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Daily inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1881-1901, December 23, 1899, Image 8

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P
FIRE!!
And Not One
Dollar's Insurance
A policy in one of our splendid
companies will enable you to
sleep nights and you know that
should fire occur prompt adjust
ment and treatment consistent
with good underwriting will be
accorded you.
REAL ESTATE, LOANS, FIRE
INSURANCE.
Iraient
16 E.Broadw'v
BUTTE, MONTANA
Brobeck
N
FED WE say "thank you."
for the orders which you
have given us during the past
year? No, tlie fact that we
solicit your future orders is
proof of our gratitude for favors re
ceived. Next year we will try to
serve you better than we have this
year, although just mow we can't
see how that can be. However, as
this is our last appeal for your trade
during 1899 and as we certainly
wish you well for the year, 1900 and '
a continuance of your patronage, !
we take this opportunity to be- !
speak for you a Merry Christmas
and a Happy New Year.
Gur line of TEAS in the best in the
maikèt at very low prices. 80c
Spider Leg Tea 60c: 70c grade 50c
per pound; 80c grade Gun Powder
Tea. 60c; 80c English Breakfast
Tea 60c.
In COFFEES we have no superior
although you may pay fanev prices
> ' u can get no befer qu . lity than w e
offer you for less money. Our plain
Santoes coffee have Mocha and Java
flavor, per pound 20 c and 23c.
Our HOFFMAN HOUSE is king
of all coffees, per pound 35 c 3
pounds * 1 . 00 . It is worth more but
it is our leader. Try it.
BROBECICS FLOUR Is increasing
in demand. Best of the best 30
pounds *1.15.
135 West Broadway
Prompt Deliv ery, Tel, 359.
>ÀAAAAA A Â* | «,ii ) . | . > . > rVV ¥ V vvvvv ^ i
Our line of Umbrellas in plain and
fancy silks is worth seeing. Have
blue, purple, green and red, in plain
and checked goods. The handles
are works of art. Some are in Ro
man color, richly chased, ornament
ed with stones in all the colors of
the rainbow. The long pearl
handles with engraved gold bands,
are very swell. These goods are
especially suitable as Christina«
presents.
Prices Range From
$8.00 to $28
We also have a line with Dresden
hanles from *4.00 to *8.00. Cheaper
goods from *1.75.
L
JEWELERS
main, Corner Broadway
,

]
j
j
I
j
I
Large
to
Western Orders Serve
Restore Confidence.
SOME ADVANCES MADE
The
Week Past Presented Trying
Conditions But Stocks Are
Strong.
In the face of the most trying condi
tions, scarcity of speculative money. Brit
ish reverses and consequent fever of
finance in :he London exchange, climaxed
by thf
of Boston, the bank of the Boston & Mon
tana and supposedly thick in th
, , ,
lailure of the GlobeJNational bank
meshes
of the Amalgamated web, the coppers
have shown a most surprisng strength,
and Butte holders, invarably bulls, who
have been holding their breath and put
..
ting up margins, are sanguine as to the
outcome.
One of the reasons for the steadines of
the coppers, particularly th^ Butte
stocks, during the panicky week just
. , . , . ..
outright. The fact lias been the ocea
j sion of much comment among Boston
brokers, and has done much towards re
storing the confidence of eastern buyers,
closed is tlmt large orders have gone in
from Butte and Utah for blocks of stock
the hands of brokers. |
For Saturday, with two holidays before
the re-opening of the exchange the mar
ket closed very firm to-day. Boston &
Montana gained a point during the trad
f . , ,,
ing. Bingham a quaitei of a point. Mo
hawk the same. Osceola three quarters,
Parrot and Utah a point each. There
were no losses. The closing quotations
were as follows :
AMALGAMATED.....
ANAl 'ON DA..........
■BOSTON & MONTANA.
BUTTE & BOSTON... .
B INGHAM............
CALUMET & HECLA...
MOHAW K............
OLD DOMINION.......
OSCEOLA............
PARROT..............
SANTA FE.............
TAMARACK.. . .
