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Daily inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1881-1901, December 14, 1899, Image 4

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Sale
Prices..
Maple Syrup, finest made, gallon $1.10
Whole Cod Fish. 16 pounds........ 1.00
Orange Lemon and Citron Peel.. 20c
Cinnamon, Pepper and Mustard.. 20c
S packages Breakfast Cocoa...... 50c
3 pounds Bankers Mocha and Java
Coffee....................... 1.00
1 pint bottle Catsup. 15c. quarts.. 25c
2 cans California Grapes or Plums 25c
White Potatoes, $t.20, red......... 1.25
New Orleans Table Molasses, gals.. 75c
Onion per hundred............... 1.65
Flour per sack.................65 to 75c
Fancy Bread Flour, per sack...... 1.00
Fair Bread Flour, per sack....... 93c
40 bars Laundry soap............ 1.00
COOK'S
331 East Park Street, Butte
Ursuline Convent
MOUNT ANGELA
ST. PETER P. 0., MONTANA.
Fourteen miles west of the nearest sta
tion. CASCADE, on the MONTANA
CENTRAL RAILROAD Extensive
grounds, fine mountain scenery and an
exceptionally healthful climate. English
and classical courses. Art, Music and
the Modern Languages. Terms moder
ate. telephone connections. By tele
phoning to the Convent a conveyance)
will meet pupils at Cascade.
St. Joseph's Academy, a separata
Boarding School for boys under 14 years.
Address
THE MOTHER SUPERIOR.
LOOK
In at any store or residence
that is using GAS for light.
J j Look at their monthly bills,
J ! and then look at your bill, and
be convinced that
Gas is the Cheapest
j fand Best Liglit.
* QUITE GAS LIGHT
1 D AND COKE CO.
2 84E. Broadway, Butte, Mont
iiieEouKoliUi
j ! Änd Oyster Parlors. I !
; The First Class Restaurant of i *
<, the city. J3ESÏ OF MEALS < >
« 1 15 Cents and upward. < ►
\\ Frivate Rooms for Ladies o
< , Also Dealers la < >
JI Chinese and Japanese!!
J Fancy Goods o
▼ Best. Teas, Fine Silks,Chinaware Etc! [
J S7 W. Park St. # Butte. *
HUM FAY. Prop, and Mgr
Huie Pock & Co.,
Merchant Tailors
Chinese and Japanese Fancy
Ccods. Ladies' and Gentei
rr.en's Underwear made to or
der- Teas, Chinaware. Etc
227 S. Main Street, Butte
E R.CHUNG'S Celebrated
B*rb Sanitaria«
Guarantees ta «urn on
diseases by means of U4
famous Chinese inedf.
einen, never beforn intro
duced into this country
Hi- bas cured thousands
and can cum you- Ad »"ce free. S3 Wmi
O rison street. Butts. Moat.
A BUTTE LODGE NO. 22, A. P &
vVa. M. Regular meeting In Ma.
/W sonic Temple, second and fourth
Tuesdays of each month. Sojourning
brethren cordially invited to attend.
A «LVEK BOW LODGE NO. 4*.
ww A. F. A A. M. Regular meeting In
/V\ Masonic Temple, second and
fourth Thursdays of each rnoMh. So
Jour h in^brethren cordially Invited to at.
toad.
Yancey. secretary.
.•a
All Furnaces Are Working
Full Time Now.
ORDERS FOR THE STOCK
Will Take the Output Until the Latter
Part of Next Year—Activity in the
Rail Trade—Eventful Week in the
Metal Market.
New York, Dec. 14.—Discussing the
condition of iron and metal trades, the
Iron Age says: Our monthly blast fur
nace statistics show that we entered the
month with coke and anthracite furnaces
producing at the rate of 289,500 tons
weekly, an increase of 8,000 tons over
November. In other words, we are mak
ing now at the rate of 15,000,000 gross
tons per annum. During the month re
ported furnace stocks increased about
5,000 tons, but on the other hand stocks
in warrant yards declined 6,000 tons. On
December 1 the independent furnaces
were carrying a stock of 95,000 tons.
