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Daily inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1881-1901, November 17, 1899, Image 4

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053057/1899-11-17/ed-1/seq-4/

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Prices Every Day
Till Stock is Reduced.
WHITE POTATOES, per hundred. .$1.20
LARGE RED POTATOES, splendid
cookers........................
ONIONS, per hundred .............
BEETS, fancy red. per hundred....
LAUGE EOXES FANCY RED AP
PLES............
FORTY-NINE POUND
FORTY-NINE POUND
BREAD FLOUR.......
TWO SUGAR BOWLS
FRENCH MUSTARD...
ONE GALLON HONEY
Get our prices on hay.
1.73
SACK
65
SACK
85
FINEST
25
DRIPS
45
SYRUP
15
COOK'S
331 East Park Street, Butte
Ursuline Convent
MOUNT ANGELA
ST. PETER P. 0., MONTANA.
Fourteen miles west of the nearest sta
tion. CASCADE, on the MONTANA
CENTRAL RAILROAD. Extensive
grounds, fine mountain scenery and an
exceptionally healthful climate. English
and classical courses. Art, Music and
the Modern Languages. Terms moder
ate. Telephone connections. By tele
phoning to thf Convent a conveyance
will meet pupils at Cascade.
St. Joseph's Academy, a separate
Boarding Schooi for ticys under 14 years.
Address
THE MOTHER SUPERIOR.
«V
This cut represents two little ones
warming themselves by the heat of a
GAS HEATING STOVE. These stoves
ftre the cleanliest stove known, and is
efficient and cheap to operate. We sell
these stoves only. We make special
rates for gas for fuel, and also for large
light consumers.
BUTTE GAS LIGHT AND
COKE COMPANY.
48 EAST BROADWAY, BUTTE
WE BUY
p e!l, Repair. Store. Pack and Ship, Rent
• " Exchange Furniture with you.
Butte Exch'g. Furnilure Co.
J. CHAUVIN. Agen:.
42 W. Broadway,Butte
MjCalei
And Oyster Parlors.
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♦ The First Class Restaurant of*
A ......... w Y
ujo city. BEST OF MEALS?
♦ 1 5 C ents and upward. X
J F nvfcte Rooms for Ladies *
♦ - !
 Also Dealers In ?
J Chinese and Japanese*
* Fancy Goods J
♦ Best. Teas, lire Silks, Chinaware Etc*
♦ S7 W. Park St., Butte. f
* HUM FAY. Prop, and Mgr^
Huie Pock & Co.,
Merchant Tailors
Chines« and Japanese Fancy
Gcods. Ladies' and Gentle
men':- Underwear made to or
der- Teas, Chinaware, Etc
227 S. Main Street, Butte
uV
LR.CHUNG'S Celebrated
H*rb Sanitarium
Guarantees to euro an
diseases by means of hl>l
tflmous Chinese luedi
eines, never before intr* -
dured Into thi3 countr».
He has cured thousand*
and can curs you. Advice free. 39 W«at
finden* Street Hulte, Most.
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Used by the British Was
Attacked By Boers.
AM) II WAS DERAILED
It Was a Veitable Trap That the
British Ran Into And Their Loss in
Kiiled, Wounded and Missing: Was
Very Large.
London, Nov. IT, 5 a. m.—Misfortune
steadfastly pursues British employment
uL' armored trains, the fascination for
which has given the Boers their tlrst
and latest victories. On this last oc
i elision, the British seem to have walked
! into a deliberate trap, with the result
j that, aecriling to the best accounts, 90
! men are either killed, wounded or iniss
! iug. Of these the fusileers claim öü
j and the Durban infantry 40. It is be
jlkved that a few escaped and the oth
I ers are prisoners in the hands of the
: Boris. Many of the wounded were
1 brought back on the locomotive and
tender of the armored train. Captain
Haldane, of the Gordon highlanders,
was attached to the fusileers and other
I officers were with them. The list of
I casualties is awaited with great anxie
; ty. In time of trouble Lieutenant Wins
I ton Churchill has proved himself more
! a soldier than a correspondent and his
: gallantry is highly praised on ail sides.