.* so 00
. 35 12'/
. 258 UO
42 00
10 50
715 00
15 00
18 00
66 00
36 25
5 00
170 00
UTAH CON..................... 24 00
Monday's Boston News Bureau says;
"The street impression a year ago, in
the calm that followed the Butte & Bos
ton—Boston & Montana contest, was that
Standard Oil people had bought the con
trol of Boston & Montana, notwithstand
ing the fact that the Boston News Bureau
declared that all the stories of controll
ing blocks of stocks having been acquired
by the Standard Oil people, were abso- ;
lutely false. j
We may as well repeat now that when j
the Butte & Boston people assailed Bos- 1
ton & Montana, they did not own more
than 5,000 shares of Boston & Montana, ■
notwithstanding the proclamation in
the daily papers that they were very
large holders, in fact, declared to be in
■possession of 50,000 shares.
After the settlement a year ago was
effected—a settlement which we believed
at the time, and still believe, will never
be carried out as respects the price of
Butte & Boston—the Standard Oil peo- !
pie became buyers of Boston & Montana i
stock at *225 and above, in fact, were the 1
buyers of practically all the stock sold
up to and above *300. |
This placed the Standard Oil people in
control of 14,000 shares of Boston & Mon
tana. With the 15,000 shares Air. Rogers
has just purchased from Air. Bigelow and
Air. Bigelow's associates, Mr. Rogers, or
the interest he represents, becomes the
owner of 29.000 shares of Boston & Mon
tana. Air. Bigelow is individually the
second largest owner. i>ut still repre- 1
sents far more stock than any other in-j
terest.
It should not he forgotten that the
Butte & Boston assault forced out more 1
than 30,000 shares of Boston & Alontana
stock from frightened holders. Mr. Bige
low and Ills associates purchased it all
at 225. !
The Standard Oil people certainly do
not own any more stock today than they
forced upon the market at that time." 1
Regarding the Amalgamated, the same
paper remarks: There is absolutely no
truth in the rumors of a settlement of the
Heinze litigation at Butte.
Mr. Heinze is said to be producing 2.- !
000,000 pounds of copper per month, or at
the rate of 25,000,000 pounds per annum,
and to be preparing to double his output
to 50,000,000 pounds per annum. It is also
said that he does not owe a dollar in the 1
world. I
Boston people have very little idea of
the size of this litigation, and it won't
,
j
1
:
!
i
j
!
i
!
1
do for those Standard Oil financial col- I
um ns whose Arcadian and Butte victims :
are now strewing the gutters of State 1
street, to attempt to laugh the Heinze liti- 1
gation down a side alley.
Mr. Heinze may be assassinated, but ;
that game won't long be found to work i
even in Butte. Some of his western news
paper defenders have already been I
threatened with assassination. j
I " !
Jg*. The "just as good" kind of goods
are not sold at Leys. They sell
only one kind—the best.. That's the
cheapest kind when it comes to watches
and jewelry. *
GUILD EXHIBIT.
The annual exhibit and distribution of
the new garments collected this year by
the Butte branch of the Needlework
Guild of America will be held on Friday,
December 29, 1899, in the Sunday school
room of the Presbyterian church, corner
of Broadway and Idaho Btreets, opening
at 2 p. m. The officers of the Guild, the
section presidents, directors and their
members are cordially invited to be pres
pnt ami bring: their friends with them,
that they may see the rock! work the
Guild is doing:. There will be music to
entertain, and the ladies of the Guild
will serve hot tea and wafers to all.
STATENEWS
A. P. Shulton. alias Klutchlnski, the
young Russian who was arrested in
Custer county on Thanksgiving day on
the charge of being a fugitive from jus
tice, and was taken to New York by
Marshal Ide of Washington, will have
to go back to his native land to stand
trial. The federal government has
issued a warrant for his surrender to the
Russian authorities.
John C. Van Hook, one of the em
ployes of the United States surveyor gen
eral's office in Helena, has been offered
a good position at Paris during the great
exposition of next year. The United
States government has tendered him a
position in the fisheries department of
the government's exhibit. Mr. Van
Hook has the matter under contempla
tion. If he decides to accept the posi
tion he will leave for Washington in a
few days preparatory to assuming his
duties in Paris.
