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Daily inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1881-1901, November 24, 1899, Image 8

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053057/1899-11-24/ed-1/seq-8/

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4B$e
lüTe
5 Sco
House
Safe
Then you will always have something
to fall back on in ease of adversity.
Houses for investment are a paying
proposition. We have several snaps that
will pay you two or three per cent per
month.__
Lots and houses for sale in any part of
the city.
REAL ESTATE, LOANS, FIRE
INSURANCE.
CO- 1Ü E-Bfoadw'y
BUTTE, MONTANA
Eroloeols.
Another large consignment of
Pickles just received. High grade
and low prices.
German Imported Dill Pickles,
worth 40c—
Our price per dozen 25c
Small Sour Pickles, just right,
fine flavor—
Our price per quart 15c
Small Sweet Pickles, finest in
the market—
Our price per quart 20c
Stuffed Mangos Cucumber and
Peppers—
Per dozen 40c
Pickled White Onions—they
are fine—
Per quart 40c
California Olives in bulk—
Per quart 40c
Imported Spanish Queen
Olives, large size, in bulk—
Per quart 55c
Sauer Kraut—the genuine
k raut
Per pound sc
Mexican Hot—it is hot—
l / 2 pint 20C
135 West Broadway
Prompt Delivery. Tel. 359.
EN
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had
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and
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four
and
and
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a
at
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and
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AND OTHER
NATIONALITIES
We wish to call your attention
to a shipment we have jTist re
ceived of
I ! Tankards and
Steins
In complete se s, beautifully
painted with appropriate scenes
of ancient days, and above all
used by Germans from the
early days to the present date.
Useful as well as ornamental.
Also to our select line of
Cut Glass Ware
Bohemian Ware
Of the most reliable makes in
the world.
JEWELERS
Main, Corner Broadway
I
MET DEATH
Supposed Fate of the McNa
mara Brothers.
EN ROUTE TO DAWSON
Expected to Join Two Brothers Who
Had Preceded Them—Had
Excellent Prospects.
The fate of Thomas and Daniel Mc
Namara, two well known Walkerville
young men, is a matter of much concern
to the Butte relatives and friends of the
two boys. The circumstances would in- |
diente that they have lost their lives in
the treacherous Yukon river, while en
route from Butte to Dawson City. The
news of the disaster comes in a round
about way. by Associated Press from
Seattle, and is contained in the following
dispatch :
"Seattle, Wash..-Nov. —Further, but
meager, advices of the drowning on No-
vember 11 of five people in the Yukon
above Ogilvie were received by the
steamer City of Seattle tonight. The
dead are: Two McNamara's, brothers;
-- Kelly, Mrs. Drumbolton and Mrs.
Kubdall. The initials or anything fur
ther tending to establish the identity of
the unfortunates were not learned. Two
reports are given as to the manner of
their death. One is that the party
sought to board a scow bound for Daw
son and that float ice swept down upon 1
them, capsizing the boat in which they
had made out to the scow. Another is
that all were on the scow, which got !
caught in the ice and sank." ;
It is quite possible, of course, that the
McNamara brothers who were drowned !
in the Yukon on November 11 were not
the McNamara brothers of Walkerville, j
and the friends of the Walkerville men j
areearnestly hoping thatsuch is the case.
But it is highly improbable that two
brothers by the same name would be !
journeying toward Dawson at the same 1
time as the Walkerville brothers,
Tom and Dan McNamara left Wulker
ville for Dawson City less than two
months ago. according to the statement ,
of a neighbor who knew them very well,
and they should have been sailing up the :
Yukon about the time of this fatal aeci- ■
dent. j
The family came from Virginia City.
New. about four years ago. and com
prised an old mother, almost blind, and
four brothers—John. Michael, Thomas
and Daniel. Thomas was a widower
and had a little family of children.