The rumor of the death of General
j Joubert is discredited. It is under
! stood tnat the war office has news that
! he is still directing affairs. It is also
! rumored from Pietermaritzburg that
the Boer losses at Ladysmith on Thurs
j day were heavy and included General
Lucas Meyer, who was either killed or
I wounded. The report as to General
Joubert probably arose from the fact
that his wife has left the Boer camp at
Ladysmith for the Free State.
According to the Pietermaritzburg
correspondent of the London Outlook,
rumors are current in the Natal capital
that the Boers contemplate a retreat.
It is needless, however, to attach im
portance to such reports, which are
spread in all probability in the hope of
luring General White, if possible, to
abandon his defensive attitude. Similar
rumors are current regarding the Boers
at Mafeking and are spread industri
usiy by native spies.
SpediaP dispatdhes from Lorenzo
Marques say that the Transvaal gove
eminent is exercising a severe censor
ship over all war news and will not al
low newspapers to leave the country.
One correspondent says the Boers are
hurrying new commandos to Ladysmith
and the declaring that the place mu d
fall speedily in order to liberate their
forces so that these may go to meet
General Buller's advance.
The latest dispatches from Estcourt i
regarding the armored train engagement
say that the train was capsized by an
explosion, presumably dynamite. The
entire train returned to Estcourt with two
dead fusileers and the following wound
ed: Captain Wylie, three non-cimmis
stoned officers and nine privates, all be
longing to the Durban volunteers. An
other Estcourt correspondent says a
Buer contingent of 300 men came south
of Frere on Wednesday and two com
panies of mounted troops, imperial light
horse and Natal carbineers engaged
them eight miles from Estcourt. The
Boers occupied a strong position on a
kopje. The carbineers worked around
on their right and drove the enemy
back, whereupon the imperial light horse
opened a brisk lire at medium range
killing several. On>' man of the imper
ial light horse was wounded.
The West Yorkshire regiment, the
Prince of Wales' Own, commanded by
Colonel Kitchener, brother of Lord Kit
chener of Khartoum, has arrived at Est
court from Durban. The troops there
"sleep in their boots" and the utmost
vigilance is maintained and it is rum
ored that some important movement is
imminent.
According to a special dispatch from
Lorenzo Marques, General Lucas Meyer
has gone to Pretoria for his health.
However, a difference in opinion exists
among Lhe commanders. The Boer mil
itary council wants th
elsewhere, but General
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: that Ladysmith must fall first.
: The postal authorities at Dm
i and inspect all letters from
- bay.
---
Estcourt. Natal, Nov. 16.—-An armored
' 71" baving ? n boar<1 half a company
Durban volunteers and half a com
pany of Dublin fusileers steamed to Chi
velle early this morning. On its return
it was shelled by Boer artillery placed in
cd: Captain Wylie, three non-commis
four positions. Two trucks in front
over. While the train was thus helpless
the Durbans . and Dublins faced the
Boers in skirmishing order and the Boers
poured shot and shell Into the crippled
train. The derailed trucks were with
great difficulty r -moved and the line was
cleared when the engine and tender
steamed back. During this juncture
Lieutenant Winston Churchill of the
fourth hussars, son of the late Lord
Randolph Churchill, displayed much
courage as also did the driver and fire
man. It is feared the Dublins and Dur
bans fared badly. The Red Cross party
has gone out. (Foregoing is the same
affair to which a special dispatch from
Pietermaritzburg refers.)
army moved
Joubert inists
j
an open
Delagoa 1
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Durban, Natal, Nov. 16.—The Natal
i Mercury, describing the engagement
says: The enemy apparently opened
fire with a Maxim and two nine-pound
ers, getting the range accurately. The
fire was so severe that telegraph wires
and poles were destroyed. Their guns
: were posted on a kopje covered with
I-brushwood, and their sharpshooters
j were hidden behind boulders. The Dub
! lins and volunteers, fighting an equal
I battle, thrice drove the enemy hack,
i but the fierceness of the rifle and big
gun fire was too much for the brave
little party, which was weakened at the
A POINTER FOR YOU
RAMONA Teas and Coffees
And get the best the market affords. All grocers.
outset by the overturning of the trucks,
hin ting several.
