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Daily inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1881-1901, December 23, 1899, Image 14

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The Means That Are Advocated
by Many.
A FAULT OF THE LAWS
Criminologists of All Countries Will
Try and Devise Ways to
Treat Criminals.
One of the most important of the end
of the century conventions is one that
is to be held early next summer, for on
that occasion the greatest criminologists
of the world will meet together to dis
cuss the lessons that the criminals of
the country have taught. It is held by
experts on this subject that no centurv
p , «aaject mai no ceniuiy
has been more prolific in the production
of past masters in the art oi crime, and
that unless something is done to stay
the tide of criminality men and women
will become more and more exj ert in the
science of la.v breaking as the years
pass.
The fault, they claim, lies with the
laws that are now on the statute books
of the various countries, and they be
lieve that if new laws should be devised
—laws based upon actual criminal eondi
f Î
7
A r.
THE CONGRESS WILL DISCUSS THJ BEST MEANS OF 1 CURING A MAN
OF A LITTLE PRACTICE LIKE THIS.
tions and
j
.. , ,, ,
tions and an expert knowledge of crime
—it would not be long before there would
be a remarkable decrease in the number
of offenses committed. This, then, is th
object of the convention. The criminol
ogists of all nations will come together
and will inaugurate a scientific system
of legislation which they will afterwards
present to their various countries f
adoption. In urging the adoption of such
laws they will make use of the informa
tion brought before the convention, and
they believe that it will thus be possible
to effect many necessary reforms in the
statute books.
While the preliminaries for the con
vention have been arranged, it has not
yet been decided whether it shall be held
\
l'
DiReCToRj'^f^
This is proposed as a reward
TO THOSE WHO HAVE CON
DUCTED THEMSELVES
WELL.
In London or in Paris.The general idea
is that Paris would be the best place foi
the meeting, as many of the leading offi
cials of every country of the world would
be present in the city at that time, at
tending the Paris exposition. If they
could be persuaded to be present at the
sessions of the convention they could
listen to the discussions and would then
have a much better idea of the subject
when the matter should be brought be
fore them in their official capacity. While
It is not positively decided, therefore, it
NOTHING PUNISHES LIKE SOLI
TARY CONFINEMENT.
is more probable that the convention of
criminologists will be one of the gather
ings that will make the great exposition
conspicuous.
The problem of the proper methods of
punishment to be inflicted upon crimi
nals is one of the important questions of
the day, and upon no subjest has there
been such a wide diersity of opinion.
Lombroso, for instance, believes that it
is possible to discover the hereditary
criminal by means of his distinguishing
marks, and he holds that such a person
should be treated in the same manner
as a deliberate offender against the law.
At the same time there are many crim
inologists who blieve that crime is only
the result of early training and educa
tion. These two opinions represent the
optimism and pessimism of experts and
will undoubtedly prove to be one of the
most Interesting subjects of discussion.
Such theoretical subjects, however,
are not the only matters that will be con
sidered. The delegates to the convention
Itvill bury their individual opinions upon
Such debatable subject« to attend to
questions upon which there is more pos
sibility of an agreement. For instance,
there is a host of matters that have long
been discussed by penalogists that will
come in for consideration. There is the
matter of tobacco, the deprivation of
which has ben found to be one of the best
methods of bringing a prisoner under
subjection to prison authority, and there
is the question of indeterminate sen
tence and the parole law. which has been
found to be so effective in the prisons of
various states in this country.
The indeterminate sentence law means
that when a prisoner is sentenced he
goes to prison for a minimum or maxi
mum term, which is determined by law
in accordance with the offense commit
ted. It may be from one to three years,
—...... », „c ....... c.c V» ....w
two to fourteen, two to twenty-one, or i
any arrangement that may seem best to
the legislature. On entering a prison a
convict is placed in the second grade,
which means that he will wear checkered
clothing and will be permitted to write
one letter a month and receive one visit
a month from friends. At the end of the
third month, if his conduct has been
good, he will be advanced to the first
where he will wear clothing of
' ca(let b,ue and will be able to write two
I lettprs and receive two visits in each
! lv *onth. At the end of the term of mini
! mum sentence the prison officials will be
j nble to approve or disapprove his appeal
t the Parole board. If he has shown a
i disposition to reform he will be permit
*C „ ......, _________ ' !
K h*c wifi continue 1 B °Ï„ Ä
the prison, perhaps until the expiration
of the maximum sentence In the mean- |
ttnie if he insists on making trouble he
is reduced to the third grade, where he
wears the stripes and is denied all privi
leges, including that of being permitted
on read in his cell.