Judge Knowles lias issued a peremp
tory writ of mandate directed to the
mayor, city council, city clerk and city
treasurer of Helena, ordering them to
pay forthwith to the Helena Water
Works company the sum of $10,00.3.83.
This is the outgrowth of the refusal of
the city to pay to the water company
l . he sum _ of *10,005.53 that was voted by
the people to be applied on the judgment
the water company has against the city,
The water company some time ago ap
1 plied to the court for an alternative writ
of mandate to compel the payment. The
city answered to the complaint and the
"»ter company demurred to the answer.
The city was given a certain time in
which to amend its answer. This is de
dined to do, preferring to stand on the
; ans wer. As the time in which to file
an amended answer expired on Thursday
the court issued the peremptory writ as
stated. T. J. Walsh, attorney for the
The report of the state arid land grant
commission to Governor Smith shows
"hat the commission hopes to achieve
' n another year and what was done in a
small ' v f y ( } urin ? ' h . e pas [ year -. T he
commission has had to contend with a
number of unexpected delays that handi
capped the progress of the past season.
Another year it is anticipated that eon
siderable work will be done, and that
one or two irrigation districts will be
, . , - ^1 • , . ' 1
completed, so far as the irrigating canals
n no r.nrir.ci'tio/1 r P l-> r. ouilonb I« IN
are concerned. The outlook in District
No. 1, Billings, is encouraging. The re
port as to District No. 2, situated in
Sweet Grass eounty, shows that the
Holland Irrigation Canal company has
taken the contract to perform the work,
is under bond, and has some work per
formed. Another season will see this
work concluded. This is the enterprise
that A. Wormser, the Holland emigra
tion colonist, is interested in, where he
proposes to build up a flourishing com
lnunity by the aid of the proposed canal.
In District No. 3, Carbon county, work
has been commenced, and it is expected
the canal will be ready to furnish water
early in 1894. In regard to District No. 4.
the new district created in the northern
part of Lewis and Clarke eounty, the
outlook for which is very encouraging,
the report says: "There has been segre
gated in this district 33,021.20 acres of
very fine land, and surveys for the
necessary water system made, the sur
veys and segregation having been made
without cost to the commission and with
a view of submitting a bid for construc
tion in the near future. This land is
situated in the northern part of Lewis
and Clarke county and adjacent to Sun
river. The soil is a rich sands' loam." ,
The financial statement shows that the !
debt outstanding against Nos. 1 and 2 i
amounts to about *16.000. The Billings !
district has received *1,000 and the Sweet
Grass *15,551.
According to the school census of
Lewis and Clarke eounty for 1899 there
are now nearly 400 more children be
tween the ages of 6 and 21 years in the
county than in 1808. This year there
were 5,166 children of school age in the
county, while last year there were 4 , 775 .
The big increase is accounted for in part
by the additional territory annexed by
the last legislature to Lewis and Clarke
county, but is due principally to the nat
ural growth of the population.
On Saturday hist the work of filling in
the bridges between Whitehall and
Butte, which had required three work
trains and crews, was stopped, owing to
the weather conditions, which are un
favorable to such work. The engines
and crews were ordered to Livingston
and most of them went there on Mon
day. The men engaged on the work were
somewhat disappointed at the recent
order, as some of them had moved their
families to Whitehall and expected to
work steadily all winter.
Something of a sensation was created 1 :
at Pony on Tuesday morning, when Dave :
Haekley. a well-known man of that
place, attempted self-destruction. He i
was in HYck & Sparpeli's saloon, sitting ;
in a chair, when, without any warning,
he took a knife from his pocket and made i
two bad cuts in his neck and a bad slash 1
across the front, just above his "Adam's 1
«
a I»pte." He missed the jugular vein, and
a l so failed to sever the windpipe. Friends
took the knife away, and the aid of
physician was called. At last accounts
Haekley was doing first-rate, with good
chances of recovery.
BUFFALO MEAT AT PAT MULLINS.
Chrismas at Pat Mullins, 110 West Park
will be a treat for the meat loving public.