When the news came of the wonderful
discoveries of gold in the Klondike coun
try. John McNamara left for Dawson
City and was fortunate enough to secure
a claim on Kldorado creek. Bast year, 1
at his request, his brother Mike joined
him. The diggings proved to be of value
and John and Mike, concluding that it
contained gold sufficient for the entire !
family, sent for Thomas and Daniel. This 1
was last sruing. The instructions were!
to wait until late this fall, and to bring!
nothing in the way of provisions with 1
them.
They made their plans accordingly,
and departed for Dawson about two
months ago, expecting to b» abundantly
repaid for their trouble and to return in
a few years with enough wealth to puss
the remainder of their days in peace.
Tom's little family was left in charge
of their grandmother. 1 'ntil a short
time ago Mrs. McNamara resided at No.
1 J-f* North Main street, Walkerville. but
shortly after her sons' departure she
moved to South Butte and could not be
located today.
John N. Olson, Music Teacher and Or
chestra, 126 West Granite •
AGOA'S DEATH INVESTIGATED.
Coroner Jullien conducted an inquest
Iasi night on the remains of Daniel Kgoa,
who died at his home Monday afternoon
under suspicious circumstances. How
ever, a searching investigation failed to
throw any light on the mystery.
Dr. McNevin testified that he called to
see Agoa Monday afternoon, and when he
arrived at Agon's place the latter was
dead. He found a large bruise on the
left side, caused by a fall or blow, and
this, in the doctor's opinion, was the im
mediate cause of death.
Anumber of other witnesses testified,
and while Agoa's movements, up to the
time lie was taken home, were traced,
nothing showing how Agoa received this
fatal blow was brought out. The jury re
turned a verdict that "deceased came to
his death from the effects of rupturing a
blood vessel; that said rupture was pro
duced by a blow on the body, but the
manner in which such blow was received
it is impossible for this jury to deter
mine."
i
AN OLD TIMER DEAD.
I JOINED THE GOLD HUNTERS IN
MONTANA IN IS64.
David G. Allen received word from
Moeedan, N. Y.. yesterday to the effect
that on the nth of this month Isaac
Dean had died in that village after an
illness of a year. In view of the fact
that Mr. Dean was an old-timer in Mon
tana and stood hiRh among his pioneer
associates his death tviil be regretted.
He came here in 1864 and for five years
mined with William Norton. The two
then bought a sheep ranch and while
Norton looked after the ranch Dean lo
cated in Silver Bow and became post
master. express and stage agent, which
positions he held nine years. In 1878 he
returned to Mocedon, bought a carload
of thoroughbred sheep and in the follow
ing spring came back lo '+ nfana with
them. In the fall of the same year ill
health compelled him to go east again.
<»n March 1. 1882. he was united in mar
riage with Miss Mary Fisher and in April
he and his wife came to Montana, but
there was omething about the atmos
phere that prevented Mr. Dean from re
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maining and in the fall of that year he
and his wife went east and remained.
During his residence in Montana Mr.
Dean was a member of the territorial
legislature, taking part in the session of
1872. In his eastern to .Tit he was super
visor three terms, president of the vil
luage two terms, commander of G. S.
Bradley Post No. 450 Grand Army of the
Republic fourteen years, and receiver of
Mocedon lodge of the A. O. U. W. twelve
years.
Mr. Dean was asonof Isaac and Char
lotte Bokey Dean and was born in On
tario. N. Y.. on June 28, 1837.. In 1881
he enlisted in company G, 12th regiment
Indiana volunteers, being at that time
a resident of Fort Wayne. Tnd.. and serv
ed until sickness necessitated his with
drawal from the service. His trip to
Montana consumed six months.
The funeral of the old soldier and pio
neer was held on the 15th under the au
spices of the Ancient Order of United
Workmen and Grand Army, the services
at tile family residence, being augmented
by remarks from Rev. T. W. McLaghlin.
At the grace the Grand Army had charge.
"Taps" were sounded there.
ABANDONED IT.
FOB Tllil ODD FASHIONED COFFEE
WAS KILLING.
"I always drank coffee with the rest of
tile family, for it seemed as if there was
nothing for breakfast if we did not have
it on the table.
"I had been troubled some time with
my heart, which did not feel right. This
trouble, grew worse steadily.