Lieutenant Churchill's bravery and
coolness were magnificent. Encouraged
by him all worked like heroes in clearing
the Une to enable tiie engine and tender
to pass.
Later details show that a heavy rain
and mist compelled a cessation of tiring.
Lieutenant Churchill bravely carried
the wounded to the rear under tire. While
the Boers were destroying the train,
their scouts pushed in and exchanged
shots with the British pickets a few
miles from Estcourt. It appears that
the Boers were in ambush. As soon as
the train passed up they emerged from
cover and dislodged the sleeper bolts.
Estcourt, Natal, Wednesday, Nov. 15,
9:30 p. m.—At 6 o'clock this evening the !
Red Cross trains returned. Dr. Bristoe ]
reported that on meeting the Boer pa- ■
trol he was halted and asked what he '
wanted. He replied that he had come
with ihc train to remove the killed and \
wounded. The Boers told him to make
his request in writing and Dr. Bristoe !
complied. After waiting for two hours I
another Boer came and informed Dr. !
Bristoe that as General Joubert was very I
far away, no answer to the request could j
be furnished until to-morrow morning, j
The Boer said that if Dr. Bristoe would |
then return with a white flag lv could !
count upon a reply from General Jou
bert. Dr. Bristoe inquired whether
there were many wounded. The Boer '
replied that he had heard there were
about seven. He declined to give in
formation regarding Lieutenant Wins
ton Churchill. Ti has rained all day
and is still raining. i
Astronomers Mistaken.
New York, Nov. 17.—A speaal dispat
to the Journal and Advertiser fre
Washington says: "The shower of Leo
ids will not occur this season. The bill
liant spectacle has been announced one
year too soon." This announcement
has just been made by Dr. L. J. See,
one of the most advanced astronomers
in the government service. "Astronom
ical calculations have not erred as to the
periodicity of the Leonids," said Dr. See
to the Journal, "but the generally ac
cepted conclusion as to the lime it take,,
the Leonids to pass the earth's orbit
has been wrong. After the most fate
ful observations male with the best
instruments in the service of the govern
ment and after the most unerring cal
culations in strict conformity to astro
nomical laws I am thoroughly con
vinced that the period of passage is two
years instead of one year, as heretofore
believed. The Leonids have been within j
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in ,
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the earth's orbit for a year nbw, and
will remain with us for another 12
months. The meteoric shower has not
been as heavy this time as there was
good scientific reason for believing it
would be. That is because we have not
yet struck tiie thick part of the trail.
. By my calculations, this collision will
; occur in the middle of November, 1900.
Then the resultant display of burning
I meteors will be as brilliant as the one
! observed by Humboldt in Venezuela in
1799. 'The present visitation is a coun
terpart of that in 1863. At that time
they were displayed in two years, that
of I-S62 being about as feeble as the
present has been, and that of the suc
ceeding year being nearly as striking as
that recorded by Humboldt."
American Capital Interested
New York, Nov. 17.—American -capital :
to the amount of $3,000,000 has become in- !
terested In Venezuela banking, a con- \
cession having been granted to George ;
W. Upton of Ohio for the organization o!
a national banking system which will j
practically control the finances of the i
country. Mr. Upton with ids wife reach
ed New York City on the Red D line
steamer Philadelphia.
Sonora Andrade, who was met at San
Juan, Porto Rico, by her husband, tic
deposed president of Venezuela, who in
tends to make his home in that island,
was also on the Philadelphia.
Mr. Upton is enthusiastic over Vene
zuela. He predicts a long peace for the
country and declares that there is no
likelihood of war with Colombia.
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Huntington in Control.
San Franseiseo Nov. 17.—The Exam
iner says: Collis P. Huntington is to-day
in full control of three-fourths of the
property of the Southern Pacific com
pany and its allied corporation, liie Pa
cific Improvement company. With tue
help of banking syndicates headed by the
Speyers of New York and London, he
has bought out the Crocker and Stanford
interests, each amounting to about one
j fourth of the stock. With his own
fourth, that gives him three-fourths
1 the whole. The remainin'.
j interest belongs to the Hopkins-Searles
! estate. The Speyers hold in their pos
session the Crocker and Stanford securi
ties for the present, Huntington having
an ironclad option for their final trans
fer to him.