Mr. Mullins secured two of the"seven
Buffalos sold in Helena. Anaconda and
Butte a few days ago and it will be serv- 1
ed out to those who want a treat. He
also has bear and deer meat, and a select
line of turkeys, lambs, ducks, geese and
a general variety of wild and tame fowls. '
Sweet potatoes cranberries, oranges,
bananas, figs, dates and mixed nuts, help
to make up his fine selection of f'hrist
mas eatables with his staple and fancy'
groceries. Come early and get your
choice.
Ç2. A diamond and a glass of ohani
■"aCf pagne are alike in one respect—
both sparkle. There is an extraordinary
sparkle to those *25 diamond rings shown
at Leys. ___
Judge Sullivan Takes Umbrage
at Dr. Alexander's Criticism.
NO TIME FOR A QUARREL
Says the Physicians Should Lay Aside
Petty Jealousies and Work for
the Public Good.
"In such trying times as these the phy
sicians of the city should lay aside their
petty professional jealousies and work
in harmony for the purpose of stamping
out the smallpox epidemic with which the
city is threatened. Their quarrel is not
in keeping with the nobility of their pro
fession, and is a menace to the public
health."
Such was Judge Sullivan's emphatic ex
pression this morning, and he said it in
a manner that left no doubt as to his sin
cerity. He said more. His honor has
taken umbrage at Dr. Alexander's criti
cism of the decision in the Hanson ease.
"1 do not propose," said he, ' that the
city physician shall use the police court
as a club against another physician. Dr.
Alexander's criticism, published in a
morning paper is rot, and is entitled to
no consideration, whatever. The court is
ready at all times to do what it can in
Six physicians testified in support of Dr
Alexander's contention that MeOants was
ill of smallpox. Of these medical men
several admitted that they examined Me
ttants through a window. Four physi
cians testified in support of Dr. Hanson,
that Mettants was not suffering from
smallpox, but was ill of pneumonia and
the eruption was caused by the adminis
tration of iodine. One of these men was
an expert on skin diseases. It was sim
ply a case of where doctor's disagree. As
«■ vci .tv v/i u uric U'R L"I .'i UlBd-UI cc,
to whether MoCants had smallpox
:. _ 1
pneumonia, I am in no position to say,
but in my opinion the city failed to prove
Dr. Hanson guilty of having violated ths
city health ordinances,
the ease accordingly."
and 1 dismissed
John Kenny, a vagrant, whose case
...WHY NOT...
"Sofa Cushions?
They Make the Nicest Kind of-Presents, and we have the
Nicest Kind of Cushions. Small, Medium and Large Ones.
Some at 50c Each
Some at 85o Each.
Some at $1.00 Bach
Some Even as Higlr as $6.75 Each
Rather a Steep Price to think of, but when you see them you will be forced to admit that if
you could and did make them the Price would be Much Higher.
Are In Our Big West Show Window
MARKED IN PLAIN FIGURES
At Prices to Hake Them Change Residence This Week.
Brownfield-Canty Carpet Co.
48 to 54 WEST PARK STREET, BUTTE.
MAIL ORDERS PROMPTLY FILLED. GDDD3 SOLD ON THE INSTALLMENT PLAN.
« VN ^V V SVVVVVvyyyyvvvyy yy ^.
S-A-NT-A. C Li GLUTS' LAST CHANCE
A Special Drive for the
Next Three Days.
Sterling Silver Novelties
At Qne-Fourth Off.
75c Goods for..................50c
50c Goods for..................35c
35c Goods for..................25c
Tooth Brushes, Cuticle Knives,
Nail Files, Curling Irons, Seals,
Stamps, Darners, Blotters. Etc.
Toilet Cases
In Silver and Ebony Goods, Fine
F inish at Reduced Prices.
GARTERS AND BUCKLES in At
tractive Designs and Beautifully
Finished.
WATCHES
LADIES' GOLD FILLD Watches,
value $15.00, for........ $13.00
WATCHES
LADIES' SOLID GOLD WATCHES
value $25.00, for......... $20.00
Gentlemen's and Boys' Watches
from $2.50 up.
BEAUTIFUL PRESENTS
RINGS
UMBRELLAS
CANES
SCARF PINS
SLEEVE BUTTONS
WATCH CHARMS
AND CHAINS.
TOWLE Sc WINTERHALTER
POPULAR PRICE JEWELERS. 28 WEST PARK ST., BUTTE
was taken under advisement by Judge
rmIlivan yesterday, was sentenced to 30
days m the county jail this morning.
