OCR Interpretation


The Butte daily post. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1913-1961, January 16, 1917, Image 1

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053058/1917-01-16/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

WEATHER FORECAST
BUTTE—Toiright: Continued cold.
Tomorrow: Rising temperature.
WEATHER-FORECAST
MONTANA—Fair tonight and tomor
row; rising temperature tonight and east
of divide Wednesday.
VOL. 5. NO. 14.
BUTTE MONTANA. TUESDAY, JANUARY 16. 1917
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
IGHEST MEN IN FINANCIAL WORLD DRAWN INTO INQUIRY
ouse Committee Probing
Alleged Leak SutnmonsMorgan, Davison, Vander/ip and Others
AWSON IN DETAIL
HIS TALK r . '«REE-HOUR
CONFERENCE V»lTH HENRY
e Admits Broker Who Claimed Complete
Control Over Member of Cabinet Was
"In His Cups" When He Spoke.
'Unless Your Chairman Said What I Said He
Said, I am Guilty of Foul Perjury and Unfit to
Be Anywhere Outside of Prison," Declares
Lawson in Reply to Denial of Chief of Probe
Committee That He Had Told Witness of
Stock-Gambling Officials in Secret.
Washington, Jan. 16.—With administration officials,
bankers and other well-known men waiting to testify on
homas W. Lawson's statement that he had heard they
were connected with a stock market leak on President
Wilson's peace note, the house rules committee today re
sumed its hearings with Lawson on the stand. Secretary
McAdoo, who Lawson said he was given to understand
vas the mysterious cabinet member involved in his state
ment ; Secretary Tumulty, who Lawson said one of his in
formants told him was connected with the alleged leak ;
Paul M. Warburg of the federal reserve board, who Law
son said had knowledge of the leak machinery, and a half
ozen other men were waiting to testify under sub
poena or had come before the committee voluntarily. Be
fore Lawson had been on the stand an hour today the
cope of the investigation broadened to take in some na
tionally known names not hitherto mentioned.
On motion of Representative Har
Ison. democrat, the committee sub
naed J. P. Morgan, J. S. Rache,
ienry P. Davison, Frank A. Vander
Arthur Llpper and Sol C. Wexler,
11 prominent bankers. Mr. Harrison
id not disclose his reason for asking
or the appearance of the witness, ex
opf to say that he thought the com
might get some valuable in
firmât ion.
His Talk With Henry.
At the outset of today's hearing
awson went over his recital of how
e said Chairman Henry himnelf told
lm a cabinet member, a senator and
banker were In a stock gambling
>1. Referring to Henry's denial that
0 ever told Lawson any such thing,
Awson dramatically declared:
Unless your chairman said what I
aid he said, I am guilty of foul per
ury and unfit to be anywhere out
de of a prison."
Representative Campbell questioned
Mr. T.awson.
What He Told Publishers.
"You stated that when you left
Washington after talking with Chair
tna.i Henry that you went to New'
York and talked with several publish
ers. Will you state the substance of
whit you told them?*'
I asked them their opinion of w'hat
had happened In Washington," Lawson
Kan slowly, "and told them I would
like to get their advice on whether I
•hould go further or drop the entire
blatter. I said much more than 1 re
lated here yesterday. I laid before
th*m Henry's statement in the press
hat morning and called their atten
(Continued on Page Nine )
GERMAN STRATEGIST
GOES TO GREECE IN
SUBMARINE VESSEL
Von Talkenhayn, Recently
Commander in Rumania,
does From Kavala.
London, Jan. 16.—Tha presence in
Greece of General Von Falkenhayn,
former German chief of staff and
of lata in command of part of tho
force» engaged in tho campaign
»9»in«t Rumania, la reported in
French official quarters at Saloniki,
according to a Reuter dispatch from
that point.
General Von Falkenhayn is said
to have embarked on a submarine
at tha Greek port of Kovala, now
in hands of tho Gormans, and to
kave landed at a point on tho Greek
coaet, whence ho mode hie way to
Lari»,a. The absence of hie name
from tha official Berlin war reports
*'*• been noted for come days.
Previous maaaagas from Soloniki
said it was General Baron Von
ralkenhauaon, a member of the
German military command who
wont to Greece in 1915, who made
*k« trip In the submarine.
AGAINST FOES
ONTHESERETK
Bitter Fighting in Progress on
Moldavian Front Near
the Danube.
THE WAR SUMMARY.
The Russo-Rumanian defense of the
Sereth line in northern Rumania has
turned to the form of heavy counter
attacks, which are being delivered
both along the Moldavian frontier and
between Fokshani and the Danube.
The most ambitious attempt to push
back the Teutonic front was made
along the main Sereth line between
the mountains and the Danube, in the
vicinity of Fundeni. Russian troops
in mass formation were thrown into a
storm attack yesterday. The Teutonic
lines were reached, but could not be
held by the attacking forces.
Elsewhere there has been little
fighting, so far as the reports of the
official staff reveal.
Another report from a correspondent
with General Sarrail's army declares
the entente forces In Macedonia are
to be augmented preliminary to an
offensive which will have for it9 ob
ject the cutting of the Berlin-Con
stantinople railway running through
Serbia, Bulgaria and Turkey.
SWITZERLAND WILL
MOBILIZE MORE TROOPS
Heme. Switzerland. Jan. 16 (via
London».—Official announcement w
(Continued on Page Five.)
CITY HOSPITAL PLAN TO BE
INTRODUCED BY SWANSON
Alderman Favors Establish
ment of Place Where Sick
and Injured May Be Cared
for Free of Charge. Wants
a Free Maternity W ard.
Plans for a bond issue in support of
a city hosrital will be embodied in an
ordinance to he introduced before the
city council at a meeting soon by Al
derman Swanson, who has been work
ing on the Idea for more than « year.
The alderman believes a hospital can
be supported on the dollar per month
plan, and he advocates a place where
all sick and injured may be taken car.
of free of charge.
"I have been piunnlng for a >ear
to introduce an ordinance to provide
"BEFN TALKING THROUGH VOUR HAT. UNCLE?"