-fourth :
Those little kernels in the
neck ! Has your child ever
had them? Youknowsome
times they swell, become
painful, soften, and end in
a scar. Give such a child
ScSfH dtmiliton.
just as soon as the kernels
appear. The little swell
ings will grow less and less
and soon will disappear alto
gether. Continue the Emul
sion until the child has good
flesh and a healthy color.
50c. and $r.oo, all druggists.
SCOTT C lïOWX'E, Chemists, New York.
Has Been Placed in Dry
Dock For Time Being.
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PROPOSED OCEAN TRIP
It Is Plot Yet Definitely Decided as to
Whether She Will Cress the Ocean
to Take Part in the Foreign Yacht
Races,
New York, Nov. 16.—The Tribune says:
The victorious cup defender Columbia
has been hauled out on the ways of John
Hawkins, at City island. This, however,
does not settle the question as to whether
or not the famous Herreshoff craft will
cross the ocean to contest in Mediterran
ean and British yacht races. Mr. Iselin
himself dots not know for certainty what
settled'
j will
be done. He
and
Mrs.
Iselin
will
j soon
i start, for the
o 1 h e
r side
and
there !
1 are
many things to
cor.
aider
before
any j
, or de
r will issue to
Plat
■e th.
• Co lu
moia :
und^
*r cruising rig.
At
presi
?nt thi
e in- j
tentions are simply to put the cup winner
in a good safe place on the land and
leave her there until wanted.
Mr. Iselin came from All View, New
Rochelle, to City island to look the boat
over after she was hauled out and to give
some directions in regard to those men
who were still employed on the boat, two
of whom were paid off yesterday. When
seen at the Hawkins yard he said:
"I have had all the yachting I want
long tin
He did not. however, say that he had !
positively made up his mind to leave the i
< 'oiutnbia where she is until the next Am- j
erican yachting season and the real of the i
n.venation showed that this is not yet |
Among- the men still employed |
on the Columbia there is a difference of :
opinion as to the future movements of
the yacht. One man who wore the uni- ;
form of the crew said: '
"This boat is going across the ocean. |
I know what she is going to do and you !
need not remain any longer in doubt, i
The Columbia will leave here in January j
to cross to tiie other side. This is the j
present intention and this is what will]
be done."
Another man, who said he had been I
paid off. gave the impression that the j
yacht would remain at Hawkins yards, j
so that r.o risks' would be taken with her j
until she is required again in these
waters. The contradictory and equally |
positive statements suggest that if a new ;
challenger comes from England, or else
where, for a cup race next year, tlic !
Columbia will remain w here she is. but I
that if no challenge comes in before ]
Jan. 1 she will put on a ketnch rig and!
cross in time for the Riveria racing. It' |
no challenge- comes before Jan. 1 the;
New York Yacht club need not lessen the
regular 10 months' notice and thus the !
race could not be sailed within the sea- |
son, under the last deed of gift, so that !
after the second or third week in De- 1
cember the Columbia may prepare to sail
to the other side, knowing that she will ■
not be required here next season. Com
modore J. P. Morgan lias just paid all ;
the year's expenses of the Defender.
The Election Frauds.
Philadelphia, Nov. 17.—Samuel Salton,
deputy coroner of this city: Joseph G.
Rodgers, lieutenant of the capitol police,
Washington: and Clarence Messer, em
ployed in the copying division of the con
gressional library, have been held in
$1.800 bail for trial on the charge of con
spiring to make fraudulent election re
turns in this city. The arrest of the three
men was the outcome of testimony ad
duced at the hearing last week of sev
eral residents of Washington who had
been arrested here on a similar charge.
On that occasion, it was testified that a
party of alleged lepeaters numbering
about 14 had been brought to this city
from Washington by Lieutenant Rodgers,
: Two of these, George Kirkland and W. H.
Cook, impersonated election officers in the
thirteenth division of the seventh ward
and assisted in the alleged falsifying of
the returns and the stuffing of the ballots
while tiie others, it was testified, were
employed as repeaters. Kirkland testi
fied against his companions, saying that
he came here at the instigation of a
newspaper to participate in and expose
tlie fraud.