The successful application of such a '
law in many siates has led to the belief .
that it would be an excellent reforma- i
_____ .. , ,, ,
to. y measure if it should be generally
adopted, each state and country working
in union with the others.
Another matter that will be considered
is that of the proper penalties to be ap
plied to various offenses. There is a
growing feeling that the death penalty
does not have a tendency to deter mur
derers from carrying out their purpose,
and this is a question that will be thor
ouglily discussed. Those who are inter
ested in this matter are already engaged
ontpiling statistics from which they
expect to prove that life sentence is far
preferable from many standpoints. In
the same
of crime who favor a life sentence as the
penalty to be attached to armed bur
glary. In Ohio such a penalty has al
ready been considered, and a " bill pro
viding for its enforcement has been
drafted by Judge Dellenbaugh of Cleve
land. It is to be presented to the next ]
legislature, and the friends of the meas
aie confident that its adoption will
have a tendency to discourage the com
mission of such crimes. The theory of
this law is that desperate men with a
weapon in their hands would not hesitate
to commit murder to escape capture,
whereas such an extreme penalty would
have a tendency to make a man think
twice before committing his primary
offense.
Among criminologists there is a feeling
that there is something vitally wrong
with the statute books; that the only
way to discourage crime is to bring about
a complete revision of the penal code.
There are some who believe that the pen
alties are too severe when enforced in
discriminately. and there are others who
hold that there is at present altogether
too much sympathy with crime. There
are some experts who believe that the
w hipping post and ducking stool ought
never to have gone out of use and who
insist that the lash, the lock sten. the
striped clothing and the torture chamber
should still be encouraged. There are
some persons who e'verj uphold the
theory that tlie branding and mutilation
of convicts would be a deterrent to crime,
but they are exceptional. The general
opinion seems, however, to favor lighter,
but more scientific methods of punish
ment, a system of parole that will be in
ternational with the maximum penalty
upon a second offense. The Universal
adoption of the Bertillon system of meas
urements would make the detection of
the professional, or second offense crim
inal possible, and he would then lie sub
jected to the extreme penalty wherever
he might be arrested. If this system was
in operation the man who had become a
criminal by mistake or through the exi
gence of circumstances would soon be re
leased and permitted to prove his desire
to reform, while tlie habitual criminal
would be put securely out of the way for
a long term of years.
These are but a. few of the matters
that are to be discussed by the delegates,
but they are enough to show the générai
scope of the? convention. To criminolo
ists every crime tells a story, and it is
upon this intimate knowledge of crime
and its commission that they will base
their discussions, if there is no imme
diate change in the penal code of the
various countries as the direct result of
the convention the world will read its
discussions with interest, and the facts
that are brought out will have a ten
dency to make men wiser in the-* devising
of future laws for the government of
criminals and the punishment for crime.
BREAD ON THE WATERS.
1 nom many standpoints. In
way there are many students
vho favor a life sentence as the i
your mothf-r
Parson Primrose—Did
have a merry Christmas?
Bobbie—You just bet she did. She
bought *3 worth of |n i s-nts for h r
friends and got over *20 worth in return.
AGREED.
Mr. Pepper—H'm! I've forgotten as
much as you ever knew.
Mrs. P.— I know it, John. You always
were the most forgetful man I ever saw.
—Philadelphia Bulletin.
TBAGOWXS STRAIGHT FROM PARIS, THE PETTICOAT PLAYS AN IM
PORTANT PART AND IS MADE OF MATERIALS FROM MUSLIN TO
SILK. WONDERFUL ARE THE NEW RIBBONS.
Paris. Dec. 34.—Nearly every house
gown lias its petticoat which is a very
good thing for the house gown as it gives
L l *y ra , ce "'hieb Is not always assured
i , tbe . or !? sO'aigh't lines of the gown
can h attache ., to th „ siik .: oke The
,,, V n 1 i aee,J , K ■' °, ' '.', e
! flounces are of all colors and are in chif
which is all in one piece.
They are selling these petticoats, sep
arately. all ruffled and trimmed with lace
and needlework of all kinds, in the shops,
with applique and other decorations.
The French who are prudent in all
'.burtons and huttonhoies 'to the yoke,
| This is a fashion which has been adopt
e d for the silk petticoats that are worn in
the street but it is new for house dresses
jits object is principally economy, as the
flounces cost much less than ithe petiti
edat, w hen bought complete.
' The pale fade tints are the ones that
. are employed for house dresses. There
i is a positive fad for these fade tones to
j the almost entire exclusion of the brilli
jant hues which were chosen by Mr
Langtry as her only loves and were pop
ularized toy her. The rarest fade green
is fashionable, so also the lightest of th
pastel colors and the most delicate of
blue white and pearl gray.
