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Daily inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1881-1901, October 18, 1899, Image 7

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MISSOULA NEWS
TIE GOLD S
It Has Ruined Much Fruit in
the Valley.
A YOUNG MAN'S DEATH
Ee Was Brought to This City Where
an Operation Was Performed But
it Was Too Late.
Missoula, October 17, 1899.
The cold weather has pla.yed havoc
With a number of orchards in this section
of the state. The trees have suffered
very little, but the apples in a number of
instances have been so badly frozen that
they cannot be used. Mrs. Hollenbeck
of the Rattlesnake valley is about the
greatest loser, almost all of her apples
being frozen.
Robert 'Marcum of Helmville was
brought to the city from Deer Lodge on
Monday evening on the Copper City, and
taken to to the Sisters' hospital. Dr. J.
H. Owings and N. J. Bielenberg accom
panied the boy. An operation was per
formed on him for appendicitis, but he
was Unable to recover, and died at 2
o'clock this morning. His remains were
prepared and taken back to Deer Lodge
on this morning's Copper City Limited.
he
so
The many friends of Joseph Boos gave
him a surprise party at his home, on the
Rattlesnake, on Monday evening, the oc
casion being his 64th birthday. About
a dozen couples were present and the
evening was very pleasantly spent. A
light luncheon was served at midnight,
after which the guests departed for their |
homes. Mr. Boos received a number of
useful presents.
Miss Ida Hogan, who has been in the
telephone office for a number of years,
lias resigned her position to accept a bet
ter one in the postoffice. She will have
charge of the delivery window. Miss
Hogan is well adapted for the position
and will give general satisfaction.
Coroner Hayes was called to St. Regis
this afternoon to look into the death of
a Swede. For several days he had been
on a spree, and rn attention was paid to
him. Sunday evening lie was found dead.
Coroner.Hayes wil hold an inquest over
the remains at St. Regis.
The trains are running very bad again
on the main line of the Northern Pacific.
The train from the east is running from
three to four hours late each day. The
cause is the heavy snow storms in the
Dakotas.
a
Eugene V. Debs will deliver a lecture
In this city on the 19th of this month.
The labor organizations are making ex
tensive preparations to entertain him.
He will speak at the Union opera house.
The funeral of Samuel J. Rowe took
place this morning from the Congrega
tional church and was largely attended.
The remains were buried in the Missoula
'Valley cemetery.
The delegates to the grand lodge T. O.
O. F., which meets in Helena this week,
left Sunday evening. Andrew Logan of
this city is grand patriarch of the Grand
Encampment.
Thomas Davey. a well known engineer
on the Northern Pacific, lias returned
from a year's
gion. He lias
the road.
,-isit in the Klondike re
resumed his position on
Rev. George Stewart of the Episcopal
church will hold services at Grantsdale
next Sunday morning at 11 o'clock, and
in the evening at Hamilton at 7:30.
The arrangement of the office of the
Missoula Mercantile company has been
changed. Tho present arrangement gives
the officers and clerks more room.
The. new home of C. M. Crutchfield, on
the South Side, is progressing nicely.
The building is under roof and will be
completed in a short time.
A new boy arrived at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. Albert Marion at Frenchtown
Sunday. He is a fine lad and is doing
nicely, as is his mother.
The Kearsarge quartz lode mining
claim lias been located by F. W. Wilson.
The claim is situated in the Woodman
gulch, on the Lo Lo pass.
Work has been started on the Cole
man flats and they will be finished before
the winter sets in.
A VALUABLE SHIRT.
Zenas Martin left for Texas yesterday
morning with a nice roll that contained 1
over $3.000. The story of that same bunch !
of money is a most remarkable one, says 1
the St. Louis Globe-Democrat. I
About three months ago Martin sold !
out bis business in a small Texas town I
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Gray Hairs
Can its Deferred
Premature gray hairs usually are the
effects of carelessness. If the scalp is kept
free of dandruff and properly nourished
and strengthened, gray hairs would be un
usual before the age of forty or forty-five.
There is no remedy in existence that will
restore color to gray hairs ; but the
Seven
Sutherland
Sieten'
Hair Grower and Scalp Cleaner, if applied
according to directions contained in each
package, will positively defer gray hairs
until nature compels their appearance.