To Succeed Dr. Hal!.
Now York, Nov. 17.—The Tribune says:
The pulpit committee of the Fifth avenue
Presbyterian church met in the church
last evening. A subcommittee w as select
ed to go to St. Louis and hear the Rev.
Dr. Sneed preach there next Sunday.
This, it was said, would probably mean
the selection of Dr. Sneed to succeed the
late Dr. Hall.
NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that on and
after tiffs date. Mr. J. Anson Harrington
will be the sole representative of the
International Correspondence Schools, of
Scranton, Pa., for Butte. Aanconda and
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vicinity, with full authority to accept en
rollments and collect installments
moneys due said school.
(Signed) II. H. JAMES,
Inspector.
Butte, Mont., Nov. Il, ISM.
BUTTE LODGE NO. £2. A. F. &
A. M. Regular meeting In Ma
sonic Temple, second and fourth
Tuesdays of each month. Sojourning
brethren cordially invited to attend.
MLVER BOW LODGE NO. 48.
A. F. & A. M. Regular meeting In
Masonic Temple, second and
fourth Thursdays of each month. So
journing brethren cordially Invited to at
tend. Dan Yancey, secretary
A
HAS YOUR ADVERTISEMENT OF
LoÎÏ Fnn FOR RENT ' BOARD FOÎl BOARDRES, HOUSES AND
this maTly ° th6r WantS ° f your da!,y Iife been mentioned in
urn want column? 10, 15 or 25 cents will do It.
W p guarantee you an answer.
EMPLOYMEWi
WANTED-A FIRST-CLASS STENOG
rapher. Address P. O. Box 213, Butte,
Mont.
WANTED—A GIRL TO DO HOUSE
work. A pply at inter Mountain office.
WANTED—ACTIVE MAN FOR THIS
community. $15 weekly. State age
formed employement. Gloeb Co.,
Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa.
^BUSINESS CHANCES.
for SALE—5 ROOMED FRAME
nouse on West Woolman street, rents
for $25.00 a month, lot 30x100 for $1,200.
Case & Holmes, 26 East Broadway.
FOR SALE—BUSINESS PROPERTY
on East Park street, store and 4 roomed
house rented for $55 a month for $2.250.
Case & Holmes, 28 East Broadway.
FOR SALE—4 ROOM BRICK, RENTS
for $25.00 a month, lot 30x100 for $1,450,
half cash. Case & Holmes, 26 East
Broadway.
$1,250.00 BUYS A EIGHT ROOM FRAME
plastered house and a 4 room house,
corner jot 65x110, good location. See
this fo ra investment. S. M. Wade,
room 30 Silver Bow block.
FOR SALE—PROPERTY PAYING 25
per cent net on the investment. Rents
for $115.00. Will sell for $3.77.8 if taken
this week. Ohas. L. Smith, 23 West
Granite street.
FOR SALE—A SNAP, HARNESS AND
carriage, new. for $75.00. Inquire at
521 Diamond street.
for sale—cigar and confec
tionary, cheap for cash. Address
X. Y. /., care Inter Mountain.
RENtDOM PLETE
; norse, delivery
FOR SALE OR
bakery outfit, including
wagon and 3 or 5 room residence.
Good paying trade ready for you.
Thompson Inv. Co., 48 E. Broadway.
FOR SALE—SEVEN-ROOM FRAME
house and lot. 35x100 feet; will rent for
$50 per month. The house alone cost
$1.400 to buiul, and the lot is worth
$500. We will soli this property to day,,
with a good title, for $1.100. Come pre
pared to buy. Case & Holmes, 26 East
Broadway.
MUST BE SOLD AT ONCE—FIRST
class restaurant, receipts $25 to $35 per
day; excellent location. Furniture in
18-room lodging house on Broadway,
$600. Jackson & Cox, 17 West Granite
FOR SALE—CIGAR AND CONFEC
tionery, worth $200, must be sold for
the face of mortgage, $70. Case &
Holmes, 26 East Broadway.