Gauze in these pale tones comes thickly
strewn with violets, the whole so artisti
cally arranged that 'the material looks
as if the violets wye thrown there by ac
cident. Panne velvet comes with vines
straying over it, and taffeta has the most
beautiful floral patterns lightly traced
upon its surface in the natural colors of
the (levers.
A word may be said about the wearing
of the house dress. A teagown, so call
ed, is by no means a gown to wear in the
afternoon, for tea pouring. It is a morn
ing dress, of the kind known popularly
at home as a wrapper. In Paris a woman
of fashion dons many gowns in a day
cf twelve hours, and she can change her
I dress many times, without once going
lout of the house. In the early morn
j ing she wears a dressing sacque and skirt
of dainty design, but meant on.: y for her
! , ovvn room , or the family breakfast table,
; Then she puts on a tea gow n w hich is
i very pretty for luncheon. In the after
noon, when callers may arrive, she is
dressed in a home gown, which may be
called a reception dress. For dinner she
j wears quite a pretentious evening gown,
! But if she is going to a dance in the even
jing she will want to wear decollete. Five
! gowns will carry a w oman of fashion
] through the day at home,
j The fichu plays an important part in
j che tea gown - It-is one of the distinctive
i malks . of th . is particular style of dress,
Pal ' s modiste displayed to an admir.ng
trailed in graceful lengths. They wer
things have so arranged this matter of
the petticoat tlialt it is much less costly
than one would suppose. In all the best
shops of the Rue de la Paix they sell
these yokes of silk snugly fitted to the
nips and belt. They fasten in the back,
flat without gathers, and fit very tightly
as far as tne knees. On o counter, not
from the yokes are displayed the most
beautiful flounces, a yard deep, which^
...... . auiumiis
T 7 P a , ar ^ e l ™ n * snugly backed w ith
i ? 5 h . u , s : , a °' f '\ ete to be snipped
to London, as part of the trousseau of
very wealthy English girl. The fichus
were cut square from the new shining
silks, with that sheen finish which is
so beautiful. Flowers of all descriptions
eattered over the silks and vines
bordered with fine lac
These square
7
4
'Y
'oo££
A LUNCHEON GOWN OF FIGURED SILK WITH WATTEAU PLAIT; THUS
COAT SLEEVE AND ITS D ESIGN ARE HERE SHOWN.
fichus were to be folded around the neck
and caught at the front with a jewelled
pin.
Others were diamond shape with very
long tapering points that, when brought
to the front, would fall nearly to the
floor. They, too, were edged with lace
for this is the softest and prettiest finish
a fichu can have.
Then there were the three sided ones,
so cut that two of the ends were very
long and tapering. These were to be
tied uipon the bust in a large decora
tive bow.
; Quite novel was the arrangement of one
tea-gown. It was of taffeta glace with a
petticoat of fine muslin embroidery. The
bodice and tunic was iin one piece, en
Princesse, and were buttoned down the
front with enameled buttons. The tunic
was draped high upon each side indicat
* in S a return to the pannier shape.
Fringe plays an important part in
neckwear. It is used upon the ends of
long ribbon stocks and borders the half
handkerchiefs tha't are tied around the
throat.
It is now that difficult between season
when there is nothing new in actual cos
tumes, and when one must be content
with the small novelties of the season.
One of these is found in the remarkable
ribbons which are now seen in the shops.
It comes all widths and is brocaded, fig
ured and corded. It is also in open work,
set with insertion of white and black,
and fringed upon each edge. It is high
priced tout in the making of house dresses
it plays such an important part that one
can not ignore it. Bodices are made
of it, sewed together in stripes. These
rilbbons are also used for tunics, sewed
together in the same way. The seams
are pressed, not flat open, tout folded in
such a way that they look like tucking.
Another novelty is the graduated
fringe which is used upon all costumes
from tea gowns to ball dresses. It comes
in all widths, graduating from deep to
narrow, thus forming long points which
ate very graceful and much less formal
and stiff than the even variety.
Another of the season's novelti«* is
the new and vpry light weight ctoTh
which is so delicately made that it can
be used for the lightest of wear. Tea
gowns are made of it as well as the most
elegant of dinner gowns. We have long
had the cachemires, the nun's veilings
and the wool ohallies but this is of a
more sd': stantiaü tActU'.v» much like
ladies' cloth but very thin und soft. It
closely resembles cachemire. Sheen
cloth is the name under which one gown
of this material was. sent to America.