Under what pressure the iron industry
is wurking is shown by the fact that in
the central west, including Pittsburg,
tlie valleys, the Wheeling district, the
Chicago district, Missouri and the north
west, there were in blast 97 furnaces,
producing weekly 170,345 tons of pig,
while only five were out, with a capacity
of 5.465 tons and every one of the latter
is simply out for repairs. In the next
three months three new furnaces are ex
pected to begin operations whose ca
pacity should reach 12,000 tons weekly.
Practically every ton of the iron which
all these furnaces can make during the
first half of 1900 is sold. Last week a
leading consumer in the Pittsburg dis
trict purchased about 40,000 tons of Bes
semer pig at $24, valley furnace, which
closed out the available for the first
half of 1900. It is understood that the
same interest and other large companies
in the same section have been taking
large blocks of basic pig also.
In foundry irons the situation is some
what different. There is some increase
in stocks in many of the districts. The
.
conviction seems general that the top
notch has been reached for the present,
While a number of foundries have with
drawn from the market, some appear to
believe in the future. We hear of one
contract for 500 tons, monthly delivery,
beginning April 1 and continuing to the
end of the year. We also note a Sale
to an independent cast iron pipe faundry.
In the stock of Birmingham reports a
sale of 6,000 on private terms. From
Pittsburg comes the news of sales of
Bessemer and open hearth billets and
slabs to the extent of about 40.000 tons
for 1900 delivery at $36 for the Bessemer
and $41 for the open hearth material.
Lately offers for export have come to
hand which would net about $29 to $30.
As yet, however, nothing has been done.
There has been a little more activity
in the rail trade. Eastern mills have
placed about 20,000 tons in lots, while the
Chicago market has closed for one lot
of 20,000 tons, the same parties placing
also about 10.000 tons of bridge material.
Regarding the position of the markets
in a number of finished rolling mill
products, reports are somewhat conflict
ing. In some quarters a revival in buy
ing- is observed, in others prices seem to
be regarded as easier, the mills hunting
for work to some extent.
The week has been an eventful one in
the metal markets, and notably so in
pig tin, which declined under London
realizing down to 34 cents for futures,
rallying slightly toward the close.
Copper is openly quoted at 16.75 cents
for lake and 16.50 cents for electrolytic.
Lead has become stronger, while spel
ter has been somewhat erratic, with an
upward tendency.
Nickel is reported to have sold as low
as 28 cents.
Cleveland, Ohio. Dec. 14.—The Iron
Trade Review says: Sales of the old
range Bessemer ores of Lake Superior
began on Monday of this week. While it
is not to be expeeteds that the scramble
of last spring, when prices were about
$2.50 a ton lower, will be repeated, large
contracts have been entered into in the
past few days, and in the case of some
large producers the bulk of the output
for 1900 has been sold. Mesaba Bes-,
or I 1 ?! the lead of Biwawi
*î Ut BJ aV , e r° k ] on a haals °I $4.80
for Fayal. Eastern furnaces have been
in the market, hut western buyers set
the pace. Imports of Cuban and other
foreign ores will be on an enlarged seal
next year, but even with 250,000 tons from
Cuba and 200.000 tons from Newfound
land. and increased shipments of low
ores from Mediterranean points, the
total will be but a fraction of the wants
of the east apart from its local ores.
Reports show that stocks of pig iron in
foundry yards are light. The week has
brought no change in prices.
Has Many Sympathizers.
Chicago, Dec. 14.—A special to the
Record from Fort Scott, Kan., says: John
P. Reece, national committeeman of the
United Mine Workers of America, who
has just been released from the federal
jail in this city, where he was confined
on a 90 days sentence for contempt for
addressing a strikers' meeting at Yale
In violation of a federal court injunc
tion, last night addressed a large meet
ing of strikers. The meeting was a cele
bration of the -temporary release of
Reece, who is out under a *3.000 'bond
pending a hearing on a writ of habeas
corpus.
