bargains
In Our South Window.
We have a lot of beautiful Canteo
Plaques; they have been a little
slow at regular prices and we will
see what half price will do for them.
Then we have several dozen odd
Cups and Saucers, part of them
hand-painted, and all fine goods—
French, Austrian and Italian. They
will go at the same rate. Also, three
Onyx and Gilt Cabinets too beauti
ful to sacrifice, but we have no room
to show them. Decorated Premier
Egg Cups, regular price $4 per doz
en: will close at $2.50. The bar
gains in Royal Worcester, Copen
hagen, Lonhuda and Bohemian
Bric-a-Brac still on; and also In
fine Lamps, of which we have a very
few left.
Hight & Fairfield
JEWELERS
I Cor. Main and Broadw'y
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TRIED TO
SHUFFLE OFF
John Seymour Attempted Sui
cide This Morning.
SWALLOWED MORPHINE
And Strychnine—Was Nearly Dead
When Discovered—He Is
Very Low.
A man, whom no one seems to know,
and whose name, from a letter found on
his person, is supposed to be John Sey
mour, attempted suicide in the Fitchen
block this morning, and at a late hour
this afternoon the city physician was
hard at work in an endeavor to salve the
man's life. He swallowed a large quan
tity! of morphine and strychnine.
Seymour came to the city yesterday
Fitschen block, for which he paid. He
Fitchen block, for which lie paid. He
arose early and spent the morning hours
In the Fitschen saloon. He sat in a chair
and apparently went to sleep. Finally his
labored breathing attracted Mr. Fitseh
en's attention. He tried to arouse the
sleeper, but could not do so. Officer
Walsh was called In. The officer cor
rectly surmised that the man was suffer
ing from the effects of a drug of some
kind. Dr. Sheerin, the county physician,
who was also called in, pronounced it a
case of poisoning. Officer Walsh ordered
a hack and took Seymour to the city
jail and summoned Dr. Alexander.
„ , , , . ...
For several hours the city physician
worked over Seymour. A small bottle,
containing a few grains of morphine, had
been taken from his pocket and the
symptoms, in Dr. Aleander's opinion, in
dieated both morphine and strychnine
poisoning. A stomach pump was used.
after which Seymour was tilled up withiiy
several pints of black coffee. Every
method known was used to bring about
his revival, with but little success. At a
late hour this afternoon his pulse was
very weak.
In tlie pocket of the man's coat was
found an old letter, addressed to "Mr.
John Seymour, Garnet Montana." An
account book, much worn, in which the
name "John Seymour" appeared several
times, was also found. The letter was
from William Gallus, was dated January
7, 1898, and was written from Anaconda.
It stated that the writer had secured a
job in the quarries, but that work was
very scarce, and many men were being
turned away.
On Seymour's face are several fresh
wounds, evidently inflicted within the last
day or two. Just over his right eye. ami
at the end of the eyelash, is a cut to the
bone, and another slight wound is near
Ins mouth. He is a large man. being
nearly six feet in height, is dressed in
Seymour expired shortly after two
o'clock this afternoon. Coroner Julli-»n
, , . .
the rough clothing of a working man and
18 apparently ab out 40 yea rs of age.
SEYMOUR IS DEAD.
was at once notified and took charge of
the remains,
later.
An inquest will lie held
RED BOOT SHOE CO.
Under entirely new management, new
goods, new ideas, combined with all the
newest creations of artistic foot gear
selected from the most progressive shoe
manufacturers of the country. 0ur
eagle-eyed buyer, whom we keep con
stantly on the alert, is right in the midst
ng people of
Butte are always on the alert and ready
to buy the newest and latest creations
in fine shoes. We have therefore, bought
and placed on the market, for the benefit
of our patrons as well as ourselves all
the very latest and most stylish shoes
and slippers to be had. We do not fol
low. but lead. You can now get. right
at your own home, anything in the shoe
and slipper line that the mind's eve
might picture. Bring your feet with
you and we will do the rest. Why walk
the streets of Butte with unsatisfactory
shoes when you can get fitted to perfec
tion by expert feet fitters for less money
than you have been paying for shoes that
were not one-half so handsome?
RED BOOT SHOE CO.