Yet the name did not seem to indeate its
even warm properties. This comes in
light rose, in decided greens and in the
soft browns, as well as in all the other
new and fashionable tints.
A few tea gowns recently made for
that most extravagant of all femininity,
a wealthy American woman in Paris, I
were so elegant that they brought form
many a w ord of admiration. 1
One could fancy nothing lovelier than
the one which was made of rose colored
Liberty silk combined with black ma
terials. The front was draped with
black lace put on in stole fashion. Black
velvet straps extended over the should- ;
ers. Black chiffon ruehings were taste- !
fully arranged upon the sleeves; and J
there was a fichu of black chiffon. This
beautiful robe was fer a bright chestnut
blonde who would find it a most fitting
setting for her brilliant coloring.
An Empire house gown of violet
f
focyduAn
ROOM ROBE ÜN FIGURED TAFFETA OVER A PETTICOAT OF CHIFFON
OVER SILK.
I
1
;
!
J
faille was exquisitely embroidered with
silver sequins. There was a girdle of
deep violet velvet and on the bottom of
the skirt were three very deep chiffon
ruehings. There was a unique and sub
tle grace to this beautiful house dress.
It was quaint yet modern. The very
dainty and pretty bolero of violet faille,
with its Empire collar and pointed Em
pire front formed the finishing touch to
its beauty.
Though it Is not always good taste to
dress the hair elaborately in the day
time, there was a bandeau of tulle in the
front. This was as much a part of the
dress as the girdle, for it came with it as
a part of it. There was a bandeau of vel
vet also to match the Empire girdle.
A very pale > me China silk gown was
trimmed with Brussels lace. The ar-1
rangement was rather unique. The gow n
was cut in flowing lines front neck to
hem; and the lac? was arm lied so that it*
extended in unbroken lines to the floor. |
One o-f the delightful features of this
robe was its fichu which was of the blue i
China silk with Brussels lac? set over it. <
A much more expensive dress than this
was of pastel creme cachemire embroid
ered in silver sequins. The embroidery,
'was very elaborate. Extending around
the foot of the skirt was a ruche of Lib
erty silk and double ruches trimmed the
Skirt in tunic fashion. |
Over this was worn a pink cloth Prin
cess tunic edged with mink. The cut of
this must be seen to be appreciated. Thel
collar was tall but there were no sleeves,
the large arm openings being edged with!
-the fur. The front and back were cut
very pointed. |
A room robe for a b" id? wa « in two parts
a Princess tunic and a petticoat.
The
A
d'l A
Û
oduABt
A TEA GOWN OF ROSE COLORED LIBERTY SILK COMBINED WITH
BLACK VELVET, BLACK LACE AND BLACK CHIFFON EM
PIRE HOUSE GOWN OF VIOLET FAILLE, VIOLET * . ✓
CHIFFON, VELVET AND SILVER SEQUINS.
|
petticoat was of white silk covered with
chiffon and edged with a very deep ruffle
of chiffon over silk.
The tunic was a beautifully trimmed
affair bordered with white satin ribbon
and trimmed with it. The square neck
was set in a yoke of lace over silk.
An old fashioned figured silk formed the
basis for a very tasteful luncheon gown.
It was cut in a Princess tunic with a very
broad Watteau plait of the silk falling
at the back to the edge of the tunic. All
this was over a petticoat of white taffeta
trimmed with ruehings of chiffon.
------- j
BRIEF PERIOD OF TRIUMPH. *
''Marla,
" exclaimed Mr. I!
filins
his
hair
standing
on end. "was
dial.
the
hired
girl
T heard y
ou talking to
in that
imper
ious
tone a me
intent ago?"
"Yes,"
responded Mr
s. B
ill us
. "î
told
her that
if she broke
a no
liter
dish
I'll
make hei
• pay for it
and
I'd
send
her
out of th
e house bag a
ltd 1
>a
age.'*
"Are yr
m crazy? Shi
u; 1 .
pave
you.
a 11 ti
I shall In
ive to tramp
all 0
ver
litis town
for a noth
er two weeks
to
^et
a no
ther
girl!"
"No you won't. John," exultantly re
joined Mrs. Billus. lier- face flushed with
the glow of victory. "You couldn't drive
her out of the house now. Site's saving
money for Christmas."—Ohio ago Tribune.
GETTING AT THE FACTS. \
—Yes. site is a woman who lias suf
fered a great deal because of her belief.
He—indeed! And what is lier belief?
She—That she can wear a No. 3 shoe
on a No. ti foot.—Chicago News.

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