Experiments Were Relayed
New York, Dec. 14.—A special to the
Herald from Washington says: Because
of the alleged action of Brig. Gen. Buf
fington. chief of ordnance, in delaying ex
periments by failing to promptly disburse
the neccessary funds, the board of ord
nance and fortifications, of which Gen.
Mlies is president, has been compelled to
ask congress to change the law. organis
ing it so it can make its own expend!*
tures. There has been considerable fric
tion bebween the bureau of ordnance and
the board of ordnance and fortifications
and Gen. Miles has been compelled to
bring the matter to the attention of Sec
retary Root. It has been shown that the
bureau of ordnance, in its annual report,
made no mention of the work of the board
in the matter of development of certain
high explosives and munitions of war, ex
perimenting with them after the bureau
had failed to take them up, though Gen.
Buffington took the credit. It is no secret
that the bureau has deliberately held up
recommendations made by the board,
which were approved by the secretary of
war, delaying the conduct of experi
ments and placing this government be
hind foreign governments, it is said, in
several important particulars.
Fight For the Honor.
Washington, Dec. 14.—Representatives
of the rival cities which seek the honor of
entertaining the next republican national
convention, are actively at work. Chi
cago and Philadelphia, New York and St.
Louis are represented by big delegations.
The Philadelphians report that the most
serious obstacle they have met is the
charge that Pennsylvania is in favor of
Mr. Payne's resolution basing the repre
sentation in the national convention on
the republican vote cast which would cut
down the southern representation. The
southern delegates they say, have an idea
that Pennsylvania is for the proposed
change and they have started out tonight
to counteract this impression. The
statement is made that the southern na
tional committeemen propose to act as aj
unit and cast their votes on the subject i
of the selection of the meeting place in !
such a way as will win for them most sup
port in their fight against re-apportion
ment.
•Vo,,,. t-\o„ it » , , . ..
\° lle ' DeC ' A dispatch to thej
Herald from Port of Spain, Trinidad,;
says: The German cruiser Stosch has left J
here for Puerto Ca-bello, Venezuela, upon j
tlie urgent request of the German con- i
Protect German Interests.
sul in Caracas. The cruiser will pro
tect the interests of German subjects,
which the consul believes are in danger
because of the disturbed state of affaira
in Puerto C'abello.
Peruvian Affairs.
Lima, Petri!, Dec. 14.—'Congress has
closed its session after sanctioning the
budget, which calls for a deficit of half a
million dollars. Congress failed to pro- !
vide for covering this deficit. It is gen- 1
erally -believed that President Roman«, !
now that he is free from inconvenient
interference on the part of congress, will
form a capable ministry to carry out the
excellent programme he mapped out on
assuming the reigns of government.
No Anxiety Felt.
Portland, Ore., Dec. 14.—No anxiety is
felt here for the French ship Louis Pas- \
teur. reported in a San Francisco dispatch
as overdue. The Pasteur is under charter
to a San Francisco firm for Portland
loading. The. charterers do not expect
her before the last of this month.
A Swimming Record.
San Francisco. Dec. 14.—At a swimming
tournament of the Olympic club last
night W. A. Wideman made a new
world's record, making the 25 yard dash
in 12 2-5 seconds.
PASSION PLAY IN 1900.
Berlin Cor. Chicago Record: Great pre
parations are being made at Oberammer
_ . , ,
r the 1 '; ly to .I 1 - 1 * asain h-ld !
a the famous little village in 1900. "Cal
i^sSf' lWho wa ? manager of the!
afta !'j_ n waa again chosen for this j
position. His opponent, the wood carver,
Bauer*, a very popular man, came near
being elected, receiving 85 votes, while
Lange received 95.
( . ane Nome run will noon he seiiir,»
a premium! S
At present the first class fare from
g ea ttle to Cape Nome is $100; second
class $80, and freight $40 per ton. In
order to secure r berth now, it is neeos
sary to deposit twenty-five per cent of
the ocean fare. For full particulars re
IT'S A FACT.