BA LLOON ASCENSION.
Professor Nelson will make another one
of his thrilling balloon ascensions at
Meaderville Sunday at 4 o'clock.
ASSOCIATED CHARITIES.
The regular monthly meeting of the
Associated Charities was held at their
rooms in the Library building yesterday
afte
mon
pi
ternoon 1 The wcu'etary s report for the
„nth of ^eptetXr Us as foHow*
misions furnished 13 families, cloth
ing to 40 persons, employment found for
5 persons, 2 tons of coal given out. medi
pinp furnichod in 'I carps of
c.nc furnished in 3 cases or sickness
and a phyeician sent in 1 cause.
The flower mission made up and fis
tributed 291 bouquets among the sick ij,
the hospitals.
The sewing school which has been in
operation for the past three Saturday af
ternoons is proving a success, the aver
age attendance is 16 and new pupils are
[constantly being added to the class. All
materials are furnished by the associa
tion and the garment when made becomes
the property of the child who makes it.
The treasurer's report showed receipts,
$450.75 and expenditures $452.20.
The organization decided to issue a bi
ennial report in January.
The association is much in need of
partly worn clothing and will send for it
on receipt of a postal.
Vienna saloon, 119 South Main streqfc
Choice wines, liquors and cigars. Set
our new orchestrion, the only one In
haue, Albini Sisters, Proprietors,
LOCAL BRIEFS
J. O. Bates, tuner, Montana Music
company. Tel. 504. •
Burning of Manila, soldier's day: watch
for the date. *
Joseph L. Stewart, a miner, well known
throughout Montana, died at Silver Star
last Sunday.
Butte Stove Repair company for fix
tures and Hoipe Comfort ranges. 'Phone
629, 216 E. Park. •
Chemicals and assayers* supplies. Fair
Drug and Assay Supply company. US
East Park street. •
The remains of Mrs. John Clifford will
be shipped tonight to Waucon, Iowa, to
night for interment.
The Heilbronner cigar emporium, 23
East Broadway, can sell you cigars by
the box from 50 cents up. Call and
see. •
Jacob Zundel and Miss Susie Fisher
were united in marriage at the residence
of J. E. Noftsinger at 8:30 iast even
ing.
"Burt & Packard," the most durable
and stylish shoe made, selling at Gainer's
for a few days at $6.00 per pair. See
adv. *
The funeral of Mrs. Kate G. Toomey
will take place at the family residence.
No. 127 East Park street, tomorrow at 10
o'clock, proceeding to St. Patrick's
church, where solemn higli mass will be
celebrated.
Porter's famous "Burning of Manila."
inaugurated at the night shows of the
Minnesota State Fair midway between
Minneapolis and St. Paul, the week of
September 3rd. was pronounced by press
and public the most novel, complete and
enjoyable entertainment of the kind ever
seen in the northwest. *
ON A WORK TRAIN.
J. ANDERSON INSTANTLY KILLED
AND SEVERAL INJURED.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Burket of Pipe
stone Springs, who are visiting the city,
brought the details of an accident which
occurred yesterday at bridge No. 37, on
the Northern Pacific, by which J. Ander
son lost his life and J. O. Ambell was se
verely injured.
The Northern Pacific has been filling
in the trestles on the road between Butte
and Pipestone Springs. Yesterday one
: 0 f t j ie W ork-tralns was on the bridge
with a load of dirt and was backing down
j when the car containing the Ledgerwood
engine left the track and plunged down
! the embankment. Anderson and Ambell
| were on the car at the time. Anderson
was caught under the engine and instant
killed. Ambell sustained injuries to
his body. Several other men who were
[on the train escaped with light bruises,
Anderson had worked on the section
but a few days and little is known of
him. His body was brought to Wliite
j---
, , 7 ,
The copper market has been very steady
ft>r some weeks on the basis of I8V2C for
lake, and the producing interests are
j bolding their price at that figure. So far,
j the policy of the Amalgamated Copper
j company, which is also followed toy the
> large producers not in that combination,
has been remarkably successful in
steadying the market. No speculation ill
American copper is allowed, and sales
are only made for consumption or export,
t
in
free of duty.