There are today thousands of American
men and women who have revived the
dying energies of their hair through the
faithful use of these simple and natural
remedied
Sold by leading dealer*.
for $4,000 cash and came to this city. He
had three $1.000 bills, and nearly $1.000
more in greenbacks of other denomina
tions. After taking in the sights he pro
ceeded to load up on St. Louis tanglefoot.
Mr. Martin conceived the riot very bril
liant scheme of pasting the three $1.000
bills to the inside of his shirt front one
night when he started out. The merry
go-round lasted until dawn, and when
he reached his room, on Easton avenue,
the shirt was considerably soiled. After
changing his shirt lie rolled up the
soiled garment with other things
and proceeded to a laundry, taking a bot
tle or two on the way to brace up on.
These $1,000 bills were entirely forgotten,
so they went into the laundry to be done
up with shirts, collars and cuffs.
It was not until the next day that the
clouds passed out of Martin's brain, and
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then a species of insanity seized the un- j
fortunate man. He could remember |
everything but the name and location of
the laundry where ho left that valuable j
shirt. He was sure it was a Chinese j
washee house, but where he could not :
recall. The harder he tried to locate the j
| pecting you t
Chinese laundry the more muddled he
got. For two or three days he wandered
about, until lie landed at the Union sta
tion one night, got a ticket for Baltimore,
where he had relatives, and left the town
without notifying the police or anybody
else. He was taken seriously ill in the
Monumental City, and lingered for two
months in an almost hopeless condition.
Finally he recovered, when like a flash
came the memory of the laundry where
he had left his linen in St. Louis, and it
wasn't a Chinese laundry either. It was
Easton avenue, near Webster. As soon
as he could get there he came. On Sat
urday he quietly walked into the Home
laundry and made himself known.
"So you're Mr. Rartin, are you?" said
Theodore Klages, one of the proprietors
of the laundry. "Well. I'm glad to see
you. for I have been waiting a long time
for the man who papers the inside of his
shirt fronts with $1.00) bills.
Poor Martin nearly fainted when
Klages referred to those long lost bank
notes.
"So you found them," he gasped.
"Yes. I found three $1,000 bills pasted!
on your shirt bosom by the merest chance j
on earth. I consider you the luckiest man
alive. The bundle of linen was thrown in i
a pile with other things, and as I was
passing through the washroom I caught !
sight of your fortune through the open- j
ing in the back of the shirt. I steamed !
the bills loose and pul them away, ex- J
ill any moment. But as ]
you did not put in an appearance nor
leave any address I was greatly puzzled.
Last week my partner and l had de
termined to advertise for the man with
the $3,000 shirt, if something was not
heard from him by Sept. 1. Now you are
here, and I guess we can fix you up ail
right. You must renTçmber tiffs laundry
does not make a business of washing
$1.000 bills, so wo will have to return them
to you just as they came in, except that
they are detached from the shirt."
Martin explained all that happened to
him, and was eager to have the laundry
take at least $500 of his recovered fortune,
but the men of the laundry woufd not
accept the money.
"I'll never do such a foolish thing
again," said the man from Texas.
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BIG LOCOMOTIVE.
Pittsburg Times: "We're going to make
up a, half hour of lost time and haul No.
15 into Crestline, Ohio, on schedule time,"
said Patrick J. Morgan, as he climbed up
into the cab of engine No. 69 of the Grand
Rapids and Indiana railroad at Union
station last night. Train No. 15 lias al
ways been run as two sections from
Pittsburg to Chicago, the first section
leaving at 7 p. m., and the second a few
minutes later. The Pennsylvania com
pany. however, decided to test the mas
sive engine recently made at the Baldwin
Locomotive Works, Philadelphia, for the
Grand Rapids and Indiana Railroad, by
putting the two sections of No. 15 togeth
er through to Chicago. "Engineer Mor
gan is one of the best engineers that ever
pulled a throttle and t he right man to
handle that engine," said one railroad
man last night, as' the monster engine
steamed out of the train shed. Tho train
was composed of three mail cars, three
express cars, three day- coaches and
th ree Pullman sleepers. Herbert McDon
ald, who is next up for promotion, was
selected as fireman for the run from
Pittsburg to Crestline, and railroaders,
who watched the train pull out. express
ed the opinion that No. 15 would arrive
in Crestline on schedule time. It is said
that if the trial of last night proves a
success the Pennsylvania Company will
run No. 15 as one section with one of the
massive locomotives to haul her.
HOLLAND'S COURT PLATE STOLEN.
of
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C.