This is if you intend to go to the CAPE
NOME Gold Fields and you expect to go
there on one of the first boats sailing
next spring, you should have your steam
er accommodations reserved at once; ;,t
present there are only a few first class
vessels available for this service, and
unless the government comes to the re
lief of the steamship companies by re
leasing a number of the transports now
in the Philippine service, berths on the
first class boats now available for the
garding steamer reservation, sailing
dates, etc., call upon or write
W. H. MERRTMAN, Gen't. Agt.
Northern Pacific R.v.
City Ticket Office, Cor. Park and Main
Sts.. Butte Mont.
A Womu's Stay
Is her hair. Men tad 1
would have ai luxuriant I
they could with il il we
lor a germ or parasite that tap* I
the nourishing oil at the root ol I
the hair, and causing dandrefi I
by burrowing up the scalp. I
DandruH ia tlas forerunner et I
thin hait and baldneas. Sei- I
race s latest discovery ia hew le I
kill that germ, and that destroyer I
la containud in no other hair I
restorer but Ncwbro's Hetfi-I
sida I
Bor Me at all First Class I
Drug Stares j
is
a
$
S.
RELIEF OF BANKS
No Action as Yet.
PLANS FOR THE FUTURE
Will Not be Disclosed—The Idea That
Money Would Return to New York
From the South and West Has Not
Been Realized.
New York, Dec. 14.—A special to the
Herald from Washington says: Secre
tary Gage will riot anticipate in an inter
view any action he may take for the
purpose of putting into circulation more
of the money now hold in the treasury.
When I asked him for information on
the subject today, he said:
"There is nothing I can add to what
I have already said. No action has as
yet been taken, and if I said that none
is contemplated today it does not follow
that nothing will he done the day after
or next week."
"It has been suggested that you may
anticipate the January interest on the
government bonds."
"Yes." said the secretary, "that may
be done or it may not be done. I cannot
speak for the future. It would not be
proper for me to anticipate any action
0 f thj s )hat j might take even if I
knew that future conditions would prob
ably be such as to justify it."
In the opinion of the treasury officials
P? 11 *!* 1 scarcity of money in New
York at the present time is due to the
fact that the currency sent from the
New York banks to the west and south
to be used in the annual crop movement
has not returned as freely as in former
years, but has been absorbed by the
business of the communities to which it
was sent. Speaking of this phase of the
situation. Secretary Gage said:
"It is undoubtedly true that the busi
ness of the country in every locality re
quires much more money for current use
than it did in times of depression. This
is but a natural result of the increased I
prosperity. Eventually a stage of satu
ration must be reached, when the in
terlor has all the currency that it can
absorb. Whether that stage has yet
been reached or not, cannot be said,
Business in any locality requires more
money in its transaction,
tainiy
just as cer
as more goods to transport re- j
quires more cars on the railroads. It
moans that there are more things to buy
and more people have more money with
which to buy them. It means that work
men receive larger wages and are able
to carry more money in their pockets.
Whether these^ conditions will be per
manent or not of course no one can
say. That they will continue for some
time, however, there seems to be no
doubt. As long a.s present conditions
continue, more goods of all kinds will
be manufactured, more workmen will get
constant employment at increasing
wages and larger areas will be put under
cultivation, resulting In more agricul
tural products."
"If the interior of the country perma
nently absorbs more currency than it
has used heretofore, does it not follow
that New York and other money centers
must get along with less circulation than
they have heretofore had at their dis
posal?"
"That will necessarily follow," replied
the secretary, "unless there is an in
crease in bank note circulation. This
condition, therefore, affords another ar
gument in favor of an increased bank
circulation with such a degree of elas
licit.v as shall enable it to respond au
tomatically to any temporary demand
for more currency in any locality."
that the reports of Canadian money be- j
ing withdrawn from New York to be !
loaned abroad are exaggerated. Ho :
bases this belief on the fact that money
commands a higher rate in Now York
than in I^ondon—the New York rate be- !
ing about 7 per cent and the London 1
rate about 6 per cent. This difference in
interest rates would offer an inducement
to the Canadian banks to keep their:
money in New York. The secretary also
believes that much of the Canadian I
money in New York is so invested as to
preclude Its speedy withdrawal, and un- I
less there should be a simultaneous with- I
ctrawal thpre would not be much danger
of the money market being seriously af
fected.