\v?' -
. v
liiiiipi...
-
\

i -,
i
j
I
WILL DIKE
Decision Reached at Cabinet
Meeting Today—Fletcher
to Go to Mexico.
NO FORMAL STATEMENT
OF M OVE WILL B E MADE
Secretary Lane Makes Final
Report on the Efforts of
Joint Commission.
Washington, Jan. 10.—Aftar today's
cabinet meeting, at which Secretary
Lane made hie final report on the
work of the Mexican-American joint
commission, it became known that the
withdrawal of Major General Per
shing's troops from Mexico and the
sending of Ambassador Fletcher to
the Mexican capital may be expected
in the near future. No formal an
nouncement is expected but the de
cision of the administration probably
will be made known through action.
VILLA FORCES TAKE
SANTA Y SABEL CITY
El Paso, Texas. Jan. 16.—Foreign
refugess arriving here early today
from Chihuahua City brought the
news of a battle fought yesterday be
tween Satevo and Santa Ysabel, south
west of the capital. The 1.500 Car
ranza troops sent against the Villa
forces were defeated, according to the
refugees, and they said Villa troops
now occupy Santa Ysabel. having
driven the de facto forces back to
Palom&s, 18 miles west of Chihuahua
City.
for the establishment of a city hos
pital," said the alderman this «morn
ing. "Butte is the only city of Its size
in the county that has not a place for
its sick and injured. The emergency
hospital is all right, but it handles
only emergency cases. I believe the
people of the city will heartily support
any movement ln this direction.
"The other day I heard a case of a
child being born in a house where
eight children slept in two rooms.
Every child at least is due a proper
place in which to be bo.rn. If this
hospital plan goes through I'll favor a
free maternity ward where children
will have proper surroundings when
born."
Alderman Swanson has talked with
other aldermen about his plan and has
been assured of their support.
MINES ALREADY PAY FAIR
PROPORTION OF TAXES OF
STATE, THE RECORDS SHOW
j
j
J
_ ------ ... » - _ . .
Pay Nearly $2,000,000 in Taxes in Montana, Besides Fed- j
eral Levy. Anaconda Company Alone Contributes Nearly a
Million to the Public Revenues. Why Mining Interests Will
Oppose Discriminatory Legislation.
i
That the owners of mining property in Montana pay a fair pro
portion of the taxes in the state is the assumption of those who will
oppose all efforts to discriminate against the mining industry by a
special license tax as proposed by several bills suggested by mem
bers of the Fifteenth legislative assembly; Facts and figures to bear
out this assertion will be presented before the senate and house com
mittees that have been directed to inquire into the subject of taxation
as it relates to mining property. At the meeting held in Butte yes
terday to plan a state organization in the interest of fairplay for those
communities dependent upon the mining industry the statement was
made that proof could be produced showing that the mine operators j
were bearing their full proportion of the burden of taxation in this
state under the present system.
__
!
Physicians Say He is Slowly •
DEATH MAY GOME 10
DEWEY IT INY MOMENT;
Sinking—May Not Live
Through Day.
Washington. Jan. 16. — Admiral
pewey-s condition late today was *'['1 ,
by his physicians to be "distinctly
worse'' and it was feared he would
not live through the day.
Dr. Fauntleroy issued this bulletin
■Admiral Dewey has »lowly declined
during the night and today. His lungs
are beginning to become affected.
Temperature (by axilla), 102; pulse.
120; respiration. 32. Hia breathing is
more lain)red and his kidneys de
pressed. Swallowing is Very difficult
and his general condition Is distinctly
worse.''
The physicians later added:
"The admiral is slowly sinking. The
end may come at any time."
IMMIGRATION BILL AGAIN
OP TO TO E PR ESIDENT
Literacy Test, Which Has Been
Cause of Many Vetoes,
is Part of it.
Washington. Jan. 16.—The house to
day finally approved the immigration