Washington Post: Police departments
on both sides of the Atlantic have receiv
ed a warning from the Dutch police to
be on the lookout for a royal official of
the name of Leblanc, who, until the mo
ment of his sudden disappearance and
departure for parts unknown, held the
office of chief custodian of the plate
closet of Queen Wilhelmina, of the Ne
therlands. He took flight on Septem
ber 20 last, and since then it has been
discovered that an immense quantity of
silver and silver-gift articles for use of
the table and for use of the toilet has
vanished, the intrinsic value of the ob
jerts stolen representing more than $1.
1 000,000. Holland is a small country, yet
! its Queen Is one of the very wealthiest
1 sovereigns in Europe, and has a collec
I tion of .plate, that is surpassed nowhere
! exc ept at Windsor and St. Petersburg.
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SUIT OVER THE WORD "HIS."
! Kansas City Journal: The ownership
of $4.000 worth of solvent notes hung up
i on a suit decided in the circuit epurt of j
j Mason last week. The heirs of Ezekiel j
j Evans, of Randolph county, sued Georg#? j
: Evans, of Macon, for a division of prop- j
erty. A writing introduced in evidence'
'recited that "George Evans has received 1
! these notes from Ezekiel Eva ns to be di- I
I viciv-d among his children." The defend
jar.t claimed and meant his own children, j
: while plaintiffs contended it' referred to j
j Ezekiel Evans' children. Much oral tes
I timon- was introduced to throw light on
tiie ambiguous «entende; The court
found for the plaintiffs, and the defend
ant appealed.
Liquid hydrogen, if produced on a
large scale, is suggested by W. de Fon
vielle a sof probable advantage in the
manufacture of vacuum electric lamps.
If a tube of air is dipped into the liquid
hydrogen, the air is all condensed as
snow, when the upper paît of the tube
may be sealed off by a blowpipe flame,
ami form« o bulb containing a Crookes
vacuum
HAMILTON NEWS
Hamilton, Mont., Oct. IS, 1899. j
The board of commissioners mot in *
special session yesterday to receive the
report of the census enumerator appoint
! ed in connection with the petition for tHe |
! incorporation of the town of Stevensville. !
The enumeration shows that the district
I proposed to be included in the incorpora
i tion has a population of 359 persons. The !
i petition and census enumeration being
in proper form and containing the neces- j
j sary names, tlie board ordered that an |
election be held to determine the quqsrtiontj
of incorporation
_ _____ Xov. 25, and J. TV]
j Brice, W. A. Wright, J. W. Ribblet and!;
| Charles Buck were appointed judgeis of-'i
the election. Some opposition hasv de- 1 ;
j veloped to incorporation on account of',
j the belief that it will increase taxation,
: but the principal ta>; payers nearly all
j favor it and those who have charge of ,
the matter say that incorporation Will j
carry by a large lghjority. .j
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The Georgia minstrels gave a very-poor
entertainment to a fair-sized hourie on
Friday evening. The gang comprising
the troupe can neither sing', dancgi riot
play, and how they can continue to- im
pose on a long suffering public is a ques- I
tion asked by many a person who parted i
with fifty cents for the purpose of being i
afflicted with their efforts. '
Captain Frank G. Higgins came up
from Missoula on Saturday and remained
in the city over Sunday. The captain
expects lo be in Butte on the arrival of
the First Montana volunteers and is de
sirous of having as many as possible of
the boys who were under his command.
The death warrant of Nels Peterson
was signed and issued yesterday and is
now in the hands of the sheriff. Peter
son's countrymen do not seem to be in
clned to assist him with money as long
as he does not desire it, and the sheriff's
office now expects to be required to per
from the unpleasant duties of the execu
tion.
Receipts for road work issued by the
county surveyor are making it necessary
for the country treasurer to explain the
intricacies of the road law to many tax
payers who hold such receipts. The at
torney general lias advised the county of
ficials that they should not bo received on
taxes as heretofore.
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Miss Krummell and Mrs. Walls left
mnmitiY fm- Wi-lfna In -l 1 1end
yesterday morning fo He ena to attend
the session of the giand lodge of ■
I Daughters of Rebekah, held in that city
this week. They went as delegate
the Hamilton lodge.
from
Mrs. A. E. Shappee, deputy- clerk of the
court, will leave the city on Thursday for
an absence of about three weeks. She
will visit friends in Sevensville, Missoula
and Superior during that time.