NO GENTLEMAN.
Now York Evening Sun: "Truth com
pels meto state," said the presiding officer !
of a medical congress, "that upon that '
list of physicians present just read there :
is one that is no gentleman." A stir of j
surprise passed over the assemblage at !
this, and one man. upon whose foot, as ;
the presiding officer said afterward, the j
shoe seemed to be a perfect fit, half rose
from his seat. But in another moment
woman's voice from the back part of
the hall made itself heard.
" Iquite agree with Dr. Blank," said
the voice, "for I am that physician. Tn
my turn, I must say, however, that Dr.
Blank is no lady."
W ANT A dv ' s
Two Cents Per Word for First Issue.
One Cent Per Word After First Issue.
1.00 Per Line Per Month,
DRESS MAKING.
DRESSMAKER. WISHES EMPLOY*
ment permanently. Address 332 South
Montana street.
MRS. J. FRIEND HAS OPENED
dressmaking parlors at 115 West Ga*
lena: accordion and sunburst pleating a
specialty.
TAILOR
B. BROWN. THE ARTISTIC TAt
lor, has opened up shop at 333 South
Main street, where he is prepared to
make latest style suits up to order.
Prices within reach of all. Work
guaranteed. Bee him before going
elsewhere. 333 Main street.
HAS YOUR ADVERTISEMENT OF
WANTED—A Hired Girl—A Dressmaker-A Nurse-A Cook or Waiter-A Por
ter Been mentioned- in this, want colu mn?-i0c„ 15c. or 23c-., will do it. We guir
antee you an answer. ' su r
employment'
ANY LADY HAVING 2 OR 3 HOURS'
spare time| a day can make $5 weekly
for use at home; nothing to sell. Send
self-addressed envelope for free sample.
Manhattan E. M. Co., 101 Beekman
street, New York.
MONEY TO LADY OR GENTLEMEN
canvassers. We offer liberal cash com
missions for subscriptions to the "De
signer," the handsomest and most pop
ular Fashion Magazine. Easy, profita
ble work. For terms and sample copy
apply to Standard Fashion Co., 32 West
Fourteenth St., New York, N. Y.
WANTED AT ONCE—A RELIABLE
working woman to assist with care of
block in exchange for rent of furnished
housekeeping rooms. Apply 217 West
_ Galena Street.
WANTED—MEN TO LEARN BARBER
trade. Ony two months required to
complete. Will pay $15.09 weekly when
competent. Have 500 positions open
Jan. 15th. Come now and prepare for
these places. No expense to learn if
you will work for us. Catalogue mail
ed free. Moler Barber College. Minne
apolis, Minn.
WANTED—GIRL WANTED TO DO
general house work. Apply at this office.
WANTED — SITUATION — BY A GEN
ei-al repair man; blacksmith and
wagon maker; horse-shoeing. Address
V. P. XV., Inter Mountain.
WANTED—LADY AGENTS TO IN
troduee a rapid seller; $15 per week or
100 per cent commission. One agent
made $15 in one day. Apply at 641
South Dakota street. Call between 2
and 4 p. m.
WANTED—BY A GOOD HONEST AND
trustworthy lady, a job cleaning and
taking care of offices, can furnish best
of references. Address or call at 529
West Broadway street.
W A N T E D—BY A FIRST -CLASS
dressmaker, position to go out by the
day, best reference. Address 618 West
Park street.
BUSINESS CHANCES.
FOR SALE—FURNITURE OF 7 ROOM
ed house good as new; also house foi
rent, best location in the city, apply
323 West Galena street.
FOR SALE — 18 ROOM LODGING
house, brick, electric lights and bath,
Une location, $500. This is a snap.
Must be sold at once. Call at room 30
Silver Bow block. S. M. Wade.
HOUSE AND LOTS ALL SIZES AND
prices in all parts of the city for resi
dences and investments. If you want
to buy call at room 30, Silver Bow
block. S. M. XVade.