FOR SALE—GOOD SINGER MACHINE,
cheap. Upstairs, 720 Utah avenue.
FOR SALE—A GOOD SECOND HAND
Singer Machine will be sold cheap for
cash. 36 East Broadway.
FOR SALE—TEN ROOM BOARDING
and lodging house near the mines. 30
hoarders, rent only $45; price $675. Hall
Bros., 46 East Broadway.
TYPEWRITER FOR SALE-STAND
ard make, good as new, cheap for cash.
Cail or address A. F. Laird, 550 Frank
lin street. Butte, Mont.
for" "sale— BITTER ROOT VALLEY
No 10—160 acres; all fenced: 100 acres
under cultivation; 20 acres in saleable
timber; A 1 water right; orchard of Côû
bearing trees: also small fruit, 55 acres
seeded to hay; a two-story, six-room
dwelling, good barn and out buildings,
one and one-half miles from town and
good school. No. 12 320 acres, 2 miles
from depot. 4 miles from town, all
fenced, good water right. 200 acres un
der cultivation, 40 acres meadow, can
cultivate 300 acres, 20 acres timber.
Email bearing orchard, log house and
bavn. Price $4,000. A bargain. En
quire of Ravalli County Abstract Co.,
Hamilton, Mont.
MISCELLANEOUS.
W ANTED — LADY ROOM-MATE,
cheap rent. 35 West Copper.
MRS. MAY SEDNEY HAS OPENED
up a cigar and confectionery store
with everything choice and up-to-date
at 231 East Park street'.
BEST NEEDLES AND OTL FOR ALL
sewing machines at the Singer Office,
10 West Quartz street.
WANTED—TO TRADE, A 1100-POUND
team of horses for a 1300 or 1400, and
will pay the difference. Address P. o.
Box 353. Butte. Mont.
TRY BECKWITH'S RESTAURANT, 41
West Park; European plan; meals at
all hours.
650.00 BUYS A NICE THREE ROOM
house and lot on east side. Part cash.
S. M. Wade, room 30 Silver Bow block.
WILL GIVE PART OF CLAIM FOR
representation work, valuable for
bulding lots. Address C. M., care of
Inter Mountain.
MEN — OUR ILLUSTRATED CATA
logue explains how we teach barber
trade in eight weeks, mailed free
Moler Barber College, Minneapolis, Mini'
and:*__________—-----
WANTED. BOARDERS—WHEN YOU
want a first class meal, you should pat
ronize Miss L. Karl, 119 West Dalv
street, Walkerville.
LOST
LOST—ONE BAY AND ONE' MOOSE
colored horse with harne*"' on. The
finder will return to 740 Colorado street
and receive reward.
LOST—A HORSE AND CART FROM
the corner of Montana and Park, color
of horse sorrel with mane cut off. The
finder will please report to the Inter
Mountain office. J. A. McDonald.
WOULD YOU CARE TO INVEST $2.500
in real estate, and get a monthly in
come of $100? If so, see Reynolds &
McDowell, new Bee Hive block.
WANTED-SECOND HAND GOODS
of all kinds. 124 West Park.
guarantee you an answer.
fok rent
for RENT—THREE UNFURNISHED
rooms in basement, rear and front en
trance for 112.00 at 30 West Quartz
street.
FOR RENT—NINE ROOM DWELLING,
good location, $22.50; dwelling, near SLs
I ers Hospital, "«ter, newly papered, a
splendid house, for $11,50.
r OR RENT —- 4-ROOM DWELLING
south of railroad on Nine Mlie road!
$11.oO.
* OR RENT—4-ROOM FRAME DWELL
ing near West Star hoist, large rooms,
large closets, root house, chicken house
and stables, all for $12 50.
F ° R , RENT—4-room modern brick
uat, Platinum street, $25.
FOR RENT—LARGE CORNER STORE,
modern conveniences, heating furnish
ed. South Main street, $50.
FOR RENT—ONE BRICK STORE,
J 52 - Thompson Investment Co.,
i.. E'"tate, Rentals, Insurance. Etc., 48
iit. Broadway, Duttp, Mont.
11 K E E P I N G ROOMS FOR RENT.
i»l vv est Granite street, Butte.
