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Daily inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1881-1901, October 23, 1899, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053057/1899-10-23/ed-1/seq-7/

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UNCLE SAM'S ISLANDS
WONDERFUL RESOURCES OF THE
PHILIPPINES.
fast It pylon In Which the Possibilities
Aft* Geeat--Where the Population
Is Greatest—The Climate.
By Ineutenant Alex, I<aist.
The boys have had a hard time of it.
One man can play only one little part;
and I do not begrudge what small sacri
fices I was able to make, because I am
so thoroughly convinced from what I
have seen, that our country will count
the Philippines among its most valuable
acquisitions.
The Spaniards tell us the population is
8,000.000. Perhaps it is: but the Spaniards
are marvelously inaccurate in such things
Their maps were used by our generals
over there, because there were no others;
and it was quite common to find mount
ains where swamps were shown, and
jungles or lakes where highroads were
marked. Everybody has seen how the
Chinese hive themselves in thicker in their
houses than' passengers in a sleeping ear
on an excursion train and the Filipinos
crowd into a few rerters of population the
same way. Manila must have a popula
tion of 400.000, and when it is remembered
that there are numberless towns of 10,000
it can be readily comprehended that the
islands can be journeyed over for days
in some places without meeting a soul.
The Spaniards and the semi-civilized
Malays, whom Aguinaldo represents,
know only the lands bordering immedi
ately upon the coast. Beyond is terri
tory, certainly fertile and certainly
abounding in valuable timber, and per
haps treasuring gold, silver and diamonds
which are as unknown to them as the
riches of the great west were to us forty
years ago. There are miles after miles
of uncultivated land that will produce the
best sugar, tobacco and rice in the world,
within a days' travel from Manila or
rather an hour or two when Americans
have a chance to build railroads.
When we were at San Fernando, a Ger
man passed our lines one day. He had
a sugar plantation within the territory
controlled by the rebels. He told us that
a few years before he had received a
grant for about half a square of virgin
forest land, was gradually and slowly
cutting the timber for the market and
then planting the cleared ground with
sugar-cane, of which it produced an
abundant crop. This land was located
seven miles from Calulut, a station on
the railroad, about forty-five miles from
Manila, the metropolis of the archipe
lago. Think of it! Virgin forests within
fifty miles of a city larger than San Fran
cisco! That shows ho\^ the present in
habitants of the Philippines have been
living together in a few places and, from
laziness or other reasons, have left the
greater part of their country absolutely
unexplored.
An American or a European would find
j
!
!
I
So
Eclipse
All Other
Makes
m
The
Kimball
PIANOS and
ORGANS
They are Endorsed by the Most Eminent Artists
of flodern Times.
A handsome illustrated Catalogue is yours on application, together with
world's artists who endorse the Kimball instruments.
a beautiful photo-lithograph, of the
you can rent, and in a short time the instrument will be
your own.
LOOK AT THE ARRAY OF HIGH GRADE INSTRUMENTS ! ! g
KIHBALL, WEBER, HALLET & DAVIS, WHITNEY, HEINZE, WEISER
AND MANY OTHERS. j
WE HHVE THE FOLLOWING SPEOIAL AND UNQUESTIONABLE BARGAINS :
sz ÄÄÄÄÄ $225 | j&R- = t(ye <
One Splendid NevvEngland Piano, in perfect tune d* 1 ; at .............................................*F>I(j
and tone, oiginally cost $400.00 is yours at *P I Jll
,. ... . . . 1 One Decker & Son's Piano, new, original cost $650 <P'5^£'
One Kimball Piano, slightly used, but as good aso»|Or
new, cost $300.00 you may have for...............*J>l03 ' ' ........................................
One Whitney Piano nearly new, in good conditions'll P j ° n ° ,?* u . no ' ne " ' "'j 1 * 1 Mandolin, Guitar frltA
and finish, original cost $350.00................ «pZlj j anc * attachments, original cost $400.vO....
In addition to the above we have a varied assortment of second hand ORGANS at $10.00, $15.00 and $20.00 and $25.00
and upwards, all in good order, tune and tone, subject to your selection and approval.
REMEMBER THE PLACE
ORTON BROS.,
219 North Main Street.
Telephone 335
it easily possible to flourish in the Philip
pine climate, if he were only provided
with proper food and shelter and given
necessary rest; and these are things our
soldiers, owing to unavoidable conditions,
sometimes did not have.
The thermometer seldom rises over 90
degrees; at Fresno, California, 115 de
grees is common.
The country 's singularly free from the
diseases peculiar to the tropics. Yellow
fever is unknown, the bubonic plague
as well.
THE CHAPLIN'S WORK.
DURING WAR TIMES.
By Chaplain George C. Stull.