FOR SALE SEVERAL CHOICE BUILD
ing lots on West Side, near Excelsior
avenue, among which are three corner
lots, $600 and $575 each. At this figure
we almost give them away. Case &
Holmes, 26 East Broadway.
FOR SALE—3 ROOMED HOUSE AND
lot near Main street, rents for $15.00
per month for $650.00. Case & Holmes,
26 East Broadway.
FO RSALE—5 ROOM FRAME HOUSE
and lot on XVoolman street, will rent
for $30.00 a month, for $1,150. Case &
Holmes, 26 East Broadway.
FOR SALE—BILLIARD AND POOL
tables, almost new, will sell on pay
ments. or cheap for cash. Rooms 11-16
West Broadway. '
FOR SALE—PIT GAMES OF NOTED
strain, also thoroughbred brown leg
horns. Call after 5 p. m. 914 South
Montana.
FOR SALE CHEAP—FIRST CLASS
lodging house, electric lights, steam
heat, good as new. Mrs. Ella Elphl
son, 121 Main street, Anaconda.
FOR SALE—FINE BUFFALO ROBE.
Address care this office.
FOR SALE—FURNITURE OF i'OUR
l-oom house, good as new; also house
for rent; will sell very reasonable;
reason, leaving the city. Inquire at 482
East Park street.
GOOD MILCH COW FOR SALE. NO. 12
Harrison street, Meadervilie. M.
Bcntly.
FOR SALE—A SALOON, GOOD LOCA
tion. Inquire at Copper State Saloon,
055 South Arizon^
HORSE, WAGONS AND HARNESS
for sale cheap. Oechsli, 124 West Park.
FOR SALE—GOOD PAYING RKSTAU
rant, worth $400; must be sold for $175.
Case & Holmes. 26 East Broadway.
FOB BALE - BITTER ROOT VALLEY
No. 10—169 acres; all fenced; 100 acres
under cultivation: 20 acres in saleable
timber; A 1 water right; orchard of £00
hearing trees-, also small fruit, 55 acres
seeded to hay, a two-story, six-room
dwelling, good barn and out buildings,
one and one-half miles from town and
good school. No. 12—320 acres, 2 miles
from depot. 4 miles from town, all
fenced, good water right, 200 acres un
der cultivation, 40 r.cres meadow, can
cultivate 300 acres, 20 acres timber,
smAll bearing orchard, log house and
barn. Price 34,000- A bargain. En
quire of Ravalli County Abstract Co.,
Hamilton. Mont.
M O N E Y TO LO AN
MONEY TO LOAN—ON REAL ESTAT 0
security at 10 per cent. Also -money
to loan on chattels. Chas. L. Smith,
23 West Granite street.
FOUND
FOUND—A BLACK SILK SCARF, ON
West Granite. Owner can have same
by identifying It and paying for
thls ad.
SPECIALISTS
IN THE EXACT SCIENCE OF PALM*
Istry Madame DeXVitt is an adept.
Magnet le healing Is recognised as an
advanced mode of relieving pain and
curing disease without the aid of drugs.
' Kmnovwd from the Butte hotel to 211
West Park.
miscellaneous.
$10.00 REWARD NO QUESTIONS ASK
W 0L r , e i Urn , ^Ulster taken from 107
Quait/i street, Tuesday night. E
a - Se mple, 417 Hennessy building.
T Wesf^ ' l £ H ' RESTAURANT. 41
all horns.' k ' European Plan; meals at
1 ÄÄ 9
West Granite.
UOR LEASE — NINETEEN
ig house " ' '
tral location. Jackcon & Cox.~" N 0 . Ï 7
PARTY WANTS TO RENTA I one
ing house or buy one on monthly nav"
ments. Address S. T. A., Inter Moun
W Ä rKD -7 AI ^ EWDS OF CAST OFF
BEST NEEDLES AND OIL FOR 17*7
n l Är a ^, at the Sin 2er om™
10 W est Quartz street.
nge r Ofllco,
VX ANTED-TO TRADE, A liriO-t^T; T ^r,
team of horses for a 1300 or 1400 and
will pay the difference. Address P o
Box *i53, Butte, Mont.
ASSAYSr? >.