W. H. H. Dickinson of Missoula was
In the city on Saturday in the interests
of the Order of Washington, a patriotic
fraternal organization for which he is the
state organizer.
Postmaster Collins, who took the ren- I
sus of Stevensville, states that he missed !
several persons in the enumeration and j
that the actual population is 365. '
iof
George W. Dickinson of Stevensvill
was in the city yesterday and while her
bargained for the purchase of residence'!
property from L. J. Knapp In Stevens
' 1 e ' ' ;
The regular monthly meeting of the W. I
C. T. U. of this city will be held on Fri- I
day afternoon at the home of Mrs. Robert (
Harper on Third street.
Hon. George T. Baggs represented the j
town of Stevensville before the board of
commissioners yesterday in the matter of
incorporation.
A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. Dan
Thornburg, who reside on the West Fork,
last Saturday.
The Noble Dramatic company is play
ing a week's engagement at the opera
house.
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A BILLION OF CENTS.
New York Sun: The demand for one
ce-nt pieces is so great that the Philadel
phia mint is compelled to turn out nearly
4.000. 000 a month to keep up the supply.
There are at present something like
1.000. 000.000 cents ill circulation.
If you want to exchange a $100 bill for
cents you would get ten good, large bags
full of coppers. Nickel and copper coins
hae no mint marks, neither have coins i
issued at the Philadelphia mint. Collec
tors often pay high prices for coins bear- |
ing certain mint marks which otherwise ,
would not have been worth more than
their face value.
The first United States cents struck for
circulation bear the date of 1793. They
are of six varieties, and are valued 'at
$2.50 to $6.25. |
Very rare are the New York doubloons, j
coined in 1787, of which only five ' are !
known to exist. On one side
and curious coin is a picture
rising over
the legend,
f this rare !
of the. sun
mountain surrounded by 1
"Nova Kboraea Columbia j
a
the
as
Excelsior." Below is the name of the de- i
signer, "Brasher." The other side : has ,
the original form of the national motto,),
"Unum E Pluribus." There is an her
aldic eagle, on one wing of which are tliei
letters "E. B.", the designers initials.
Those coins are worth about $500. Tho
last one sold brought $527. It. had be
longed to an old Maryland family ever
since it was coined. :
The $5 gold piece of 1S22 is a rare coin.
At one time only two were said to |je in
existence; one :n the Philadelphia mint,,
the other in Boston, but the third was
picked up in a New York money
changer's shop a few years ago.
"I was afraid at first that it might
be a counterfeit." said the collector of
coins who happen'd to spy it.
The man was so delighted to secure It
that before leaving the shop he bought
several other coins which he didn't want.
He paid only $6 for it. _The same day he
received an offer of $250; later $450 was
offered by another gentleman; $600 by an
other one, but the gentleman, at last ac
counts, was holding it for $1,000.
One of the most sought after colonial
coins is the Highly copper. It was struck
in 1737 by Samuel Highly, who was a
physician and blacksmith at Granby,
Conn. He got the copper from a mine
near by and shaped the coin at his forge.
About nine years ago a silver shekel
was found in Texas, which dates back to
142 B. C. Its intrinsic value is 30 cents;
its market value $7.
The coins spoken of in the Bible are
shekels, which were of silver, the widow's
mite, the tribute penny and the "JuJeal
capta," the bronze coin struck by the
Emperor Titus to commemorate the de
traction of Jerusalem.
In Japan coins are generally of iron,
and in Siam they are chiefly of porcelain.
Whale's teeth form the coinage of the
Fi.ii islands. They are painted white and
red, the red teeth being worth about 20
times as much as the white. These teeth
are worn as a necklace instead of carried
in a pocket book.
The entire collection of coins and
medals in the British museum consists of
250.000 specimens, and is one of tlie finest
in the world. At the Philadelphia mint
is a good collection of American coins,
but tile governmt lit only allows $300 a
year to buy coins with. The British gov
ernment spends $5.000 a year for coins.
When differing organisms pass tliejr
entire existence together for mutual ad
vantage, the condition is regarded by
Prof. Marshall Ward as true symbiosis,
In oilier cases, one organism appears
to prepare the way for the other, as we
see in the conversion of starch into su
Rar by a mould and then into alcohol by
yeast, and for this kind of association
the name metabiosis is proposed. In
other companionships, one organism in-
jures the other, as is exemplified by many
parasites, this being what is known as
antibiosis.
$20 sets of teeth $10. Dr. Wix.