"Some times it would beat fast and at
other times very slowly, so that I would
hardly be able to do work for an hour or j
two after breakfast, and if I walked up j
a hill, it gave me a se\ere pain.
"L had no idea ot what the trouble was
until a friend suggested that perhops it '
might be caused by coffee drinking. I
tried leaving off the coffee and began
drinking Postum CVreal Food Coffee, j
The change came quickly. I am now
glad to sav that l am entirely well of the
heart trouble and attribute the cure to
leaving off coffee and the use of Postum
Cereal Food Coffee. |
"A number of my friends have aban
doned the old fashioned coffee and have
usfng steadilv! ar^some Teopie j
that make Postum very weak and taste
less, but if boiled long enough, accord- j
ing to directions, it is a very delicious j
beverage. We have never used any of
the old fashioned coffee since it was first
started in our house." Mrs. L. A. Smith
Blodgett Mills. Cortland Co., N. Y.
•----j
Live turkeys, ducks, geese and chickens
for sale at 11 West Galena.
A WARM TRAIL.
BETWEEN DAWSON AND
LAKES FROZEN.
I.ate arrivals from Dawson say that
the trail between tha; city and Nome
is warm with the tread of prospectors
and that dogs and scows are in great de
mand. There will be big money made
from the hundreds of scows which
were floated down from Lake Bennett to
Dawson during the past season.
The winter travelers to Nome will cut
across country instead of going down to
the mouth of the Yukon. Many from
the sound cities will go in by Dawson
this winter to avoid tbe rush 1 « the
spring and be ready for sr.irk when the
spring opens. It is believed the beaches
will be so that they can be worked a
month before any vessel can get in so
that the early comers will reap the hal
ves t.
Several boats are reported stuck fast
in the ice at lakes L Barge and Ben
nett and the passengers will be compelled
to come out over the ice.

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to come
AT THE HOTELS.
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The Butte—P. Newman, Minneapolis:
Oscar Stiner, New York; Thomas Kil
patrick, Sumpter, Ore.; Miss Ada Mel
rose, eBatrice Bice, E. A. Braden, S. S.
Schwartz. J. R. Peters, Charles Sellers, ■
New York; Miss Amelia Shepleigh, Bos- !
ton: Miss W. Ball. Rochester; R. H. ;
Kleinschmidt. D. A Cory, Donald Brad- ;
ford Herman Gans. Helena: Thomas .
Smith Chicago; W. N. A vies worth. Deer
V. Creighton, Portland. Ore.: 1
Lodge; J.
William E. Eggleston and wife. Spokane:
C. Holmes, Seattle; B. E. Palmer, Mis
soula: A. H. Merritt. San Francisco;
Samuel Offner, A. B. MeNear, Thomas
Hudson. Chicago: It. Duffroy and wife,
Fairhaven, Wash.: J. W. MeOinley. New
York: Frederick O. L. Beck, Denver.
McDermott— H. L. Billings. Chicago:
P. J. Seal, Helena: E. T. Waggoner, Spo
kane: A. B. Pippin, New York: Albert
Klrinschmidt, Samuel T. Hauser, Helena:
C. T. Davis, Denver; W. W. Morris. Pony;
YY. C. McKaskle, Pony; G. H. Ohisson,
St. Paul: E. W. Beattie, Helena: Robert
A. Brackett. New York: J. B. Miller,
Springfield. O. ; B. Y. Burns, Divide; T. B.
Gray, San Francisco: C. Willoughby, D.
Meeker, Herda: J. C. Lalor, Anaconda;
C. S. Hmd. Glasgow; T. W. Poindexter,
Jr.. Helena; C. M. Copper, St. Louis; R.
B. Smith. Helena.
i
Site CitT Grocery
High Patent Bread Flour, per
100 pounds..................$1.75
Big 4 Flour, per 100 pounds.... 2.00
Gold Dust Flour, per 100 pounds 2.00
Pastry Flour, best made 50
pounds .....................65
Hams, finest cured, per lb......10'j.