^ hlldren s knives, forks and
spoons; silver-plated and sterling
silver, $1.50 to *7. *
EASTERN STAR OFFICERS.
At the regular meeting of "Ruth Chap
ter I. O. E. S. held in their hall Masonic
Temple, Dec. 20th, 1899, the following
named were elected to fill the respective
offices for the ensuing term:
AV . M. Airs. Kate V. Hogsett
W. P. Mr. Wm. R. Tonkin.
Ass. AI. —Aliss AI amie Innés.
Secy.—.Mrs. L. O. Marsh.
Treas.—Mrs. Rachel JeffeVson
Conductress—Airs. Estella Innés.
Ass. Con.—(Aliss Alberta Hammer.
Installation of officers elective and ap
»1 nt ive will take place Friday evening,
Dec. _9, 1899, at Masonic Temple, W. Park
street.
pon
Examine the line of imported and do
mestic perfumes at Gallogly & Co's.
notice.
The partnership existing between Mrs
Ivate Enright and Miss Mary McCord ha«
this day dissolved by mutual consent
Miss McCord will collect all bills and
pay all debts contracted by the co-part
nership.
Dated, Dec. 22, 1S99.
MISS MeCORD.
Diamond
*350.00.
rings, from *5.00 to
DRESSED DOLLS.
Davis & Weimescary company, 20 Main
treet give every one dollar purchase a
dressed doll.
Bookkeeping taught practically. Fif
teen lessons qualify, position guaranteed.
S. B. Loveridge, expert accountant.
Room 16, 115 North Alain street.
Leather writing desks, glove and
handkerchief sets, collar and cuff boxes,
traveling cards, pocketbooks, card cases,
etc., at Calkins'. •
k Gents' Diamond studs *5.00 to *350.
Don't miss seeing the holiday display of
china, cut class, decorated library lamps
and art ware at Davis & Weimescary Co.,
20 Alain street.
If you send your photograph in a pat
ent envelope they will go all right. You
can get them at the P. O. News stand.
, Ladies'
watches.
and gents'
* 10.00 up.
gold filled
Live turkeys, «ticks, geese and chickens
for «ale at H West Galena
Did you see those elegant dressing and
manicure sets at Gallogly & Co's. Prices,
low.
Saturday, Dec. 23, 1899.
Specials
E\ el j tiling tells of Ohirstmas; ex
tra clerks and extra delivery ser
vice; no long waits when leaving
your order and no short weights
when filling them.
pound, choice 12 1
. 13
TURKEYS,
fancy.....
CHICKENS,
pound......... ...... " y. :,
GEESE and DUCKS, lb........ 15340
NEW YORK COUNT OYSTERS
dozen..................
FANCY CELERY, bunch....... 7%c
OAt LIFLOWER, pound........ig 2
STRA W BERRIES, BA N \ N A S
BRIGHT RED apples' pa
IAWBA GRAPES, fresh and line.
oasKei.................
fancy na vel
12'yic. 25c, 30c, 35.
FANCY LEMONS.
FINEST
quarts.
ORANGE*
dozen...
CRANBERRIES,
doz.
.40c
PRESERVES. MINCE MEAT
PLUM PUDDING. CLUSTER
RATSINS, HONEY, DATES. FIGS
MIXED CANDY. 2 lbs.......... 2 uc
NEW MIXED NUTS, lb ......ir, t .
NEW WALNUTS, pound.......tOe
NEW LAYER FIGS, 25c package
for,
• 12VL.I
GROUND SAGE, 25 cent can for 10c
RICHELIEU PEACHES, mammoth
cans, delicious fruit, sliced for
cream, lemon clings, yellow Craw-!
fords, can..................;jj e
RICHELIEU STRIVE E R R 1E S
RASPBERRIES and SLICED
PINEAPPDES, finest quality,
can........................25c
STRICTLY FRESH EGGS, fresh
gathered in Kansas; you may pav
more, but you cannot get fresher
■stock, dozen... ............... ->^ c -
Cash Grocers.
47 W. Park St. Tel. 68
BUTTE, MONT.

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