NOTICE FOR BIDS.
Notice is hereby given that a contract
will be let for grading Daly street from j
Main street west to B street, approxi
mutely 933 cubic yards; from the west
., f „ , , , .
s;de of B street to the west side of First
iLr'Ti 1 ' Mi Ppr »^ mate ^ ®' >0 <U ^°'
Wi lkrville, Montana, at so much per |
yard. Further information can be
cubic
obtained of B. Invernezzi. corner of Daly
and B streets. Bids to be presented to
the eity council or directed to (lie city
(•link not later than S o'clock p. m., Sut
ursday evening, Oct. 21. 1S99. The couth
elf reserves the lights to reject any and
all bids.
By order of tin- city council tiffs 11th
day of October, 1899.
J. E. BRINEY,
Mayor.
Attest;
R. L. CLINTO".
City Clerk.
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION.
! Land Office at Helena, Montana, Sep
tember 14, 1699.
j Nolice is hereby given that the follow
ing-named settler has filed notice of his
! intention to make final proof in support
! of his claim, and that said proof will be
! 111 ade before the cient of ,he district
| court n f Jefferson county, at Boulder,
i Montana, on October 20. 1899, viz: Albert
!
! A. Burton, for H. E. No. 6068, for the N.
E. V* Section 14. T. 4 N.. R. 7 W.. M. M.
He names the following witnesses to
prove his continuous residence upon and
cultivation of sa'd land, viz: R. N.
Rand, Peter Hanson, C. E. Kenman, Jos.
Page of Elk Park. Montana.
GEORGE D. GREENE,
Register.
:
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A.
! of
o'clock p. m., at the front door of the j
court house in the city of Butte, county (for
iof Silver Bow. state of Montana, the fol- j
al property, to-wit: j
(18) in blocll , s
SHERIFF'S SALE.
M. A. Lyons, plaintiff, vs. H. D. Fagan,
and George Willis, defendants.
To be sold at sheriff's sale, on the 4th j
day of November A. D. 1899, at two ,
described
lj0 f anmb( r ei „ M
; thirty (30) of the Clark addition to tii
ity of Butte, county of Silver Bow, state
of Montana, according to the official plat j
1 1
and
offu
survey
- of the
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thereof now on (fie in tie«
untv clerk and recorder of
Silver Bow county, Montana; together
with all tenements, hereditaments and
appurtenances thereunto belonging or in
anywise appertaining.
PATRICK H. REGAN,
Sin riff of Silver Bow County, Montana
By J. M. REYNOLDS,
Deputy Sheriff.
Dated Oct. 13th, A. D. 1899.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.
Estate of Anna E. Irvine, deceased.
Notice is hereby given by the under
signed .administrator of the estate of
Anna E. Irvine, deceased, to the credi
tors of and all persons having claims
again the said deceased, to exhibit them,
with tho necessary' vouchers, within four
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............. ....... .......................POTASH,
months after the first publication of this
notice, to the said administrator at the
office o' Roy S. Alley, rooms C, 6 and 7, |
in the county court house of Silver Bow
county, Montana, the same being the
place for the transaction of the business
of said estate, in the county of Silver
Bow, state of Montana.
SHELBY IRVINE,
Administrator of the Estate of Anna E.
Irvine, Deceased.
Dated Butte, Mont., this fifth day of
October, 1899.
EXECUTOR'S
SALE OF
TATE.
REAL ES
Notice Is hereby given, that in pursu
ance of an order of the district court of
th e second judicial district ot the state
of Montana, made on the eleventh day of
January, 1897, in the matter of the es
tate of Paul Davis, deceased, the under
! signed, the executor of the last will and
(testament of said deceased, will sell at
1 private sale to the hignest bidder foç
j cash, in lawful money of the United
i States, and subject to confirmation by
, said district court, on or after Thursday,
It
he
a
to
are
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St, Mary's Academy
Deer Lodge, Mont.
This institution offers to young ladle*
every advantage for home and school
comfort.
The course of study embraces all th«
branches of a perfect and refined edu
cation.
School term dates from the first Tues
day m September to th^ lost of June
For fur* ter information address the
SISTER SUPERIOR.
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A
A
for Infant« and Children.
The Kind You Haye Always Bought
BEARS THE SIGNATURE OP
In Use For Over 30 Years.