Breakfast Bacon, finest cured
per lb........................10
10-lb pail Lard, SOcts, 5-lb Lard .40
Potatoes per 100 lbs.........1.23
30 bars Silk soap.............. 1.00
30 bars Cudahy C soap.........1.00
30 bars White Rose soap...... 1.00
Cudahy Tar soap, per cake... .05
5-lb, Crescent Creamery Butter 1.50
3 packages Sapoiio ..............25
4 packages Starch .............25
Claret Wine per gal. (while it
lasts) ........................25
Port Wine, worth $5.00 p«r gal .75
2-lb box Coda Crackers ........ir,
:;-lb Ginger Snaps...............25
457
East Park -Street.
Phone 432.
WERE MADE
And Instructions Given in the
Shadwell Murder Case.
A VERDICT IS EXPECTED
Before Midnight—Pemberton Brings
Tears to the Eyes 0. the
Prisoner.
When Judge Clancy adjourned his de
partment of the district court last even
ing all the testimony in the case of the
state vs. Robert Shadwell had been sub
mitted and the matter was ready for ar
gument. On taking the case up this
morning the county attorney asked the
court to strike from the record all tes
timony relating to some trouble that oc
curred between a man named Johnson
.and Shadwell prior to the killing of
, , ' ... . ... ,
O Connor. This testimony, he said, had
been brought out by hint while cross-ex
amining the defendant and he thought
he had gone too far in the matter, that
an y trouble belwee nJohnson and Shad
,, . . . . .,
" e11 had no business in the proceedings,
(The defense made no opposition and the
court said he would instruct the jury to
pay no attention to the objectionable tes
timony. Before the argument was coni
Jud «e Pemberton, one of the de
fendant s counsel, gave notice that he
would ask the court to instruct the jury
to not return a verdict of murder in the
first degree, for the reason that the tes
timony adduced was not of sufficient
strength to warrant it, and, besides, the
supreme court, in passing upon the ap
peal of tite defendant after the first trial,
had said that the verdict was not in con
sonance with the testimony.
Cornelius F. Kelly, chief deputy to the
county attorney, addressed the jury first.
He said that for nearly a week they had
been engaged in trying a man thaï had
transgressed the laws of and God.
He had felt as deep a sympathy for the
prisoner's mother as a man could, but
notwithstanding the fact that he thought
the mother's grief genuine her mental
anxiety should not interfere with the ap
plication of the law in the case of her
son. He then paid his respects to the
testimony and pictured the tragedy in
the gambling room at No. 10 East Park i
street as the result of ill-feeling engend- t
ered bet wen the two over a game of
cards. He expressed the belief that
Shadwell did not have on his person, at
the time O'Connor told him he would
breaJt his head with a chair, the big gun
with which he shot O'Connor, and also j
doubted the story told by the defendant I
in regard to leaving- the game before the i
shooting and going out with the inten
tion of eating a lunch and giving his bro
■ ther a key to the house in which they
lived. There was another thing, he said,
that exposed the thinness of the defense.
The actions of O'Connor after the gun
was drawn showed that he was trying to
I hide from the gun. but the defendant had
stated that O'Connor had him cornered.
Judge Pemberton spoke first in behalf
of the defendant. He called the atten
I tion of the jurymen to the fact that they
had lifted their naked hands toward
1 heaven and sworn they had no bias or
1 prejudice in the case; that the judge of
I tlie court and the young men represent
■ ing the prosecution were bound by oath
! to give the defendant a fair and impar
; tial trial. Even the witnesses had been
; sworn to tell the truth. The eredibil
. by of the latter, he said, would be left
to the jurymen to consider after they had
1 enCP, ' ( ' d 'heir room. Th« question of
d their room,
murder involved more than the simple
far t that the defendant fired the pistol.
The jury would have to go beyond that
and determine the intent—determine
whether he had murder in his mind and
heart and the condition of his mind at
A CURTAIN LECTURE
MR. MARRIED MAN
DEAR SIR—To know the exact mean
ing of a curtain lecture you have only
to buy a pair of lace curtains for your
wife without consulting the special
sale prices we make for this week.