FOR RENT — TWO UNFURNISHED
rooms at 204 West Granite St.
FOR RENT—ON THE WEST SIDE, 7
roorn house, all modern conveniences,
eieciric lights throughout, splendid
oarti newly and handsomely papered,
apply at 221 Excelsior avenue.
FOR RENT—4 ROOMED HOUSE IN
walkerville. Inquire at 1429 Main st.
FOR RENT —AN ELEGANT MAIN
street store. Enquire of J. H. Leyson,
22 North Main street.
FOP. RENT—IN THE TUTTLE BLOCK
two or three desirable steam heated of
_t*- Inquire at Daly's bank.
F UR MISH ED ROOV 13
BOARD
LEXINGTON APARTMENTS—NEWLY
furnished for höusekeeping In apart
ments of two and three voims. All
modern conveniences. Strictly respect
able. Patronage solicited. Office 817
West Galena.
FOR RENT—ONE NICELY FUR
nished front parlor bedroom, with
piano; also one nice front room, newly
furnished; price reasonable. 538 East
Granite.
FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND ROOM,
by the day, week or month; $25 per
month secures you good table board
and a nicely furnished room, at 43 Ana
conda road, opposite the mines.
FOR RENT—NEWLY FURNISHED
rooms in a new brick block with all
modern conveniences. Apply 491 East
Park street.
FURNISHED ROOMS FOR HOUSE
keeping, in brick block; baths free; nice
and warm for winter. 53 West Galena.
UNION BLOCK, WEST MERCURY,
opposite Union Laundry, newly fur
nished front room. Other rooms $12 up.
Bath.
FOR RENT—NEWLY FURNISHED
front parlor bed room, also nicely fur
nished front room up stairs, everything
new and first class, one block from W.
Park. Inquire at 536 West Mercury.
FOR RENT—NICELY UNFURNISHED
rooms, pleasant location; also house
keeping rooms, at 204 West Granite.
FOR RENT—NICELY FURNISHED
front room, reasonable, at 1429 N. Main
street.
FREE BATHS WITH ROOM. ELEC
tric light, steam heat, at 16 West
Broadway, near Clark's bank.
FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOMS
with steam heat. 544 West Broadway.
NICELY FURNISHED ROOMS IN A
new block. £05 South Arizona.
DRESS M A K ING.
MRS. J. FRIEND HAS OPENED
dressmaking parlors at 115 West Ga
lena; accordion and sunburst pleating a
specialty
ASSAYED
BRADEN & BAPT/,
ASSAYKRS
119 Hamilton St. (Carney & Hand's old
stand.) P. O. Box 1261.
A. B ROMBAUER, ASSAYER AND
Chemist. Successor to Carney & Hand,
103 East Broadway.
SPECIALISTS
MAGIC PALMIST, AND SCIENTIFIC
card reader reliable advice and busi
ness transactions, love affairs, mar
riage, divorces, etc. Address
MADAME ISIDORE DEWITT TELLS
the story of your life and diagnoses
your disease by the language of the
hand; relieves pain instantly and cures
disease without drugs. Removed from
the Butte to 218 West Park, Butte.
NOTICE 1*0/1 PUBLICATION. '
Notice is hereby given that John B.
Pearenteau of Dewey, Montana, has filed
notice of Intention to make proof on his
desert-land claim No. 3,344, for the ne%
and ee!4 of nwt4, Section I*. T. 2 N., R.
13 W„ M. M.. before the clerk of ths
district court at Butte, Montana, on Sat
urday, the 14th day of October, 1S99.
He name* the following witnesses to
prove the complete irrigation and reel*
Andrew J. DeLashmutt, deceased, here
tofore admitted to probate in Frederick
county, Md.. and a certified copy of
which, together with the proof o? probate
thereof, duly authenticated, has been filed
in this court, and for hearing the appli
cation of Joseph P. Collins, public admin
tr.ation of said land: Peter H. Deno of
Dewey, Mont.; Ulrich H. Deno of Dewey,
Mont.; James Jensen of Dewey. Mont;
Wm. Forest of Dewey, Mont.
GEOROB D. GREENE.
Register.
Sept. 7. 1899

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