THC CtNTfcUR COMPANY, TT MUAAAY BTACCT. NKW VOWH CITY._
,, . . _ , , ,, ..
l * e , t m f h da3 [ ° f October, 1893, all the
r '« e ' ere f and estate of the
* VÎ tlm ®
of nis death, and all the right, title and
Interest that the said estate has. by op- 1
jeration of law or otherwise acquired!
other t , !an or in addition t0 that of tKe |
sai(J Paul Davis> deceased, at the time
of his death, in and to all that certain
lots, pieces, or parcels of land situate,
lying and being in the said county of
Silver Bow, state of Montana, and boun
ded and described as follows, to-wit:
An undivided one-fourtn (Vt.) interest
(in Bay Horse lode claim;
An undivided one-fourth V/i) Interest
in Corinthian lode claim;
An undivided one-sixth tl-6) Interest
'in the Eddy lode claim;
An undivided one-third (1-3) Interept
in the Litle Gern lode claim, and an undB
jvided six sixteenth (6-16j interest in the
Martha, lode claim.
That bids will be received at the office
of O. K. Lewis and company, No. 8 West
Park street, Butte, Montana.
Terms and conditions of sale, cash,
ten per cent of the purchase price to be
(paid on the day of sale, balance on con
firmation of sale by the district court.
Deed at expense of purchaser.
W. H. LEWIS,
(Executor of the Last Will and Testa
ment of Paul Davis, deceased.
Dated Sept. 20. 1899
IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE
Second Judicial District of the State
of Montana in and for the County of
Silver Bow
In the matter of the estate of Andrew
J. DeLashmutt, deceased. Notice of time
appointed for proving will. etc.
Pursuant to an order of said district
court, made on the 9th dav of September,
A. D. 1899. notice is hereby given that
Saturday, the 7th day of October, A. D.
1899. at 2 o'clock p m.. at the court house
! of Silver Bov.- county, m ttie City of Butte,
me
d
j istrator, of Silver Bow county, Montana,
(for the issuance to him of letters of ad
j ministration thereon with the will an
j nexed, at which time and place any per
, s °n interested may appear and contest
the same.
CLINTON C. CLARK, Clerk.
j Montana, has been appointed as the time
, and place for proving the will of said
j ^- ^-kUONARD. Deputy Clerk.
1 C. F. Kelley and M. D. Leehey, Attor
neys for Petitioner.
Dated September 9. 1899.
Cook !R,emedy Co.
HAS THE ONLY KNOWN CURE FOR
POISON
PRIMARY, SECONDARY or
TERTIARY BLOOD POISON
PERMANENTLY CURED IN 15
TO 35 DAYS. You can be treated
at home for the same price under
mmmmmmmmm—m «aine GUARANTY. If JOU prefer
to come hero we wTiwiontract to pay railroad fare and hotel bills asd
no charge If we fall to cure. If you have taken MERCURY, IODIDE
and «till have aches and P aln "* ]
mouth, SORE THROAT, PIMPLES, COPPER-COLORED SPOTS, LLCERS on
any part of the body, HAIR or EYEBROWS FALLING OUT, it la this BLOOD
| POISON that we GUARANTEE to cure. We «»licit the most OBSTINA^
/.«spa and CHALLENGE THE WORLD FOR A CASE WE CAN NOT CURE.
Çhls dUease lias always B AFFLEDT IIE SKILL OF THE MOST EMINENT
PHYSICIANS.
Several of our most prominent public men, Kings and Emperors of forelgu
lands have succumbed to this disease—even when under the treatment of the best
talent unlimited wealth of nations could employ, but we have a SECRET REM
EDY known only to ourselves. During FOURTEEN YEARS of our existence no
less than twenty different concerns have 6tarted up to Imitate our treatment,
prompted by our unprecedented success; today not one of them remains in busi
ness.
WE STAND ALONE WITHOUT A SINGLE SUCCESSFUL COMPETITOR.
THE COOK REMEDY CO. has permanently cured thousand» and fcM «
world wide reputation for speedy cures, honesty and integrity.
NO DECEPTION, NO FREE SAMPLE CATCH, NOR C. O. D. METHODS.
Advice and ABSOLUTE PROOFS OF CURESAND UNBROKEN PLEDGES
»ent sealed In plain packages on application. NO BRANCH OFFICES.
ONE MILLION DOLLARS BEHIND OUR GUARANTY.
Address COOK REMEDY CO.. 1927 Masonic Temple, Chicago. II
Corrected Schedule of Mails for Butte, Montana
From May 4th, 1890.
arrivals.