To the Ladies
We simply say that our prices and the quali
ties they cover are stronger arguments in fa
vor of buying of us than any word picture that
might be painted by the most gifted lecturer.
HERE ARE THE PRICES
WHY NOT CCME AND SEE THE CURTAINS?
CHENILLE CURTAINS
Same as above, better grade, cut from
LACE CURTAINS
Nottingham Lace Curtains, 3 yards ,— | _ |
.long, tricot ed for................. OLJ OtiS
Better and larger ones. 3M> yards long, 50
inches wide, for....................
Still larger ones, 3Vi yards long, 54 inches ___ _
wide, for........................... $1.50
OHENTLXjTC curtains
3 yards long. 36 in. wide, heavy fringe
top and bottom, all colors, cut from
$2.50 to...............................
1 .OO
150
$u.50 to.
$S 50
DAMASK PORTIERES
0 V 2 yards long. 48 in. wide, all colors,
fringed to and bottom, cut from $3.00 to $3.00
Same, in better grade, cut from $4.00 to.. $3.00
HEAT1NC STOVES
OUR IDEAL OAKS- -Are making it warm for all who buy
_____ them. Our prices are making it warm for competition, and your
coal pile is about the only thing that our IDEAL OAK HEATER won t make it warm for.
No. 10 for $8.50. No. 12 for $11.00. No. 14 for $13.50.
BROWNFIE LD-CANTY CARPET Co
48 to £4 WEST PARK STREET, BUTTE.
Goods Sold on the Installment Plan
Mail Orders Promptly Filled
CM
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the time of the tragedy. So far as the
evidence had gone it showed that Shad
well had not wronged O'Connor, but on
the other hand O'Connor had played the
role of bully, not only with the defend
ant, but with others. He had Walked
aroung seeking a victim on whom he
could vent his wrath. A poor laboring
man had entered the game of cards, lost
his money and in a temporary fit of petu
ancy had torn up a deck of cards. He
had then gone into the barroom. O'Con
nor had followed him and told him he
would go out into the back yard or any
other place and fight him. A poor
Italian hot tomale peddler with a crip
pled hand had entered the game and
O'Connor had said to him: "Young man,
from the looks of your hand you have
been in trouble and if you don't play this
game fair I'll cat off the balance of your
lingers."
Referring to the time when Shadwell
had the gun pointed at O'Connor, the
speaker said O'Connor did not think Shad
well would shoot; that he kept moving
towards Shadwell with the intention of
grabbing him, pulling him over the table
and beating him to death. He asked
the jury to consider the difference in the
size of the two men—one weighed be
tween 160 and 180 pounds, the other 110
and no one to help him. He branded
O'Connor as a great big bully, adding
that lie had Shadwell well cornered. He
wanted each of the twelve to put him
self in Shadwell's place and consider
what he would have done to O'Connor
under the circumstances. He did not
believe that Shadwell was guilty of mur
der In the first degree, second degree,
manslaughter or any other degree save
justifiable homicide. .
Towards the latter part of his address
the ex-chief justice of the supreme court
grew eloquent and his sympathetic
passages touched the prisoner, his
mother and brother to tears. He spoke
of the wrong path taken by the defend
ant, but proclaimed him to be still the
son of a poor old English working-woman
and entitled to a fair trial and a just re
turn.
Shortly before 11 o'clock Mr. Pemberton
finished his address and Mr. Thresher be
gan. The latter said he had been ill
and had not recovered sufficiently to
stand on his feet very long, but he felt
it to be his duty to be present if possible.
It was not natural for a lawyer to go into
a case with his mind unbiased. When
ever such a thing came to pass barnyard
cocks would cease to tight for suprem
acy. prize fighters would not go into the
ring to contest their physical ability, foot
ball and base ball players would lose
interest in their games and orators would
cease to contend with each other.
Mr. Thresher completed his talk this
afternoon and gave way to County At
torney Connolly. It was late when the
latter got through. The judge then in
structed jury and the latter retired. A
verdict is expected before midnight.