Most of the copper that has been im
ported is in the form of Chili bars, which
arp sent to the Baltimore Copper Works
' to be refined °>' made into electrolytic,
MINES AND MINING
THE COPPER MARKET.
cirtr uuiy nuiuc iui utuisuiiipi iuii ur uxpui i
imports of copper do not seem to affec
this market, although the metal comes ii
nd much of it will probably be re
shipped to Europe after it has been re
fined. Further shipments of Chili bars
are expected from England to Baltimore
until the stock of from 8.000 to 10.000 tons
recently held at Swansea and Liverpool is
entirely forwarded to this country.
THE COPPER STOCKS.
______________
..... ,
The closing quotations of cojiper min
'" K shares to-day were as follows: Am
a >samated. *90 bid, *91 asked: Anaconda,
TIGER-POORMAN TROUBLES.
______
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^ was filed AVedncsday at Spo
kane b >' J - F - Forbis of Butte to stop the
transfer of the Tiger-Poorman mine, in
the r,,eur d'Alenes, to the Buffalo Hump
Development company. Mrs. Forbls al
lieges that he is about to be defrauded by
the sale lhe rn ' ne - He secured a tem
porary injunction to prevent the holding
a meeting Wednesday at 4 p. m. to
disincorporate the Tiger-Poorman com
P an >'- Mr. Forbis who owns 10,000 of
the 1-000.000 shares of the Tiger-Poorman
16
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company, alleges that stockholders own
ing 140,00 shares had no notice of the
proposed sale of the mine or of any of
the meetings connected with the sale,
says the Spokane Review.
The control of the Tiger-Poorman was
bought by Clark & Sweeney last July
from S. S. Glidden and others. Later the
company met in regular form and agreed
to sell the mine to the Buffalo Hump De
velopment company for $250.000. which is
at the rate which Clark & Sweeney arfl
said to have paid for the control. The
Buffalo Hump Development company is
the corporation formed by ('lark &
Sweeney to acquire the Big Buffalo mine.
I "Mr, Forbis has no cause for com
j plaint .'.„? al , r n
! *—* "We paid for all tne mine tne same
! in ?* " - * * *
P ncp lhat , we 0 ^ c ,
we do not see how we could nave dealt
more f a i r i y with the stockholders. Mr.
Forbis' holding is not worth more than
that of any other stockholder."
Concerning the Buffalo Hump Devel
opment company, Mr. Sweeney said that
his firm had bought the Tiger-Poorman
mine for the company to take the place
of the Big Buffalo, which did not turn
out as he had anticipated it would.
IN THE U. S. COURT.
The arguments in the suit of the Mon
tana Ore Purchasing company vs. E.
Hollins Morse and the Butte & Boston
company occupied the most of the day in
the United States court. The suit in
volves the question of a hase on 10 acres
of ground for dumping purposes, alleged
to have been given by Captain Painter,
the former manager of the Butte At Bos
ton, to the Montana Ore Purchasing com
pany.
THE RAILROADS
Much Construction Work Dur
ing Past Season.
2700 MILES OF TRACK
Laid This Year—Exceeds the Record
of Any Year Since
1893.
Chicago, Oct. 6 .—In the nine months
ended September 30 last, a round num
ber total of 2,700 miles of new railroad
•were laid in the United States. Of this
construction about 1,400 miles were built
in the months of July, August and Sep
tember, and there are strong reasons to
believe that the building this month will
surpass that of anv previous month of
the year. In an article dealing with the
railroad construction in the first nine
months of 1899, the Railway Age says:
A survey of the field shows that work
has progressed steadily since July 1, but
that not as much has been completed in
the way of completed roads as had been
anticipated. This does not indicate that
there has been any perceptible abandon
ment of the work undertaken during the
fore part of the year, but it means that
the prosperity of the country is so gen
eral and that the demand for labor and
material is so great that the railway
builders have found it impossible to se
cure sufficient men and supplies to carry
on the work with the speed desired.
From many sections of the country
comes the almost continual cry for work
men. Many hundreds of miles of road
are under construction at the present
time which cannot be completed this
year, owing, first, to the scarcity of labor,
and, second, to the inability to secure
rails and track supplies. The demand
for steel rails is so great that mills are
unable to fill orders for early delivery,
and it is likewise practically impossible
to secure relaying rails at any price.