BRADEN &. BAPTf,
ASSAYKItS
119 Hamilton St. (Carney & Hand'« old
stand.) P. O. Box 1264. a » old
A Ch P ; *™ RAUEP " ESSAYER AND
, f 5 e ,™' 8 - Successor to Carney & Hand.
.Last Broadway.
FOR RENT
2.00—Six-room modern brick. West Side
»ante furnished $50.00
,10.00—Six-room frame, near King's
«01 srv ".rickyard. A splendid house.
$*> 1 -'n Eiye-room frame, West Woolman.
$^l.o0—Four-room frame, with stable
near Star West.
$10.00— Four-room frame, on Nine Mile
Koad.
Vil - ' ^Eour-room frame. Anaconda Road.
$16.50 1 hree-room brick, near Parrot
school house.
$10.00—Three-room frame, near St. James'
hospital.
«re ™~7? VO lal ' Be housekeeping rooms.
$»-.00 —One store, close in.
$25.00—Five-room brick, furnished, West
blue.
Thompson Investment Co., 48 East
Broadway, Real estate, loans, fire insur
ance, rentals, Butte, Montana.
FOR RENT - FURNISHED HOUSE
three rooms. J. E. Rickards & Co., 48 E
Broadway.
FOR RENT IN PRIVATE FAMILY
suite 100 ms, with board. Lady prefer
red. Reasonable terms, 919 South Main
street.
FOR RENT—SIX ROOM MODERN
brick just completed, including water,
light etc., rent reasonable. Inquire
58 West Aluminum street.
FOR RENT — TWO CONNECTING
rooms, unfurnished, for light house
keeping, will rent very reasonable at
644 South Dakota street.
FOR RENT—STORE ROOM. GOOD Lo
cation on South Main street, cheap rent.
Will give lease. W. F. Cobban. 33 W.
Granite street.
FOR RENT —AN ELEGANT MAIN
street store. Enquire of J. H. Leyson.
22 North Main street.
FURNISHED ROUVli
BOARD
FOR RENT — DESIRABLE ROOMS
furnished. Reasonable, at 544 West
Broadway.
FURNISHED ROOMS 401 SOUTH MON
tana street. Hot air, electric light and
bath.
FOR RENT—FRONT PARLOR WITH
use of piano, reasonable. 212 Wes!
Broadway.
FOR RENT IN PRIVATE FAMILY,
suite rooms, with or without board.
Lady preferred. Reasonable terms, 919
South Main street.
NICELY FURNISHED FRONT ROOM—
307 South Washington.
FOR RENT—WARM COMFORTABLE
rooms, reasonable. Enquire 101 West
Granite.
FOR RENT — NICELY FURNISHED
rooms for transients, at 36 East Broad
way.
FOR RENT —NEWLY FURNISHED
room, with or without board, in private
family. 510 West Park street.
FURNISHED
month.
ROOMS — 15.00
207 West Park. CO
PER
FOR RENT—FURNISHED FRONT
room; housekeeping accommodations.
206 South Montana. Inquire side door.
FOR RENT — NICELY FURNISHED
rooms in warm brick block from $8 up;
pleasant location. Also light house
keeping rooms at 619 Utah avenue.
FREE BATHS WITH ROOM ELEC
tric light, steam heat. Mantle Block, at
16 West Broadway, near Clark's bank.
FOR RENT—NICELY FURNISHED
rooms, with or without board, gentle
men preferred; good location; three
blocks of Park street; car passes the
door. Inquire at 323 South Montana
Btreet.
FOR RENT—ONE LARGE. FRONT
room nicely furnished, including bath,
hot rind cold water, also electric light,
very reasonable. Inquire at C26 SouUi
Dakota street.
FURNISHED HOUSE KEEPING room*
single or in nultes to suit. Prices mod*
erate. AM cooking utensils furnished.
Hot and cold water, baths free. Inquire
53 W. Galena, soar Academy street.
NEWLY FURNISHED ROOMS FOR
Mght housekeeping, also pleasant fur
nished rooms with or without board.
Gentlomen preferred. 215 West Galena
street.

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