The Inter Mountain desires to know
what a chaplain's work is. It would be
difficult to say what it is not. Sam Small
says they are useless; so does Senator
Hannah but then they do not know just
what demands are made on a chaplain or
what he ought to do. A useful chaplain
should make himself an absolute nec
essity to the officers and men of his regi
ment. To do honest work means to do
unceasing hard work and I did not read
of either Mr. Small or Mr. Hannah doing
any of that kind. An efficient chaplain
should be a bureau of information, able
to answer every conceivable kind of
question, be in possession of an infinite
amount of courage, patience, good cheer,
willing to respond to every appeal, write
letters, furnish papers, pens, envelopes,
j shoestrings, abdominal bandages, sit be
! side the bed of a dying soldier in the
! hospital and receive the last message of
one on the battle field. He should keep
I keep anything from an image to a thou
sand dollars, buy checks, loan money,
cash drafts, run errands, distribute mail,
receive and be responseble for valuable
packages. He should trace missing prop
erty, prepare sermons, provide enter
tainments, be the custodian of all kicks
and the confidant of each man. He
should go to the guard house and to the
saloon and act as a steering committee
when a man is in danger of getting in
trouble.
That is enough is it? Oh. but that isn't
all—but you can imagine the rest.
Yes, I am in. full accord and touch with
the administration. We ought to keep
the Philippine Islands. They are all right.
We need them and they need us. The
better class of Filipinos will recognize
this when they awake from the lethargic
sleep that has overcome them for the
past three hundred years, and taste the
sweets of the American form of govern
ment. AVe will have no cause to regret
having made our acquisition. That is
enough? All right.
HOW IT HAPPENED.
The Inter Mountain had neither space
nor time to print cuts of all the Mon
tana war heroes, either officers or men. A
dozen of the officers who had been invit
ed to send in their photographs neglected
to comply in time. One is ('apt. Garden
hire, another is Lieutenant Lane and
another Adjutant Knowlton three splen
did courageous men whose example was
always an inspiration on the battle line.
Of the privates the faces of only part of
the Butte companies are given as groups
of the other companies could not be ob
tained in time. Bettet than photographs,
however, are the soldiers themselves and
thousands of people will cheer the Mon
tanas whether they came from Billings.
Great Falls, Dillon. Virginia City or any
other old place where heroes are bred
and born and sent to fight the battles of
the country and take proper care of Old
Glory.
"BILLY" FORBISDEAD.
A WELL KNOWN AND RESPECTED
BUTTE MAN BREATHES
HIS LAST.
W. P. Forbis, of Butte, died at Mis
soula at 1:30 o'clock yesterday morning.
His death was not unexpected as he ^iad
been ailing for several months and no
hoye had been held out for his recovery.
A few weeks ago he returned from Seat
tle to his residence in Missoula, but The
change made no improvement in his <$n
dition.
"Billy" Forbis, as he was known i^
Butte, was one of nature's nobleman and
his death will be received with sorrow
by thousands in Butte, who were inti*
mately acquainted with the deceased^
Mr. Forbis was born Jan. 12. 1853. in
Missouri, and in 1864 crossed the plains.
He arrived at Last Chance gulch but
only remained there a short time, com
ing to Butte where has has since resid
ed until about a year ago when he pur
chased a residence in Missoula. "He
located several claims in this vicinity,
notably the Niagara, from the sale of
which he realized considerable moffey,
He was married Jan. 28, 1884, to Miss
Lenora Jenks, daughter of Captain J. D.
jjenks of this city. The wife survives
him and also three children two boys
and one girl. John F, and James W.
Forbis the well known attorneys of Butte
are his brothers. His sister Mrs. Brown
lee resides in Spokane.
At his bedside during his last illness
were Colonel J. D. Jenks and William
Fitzgerald of this city.
ANACONDA WON.
Anaconda won yesterday's game of
football over the Montana Athletic club.
The game was unquestionably the best
that has been played in Butte since the
days when the game was in its glory;
a good exmibition of nervy playing. In
Die first half the Butte team outplayed
the visitors in every particular making a
touch-down early, but failing io kick
a goal. When time was called for tho
intermission- the Butte's had the ball
within a few feet of the line.
Anaconda made two touch-downs in
the second half. The second touch
down was made, after a fierce struggle
just before time was called the score
standing 10 to 5.
Of the home team the playing of Cap
tain Benson, Trilby Davis, Bill Sader
and Mickey Harrington was particularly
good.
100,000 envelopes just received at the
P. O. News Stand. Best quality, prices
right. *
Vienna saloon, 119 South Main streel.
Choice wines.- liquors and cigars. See
our new orchestrion, the only one in
Butte. Albini Sisters, Proprietors,
$20 sets of teeth $10. Dr. Wix.
Members of the Reception Committee to Whose Efforts Is Due Much of the Success
of the Celebration in Honor of the Returning Soldiers.
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Not a $10.00 Suit
But a Suit for $10.00
Y OU CAN GO into any clothing store and
buy a Ten Dollar Cheviot Suit; all the
stores keep them, but you'll get just
what you ask for—a Ten Dollar Suit.
Now we bring into view this morning a large
number of All Wool Black Cheviot Suits and
fancy Worsted Suits that have just been
FINISHED TO OUR ORDER
And which we propose to sell at Ten Dollars
as an illustration of what we can do in the
way of a special offering. The Suits are
SINGLE BREASTED, DOUBLE BREASTED .»d FROCK
Styles and the assortment is complete, even to the specially short
sizes. If you have bought a suit as well made and as nicely finished
as one of these for $3.00 or $4.00 more
than our orice of $10.00, you received
your money's worth, which is the same as
saying that in buying
This Suit at This Price
You received more. Such is the plain un
varnished fact.
The Park Street Clothier,
45 E. Park St.

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