For these reasons much work which had
been planned for completion this year
will have to be postponed until 1900 so
far as putting down the rails is con
cerned. although grading is being con
tinued with such forces as can be ob
tained.
The 2,700 miles of track laid thus far
during 1899 exceed the total mileage for
any year since 1892, with the exception
of 1893, when 3,080 miles were completed
As work is being pushed rapidly in many
sections of the country on both grading
and.track laying, more miles of track will
undoubtedly be laid during the month
of October than in any previous month
of the year.
Mr City 1er. Co.
14-lb cans Van Hounten's Cocoa.
20c
25c
25c
50c
40c
20c
25c
_ 25 c
457--E. Park Street- -457
Phone 432.
2 cans Corned Beef ..........
Lunch Tongue, per can ......
3 cans Fancy Oysters .........
16 -lb can Kuner's Mincemeat..
Heinz pint Olives, per bottle.
i
3 cans fancy New York Corn.
3 cans Fancy String Beans ..
WARM THINGS
BLANKETS. COMFORTS AND MATTRESSES
Montana weather is liable to say "More Covers" any (lav. Why not be in time instead of shivering a few
nights before providing these indispensable articles? Our stock is complete; our prices are right.
BLANKETS
Sheet Blankets, 10-4 size, each.................... 45 c Wool Blankets, 11-4 size, pair..................$ 1.50
All Wool North Star Blankets, white or colored, California Blankets, Cotton Warp and all wool,
per prir from...........................$ 4.00 up P er pair from............ .............$ 5.00 up
MATTRESSES
All Good Kinds; All Regular Sizes, or Special Sizes to Order, from........................$ 2.00 to $ 40.00
STOVES^
Fall line of New Heating Stoves now in.
A long line of up-to-date, correctly con
structed, modern Stoves at right prices.
Our Stoves are made with tit- "air
tight" feature, which assures the holding
of fire through the night with smaiUst -- —'ncc-jiv
_ amount of fuel and no trouble. , .A J
s This cut shows our popular -
Air Tiorbt Hnt Here is something entirely new.
Ail iigiu,nuiDi<iM çjrri poftlfOTnUC
SÄThtf «re " T e h^x u ItcLut'Un u lut E
, W'Jtl . tfaÿjpyqgj»* Hours. Fas same construction and all the ad
AL'Ja-"^ Ls,-*' »V . a. a> _ e vantages of a Steel Range, at one-third
I rices, S7*5® to $26.00. loss cost. Investigate it.
YOU OAU BUY OF US BY MAIL.
BROWNFIELD-CANTY CARPET CO.
HOUSE FURNISHERS FOR THE MASSES
48 to 54 West Park Street, Butte, Hont.
I UM
THE GIRLS OF LONG AGO.
(Boston Post.)
Reared In many a lonely cabin.
Learning but in nature's school:
Proudly pleating straw for pastime,
Perched upon a wooden stool.
Bounding through the dim old forests.
Finding where the wild flowers grow.
Dressed in homely linsey-woolsey,
Little girls of long ago.
Rowing up and down the river,
Singing, in a birch canoe;
Stick for dolls their only playthings,
Feet that seldom donned a shoe;
Watching mother at her spinning.
While she hummed some old tune low,
Crowding round the cheenr fireplace,
Little girls of long ago.
Mush and milk their daily diet,
Eaten from a pewter bowl;
Always happy and contented.
Dancing on from goal to goal,
Busy as the bees in summer,
Helping father oft to sow;
Gathering up the nuts and apples,
Little girls of long ago.
Indians everywhere about them,
Wolves at bedtime howling near.
Yet (hey did not know the meaning
Or the misery of fear.
Following their elder brothers.
While they hunt with gun and bow,
Brave as any elder settlers.
Little girls of long ago.
Building houses every autumn
with the brown leaves scattered round,
Taking tea with bits of china
Neatly laid upon the ground.
Sliding on the ponds in winter.
Trudging through the drifted snow
To some distant neighbor's quilting,
Little girls of long ago.