TO THE LADIES.
Purchasing of every description done,
dressmaking superintended, samples and
information sent on application.
MRS. M. SUTHERLAND,
355 West Park St., Portland, Ore. *
HELENA-'FRISCO STOCK.
Stock in the Helena-Frisco can be sub
scribed for at the office of the Thompson
Investment company, No. 48 East Broad
way, Butte, or at their New York office.
Rooms 1214 and 1215, Commercial Cable
building, 20 Broad street.
Miss Mary L. Johnson, sole agent of
the Williamson Corset and the Gillette
Skirt Co. Measure taken and fit guar
anteed. 131 West Broadway. *
PROFITABLE SILENCE.
Detroit Free Press: "I think that hus
bands ought to pay their wives a weekly
salary." declared Mrs. Tomdik.
"About how much?" asked Mrs. llo
jack.
"Well, say $10 a week."
"I used to think so, too. until T discov
ered that my husband pays about $800 a
year for my millinery and clothes alone,
and then T decided that any salary I
would like to ask for wouldn't go very
far."
BUSINESS CHANCE.
Yabsley—"In all my life I never met a
Jew beggar."
Wickwire—"Neither have I. It is
wonder one or two don't take up the
business. It would be such a novelty.'
Indianapolis ournal.
•Ail the new magazines and late noveJs
at the P. O. News Stand. New station
ery .just received. *
Vienna saloon, 119 South Main street.
Choice wines, liquors and cigars. See
our new orchestrion, the only one In
Butte. Albini Sisters, Proprietors.
.$1.40
10 c
$1.1 ;
Friday, Nov. 24. 180!).
Wi 're Lucky
This year. We bought heavily be
"-' re ,l!le packing season was fairly
on. and secured prices that are un
heard of today. While everyone else
are putting up their prices, we s'ill
keep our prices down—because we
have a reputation to sustain.
Selling Good Groceries
Cheap.
FANCY FRENCH PRUNES—
Large and meaty, 3 pounds.. -' 5 c
U pounds............... Si 00
50-pound box ...... . . . . . . . . . I$ 3!50
SMALLER SIZED PRUNES—
17 pounds for................. «4 j)0
PURE FRUIT JAMS—
Extra fine, 2 cans ......... 9 -,,
Dozen assorted ......
FINE PUMPKIN—
J-pound can, each ....
Dozen ................
Case...............
FANCY PEAS
Natural flavor—natural color,
natural sweetness —2 cans.... 25c
STANDARD EARLY
JUNE PEAS—
We don't sell the cheapest
sorts, can ..................... i 0c
FANCY BELL
FLOWER APPLES—
Large boxes, fancy wrapped,
box ............................ -
Large boxes, unwrapped,
box ............................$1.60
WHEAT FLAKES—
2 -pound package ............. ioe
QUAKER OATS—
Package ............ i 0 c
ROLLED OATS—
3 packages .................... 05 p
PILLSBURY'S VITOS OR
RALSTON BREAKFAST
FOOD—
Package.................... 15 ,.
OUR DELICIOUS BUTTER—
None quite so good, pound____ 30e
IMPERIAL COCOA—
"Finest ever tasted," is what
everybody says having tried
it; Yi-pound can .............. 20 c
3 £-pound can ................. 40 c
GROUND CHOCOLATE—
Requires no boiling—prepared
instantly—fine for frosting
cakes, too—%-pound can..... 25c
Brothers.
Cash Grocers.
I 47 W. Park St. Tel. 68
BUTTE, MONT.
\ Prompt Delivery. Mail Orders Solicitj th
Just Received
The latest and most tasty designs in
Novelties—Tooth Brushes, Nail Files,
Brushes and Thousands of Articles.
STERLING SILVER worth 75c selling
for 35c.
CRACKER JARS.
Beautifully colored glass, silver mount
ed, value $2.50; selling for $1.50.
Simon Banks,
Jeweler and Optician. Eyes Ex
amined Free.
125 N. Hain Street, Butte.

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