Trala.
Great Northern, c«*"» ................
! Great Northern, Local, east ....... 1
Great Northern, trom Anaconda....
Noithern Pacific, eaat via GarrUon.
! Northern Pacific, ®a»t ..............
Anaconda ...........................
! Oregon Short Line, south ..........
Northern Pacific, wc»t .............
Northern Pacific, weet ..............
Anaconda ..........................
Walkervill» ........... .............
Burlington .........................
Station No. 1, South Butt« .........
Station No. 1, South Butte .........
Depot.
Offleo.
10:30 p.
in.
11:00 p. m.
4:30 p.
m.
4:45 p. m.
9:35 a.
m.
9:45 a. m.
9:45 p.
m.
4:00 p. ID.
9:05 p.
m.
9:30 p. m.
12:50 p.
ra.
1:30 p. m.
1:05 a.
m.
1:30 a. m.
9:45 p.
m.
4:00 p. m.
9:10 p.
in.
9:30 p- m.
4:00 p.
m.
4:30 p. ra.
•a......
.»••
9:45 a. m.
..... ,,,
4:00 p. m.
...,.,
»es»
3:80 a. m.
. .......
....
9:80 p. m.
Distributed.
7:00 a. m.
5:30 p. m.
10:30 a. m.
6-00 p. nw
7:00 a. a.
2:30 p. m.
7:00 a. m,
5:00 p. a.
7:00 a. a.
5:00 p. m.
10:00 a. m.
4:30 p. a.
9:00 a. a.
5:00 p. m.
DEPARTURES.
Train. Clo»».
Nor. Pas., west.....3:40 a m.
Nor Pae., west.,... 9:00 p. m.
Anaconda, Local ... 9:00». ra
Anaconda, Local ..12:00 m.
G. N.. to Anaconda 4 00 p.m.
O. S. L.. south
j Helena, Local
G. N.. east ....
I Nor. Pec. east .
I Nor. Pac. asst, '
Garrison .....
1.00 p.
9:00 a. m.
7:30 p. m.
3:30 p. m.
Leave
Depot.
9:30 a. m
9:15 p. in
10:30 a. m.
1:05 p. m.
4:45 p. m
4:45 p. m
9:45 a. m
3:30 p. m.
3:20 p. m.
1:93 ». a. »:» a bp.
1
|
hervita
11
vurwnvuh.iTr,
LOST VIGOR*
AND MANHOOD
jures Impotency, K ig'ht Emissions and
w astin g diseases, all effects of self
abuse, or excess and indis
cretion. A nerve tonic and
blood builder. Brings the
pink glow to pale cheeks and
restores the fire oi youth.
By mail SOc pei iox;0 boxes
for $2.50; with a written guaran
tee to cure or refund the money.
9
NERVITA MEDICAL CO.
Minton A Jackson Sts.. CHICAGO« ILL.
For aal« by N«wbr*> Drug Co.. Buttât
Stoat.
'S)
t'-
Before and After.
MANHOOD
RESTORED
Prvaerlptioa
1959
Will quickly cure you of all nervous
diseases, such as lost manhood, paina
In the back, seminal emissions, ner
vous debility, unfitness to marry, ex
hausting drains, impotency and all
its horrors. A written guarantee and
money refunded if six boxes does not
effect a permanent cure. $1 per box,
six for $5, by mail securely sealed.
Manufactured by A. Augendre, Paris.
Address all mail to Newbro Drug C# v
Hole Agents, Butte, Montana.
UR.CHUNQ'â Celebrated
Herb Sanitarian
Guarantees to eurs SJl
diseases by means of hlff
famous Chinese medi
cines, never before lntr*«.
duced into this countrv.
He bas cured thousands
and can cure you. Advice free. 39 W«st
Gelena street. Butte, Most.
&
Leave
Train. Close. Depot.
Walkervills ........ 8:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m.
Station No. 1., S. B. ».'05 a. tu. 3:00 p. a»
Burlington A Gun
derson, respet'y .. 2:30 p.m. 12:30 p.m.
DISPATCH OF REGISTERED MAIL
Time of closing for Helen» »nA
Northern Pacific., east and
west, and all points on Great
Northern railway ............j « Î
Union Pacific and east ......... tM p- *•
Anaconda .....................9- *
Great Northern points, between
Butte and Helena ........,-..9»9 » ••

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