Snow-white grew their shining tresses,
And at last they sweely slept;
On their low mounds daisies blossomed,
Round and round the Ivy crept.
Many a line they've left to tell us,
Early pleasures, later woe,
Dead and gone, our great-grandmothers.
Little girls of long ago.
CHARMED BY MUSIC.
Sweet strains from a violin were instru
mental in preventing a highway robbery
early today and caused the subsequent
arrest of one of the alleged highwaymen,
who, under the name of William La
Monte, was fined $10 and costs by Justice
Sabath, says the Chicago News. Joseph
Klepach, 1543 West Sixty-seventh street,
was the complainant. He is a mechanic
and a violin student.
Klepach had been attending a parly at
Fisk and West Eighteenth streets, and
was returning to his home when he en
countered three young men at West
Twenty-second and Halstead streets.
"Throw up your hands," shouted one of
the trio, and they proceeded to search
him. When they reached his violin case
he told them to wait a minute and he
would play a tune for them.
The novel proposition appealed to the
highwaymen and his offer was accepted.
Klepach played as he had never played
before, and the robbers seemed hypno
tized. They did not move until they saw
two policemen from the Canalport avenue
police station, who were attracted by the
music and arrived in time to see the three
robbers dart down a side street and es
cape. LaMonte was traced as soon as
the officers learned what was the matter
and captured.
LITTLE. BUT DIGNIFIED.
Chicago Tribune: "Show me some of
your undershirts, please. Size 38."
"Yes, sir, but that's much too largo.
Size 30 would fit you a great deal better/'
"I am buying them. sir. bor my young
est son. Kindly attend to the particular
vocation for which you draw your sal
ary, and show me some 38s. all wool."
Wife (angrily)—"You are the most pro
voking man I ever met, John Smith. You
annoy me beyond endurance, and just
when I am doing everything I can to get
our daughter well established in life.
Now, what kind of music ought we to
have at the wedding ceremony?"
Husband (mildly)—"As Clara resembles
you in so many respects, my dear, I
think we ought to have martial music."
—World.
Friday. October 6
If you found an article missing
when checking up your order with
the purchase ticket, you would tell *
us about it, wouldn't you?
There is something that goes with
each order that's not down on the
ticket—it's "Satisfaction." If you
don't get it. will you kindly tell us?
We will appreciate it.
MONTANA APPLES.
Extra fine; box, $1.75; pound..$ .05
FANCY TOKAY GRAPES,
Basket ............. 30
FANCY BLUE PLUMS,
Basket ........................25
Crate ......................... 95
OUR DELICIOUS BUTTER,
2 pounds ...................... 55
STRICTLY FRESH EGGS,
Dozen ......................... 25
EXTRA QUALITY REFUGEE
STRING BEANS,
Dozen, $1.30; case, $2.50
2 cans ............. 25
SUGAR CORN,
Standard, 3 cans, 25c; extra
fancy. 2 for .................25
NEW PACK TOMATOES,
Can ..................... •....... 10
NICE FAT SALT MACKEREL
2 for .........................25
SALT HERRINGS (Imported),
C for............... .25
MUENSTER NEW CREAM
CHEESE.
Pound ...................... 20
DOUBLE CREAM CHEESE,
Pound ...............j.......... 20
FULL CREAM CHEESE,
Pound ......................... 13
SWISS CHEESE,
Pound ......................... 20
SUGAR,
Sap k .......................... 6.00
LARD.
5 lbs, 45c; lOtbs, 85c; 20 tbs .... 1.65
No. 24,427 wins the Sack of Quaker
Flour for Thursday.
I UTEY BROS
Cash Grocers.
47 W. Park St. Tel. 68
BUTTE, MONT.
Prompt Delivery. Kail Orders Solicited
*20 sets of teeth $10. Dr. Wix.
From September 30th to October 7th
the Great Northern Railway company
will sell tickets to
Chicago, at ..........$37.50
St. Louis, at ..........$35.00
J. E. DAWSON,
General Agent,
41 N. Main St.
$20 sets of teeth $10. Dr. Wix. •
CASTOR IÂ
For Infants and Children.
The Kind You Have Always Bough!
Bears the
Bt^ùî.ture of

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