bill and it went to President Wilson.
May 1 was made the date when it
shall become effective.
Whether the bill will be vetoed by
President Wilson on account of the
literacy teat, which in similar bills
has led to vetoes by three presidents,
is not known.
The assessment of one mining com
pany alone in this state last year
amounted to nearly one-fifteenth of
the whole assessed valuation of Mon
tana. The assessment of the Ana
conda Copper Mining company for last
year aggregated $31,310,993, on which
! it paid taxes to the amount of $979,
• 622.21. Included in this company's
assessment was an item of $14.628.787
—the net proceeds of mines—which '
were taxed last year $483,750. All
other companies in the state were as- !
sensed on $13,976,568 net proceeds of
mines. Assuming that these other)
, oompanies and individuals encaged In I
mining were assessed proportionately
on other classes of property, it means,
that all mtnlnq prop.rtv of Montana,
Including net proceeds of mine», yield-:
ed last year in th ls state about I1.Ü00 -
000 in taxes. In Silver Bow county
(Continued on Page Five.)
„ I
^
PASSENGER TRAIN FREEZES
UP STA NDING A T STATION
Are Thawed. Coldest
in Several Weeks.
Day
Westbound Burlington Halted
. n .. r H iaiL.:i-.
in Butte Four Hours While
Air, Water and Steam Lines
While standing at the Northern Pa
cirtc depot at 6 o'clock this morning
discharging passengers, express and
mail, Burlington train No. 41 froze
up." and nearly four hours were con
sumed thawing out air, water and
steam pipes before the traiu could pro
ceed westward.
Butte shivered through one of the,
coldest days in weeks today, with the
thermometer below the zero mark
since 5 o'clock this morning. Con
turned cold is expected this evening,»
TAXES TO HOLD
It is Understood, However,
They Will Make Sepa
rate Reports.
HOUSE QUARRELS OVER
MATTER OF EMPLOYES
Memorial Favoring National
Prohibition Will Be
Introduced.
Special to the Port.
• elena, Jan. 1». —Steps were taken
»hi. .«.moon to dovieo a pbn to hear
testimony and receive evidence in the
inquiry into the taxes of mining and
certain oth.r corporation., authorizad
by resolution» paeeed by the eenate
land the house, it it expected th.t
the inquiry will get under way at once,
The house committee, appointed yes-,
terday afternoon, ha* employed three
clerk, to assist it. Th. senate com
ittee met this afternoon to discuss
the situati-m.
It la underatood that the two com-j
mitten« will in Joint session, but .
that they will make separate reports
to th»*ir respective bodies. While this
plan has not been announced, it i*
said to be practically agreed upon
It is known that the committees pro- '
pose to rail In many witnesses and
that they will go into the subject of
taxation as far as their authority and
time permit.
Still on Payroll.
By a vote of 48 to 42 the house to
day refused to discharge 11 attaches of
the cloak room who h;id been em
ployed as "clerks." A majority of the
committee on employes recommended i
that these employes be released, on ;
the ground th.~t there already wen
more than enough cloak room em
ployes and the law limited the number.
the majority report, and the minority
prevailed. After a ion« am sharp
hat*, th* quation «a* referred to the
Judlclary committee to determine the
Ic-K-al status of the employes added to,
the payroll.
White, favoring the
clerks that
Flanigan, of SIlv
night be employ*
Bow, chairman
these employes, sr.id that there were
altogether too many handsome girls
in handsome gowns standing around
tü.'eiöäk room.. The», empi
*aid. were purely ornamental
discharge ofi
and
were
ought not to be kept on the payroll.,
H. G lared that there were so many :
pretty women hantrln* around ln th* ;
*ul*e of committee clerk» that the
youns men of the assemble were be
comln* crosseved and that the older
fellows were suffering from eye-strain, j
Notwithstanding other criticism of this ■■
character the new employes were per- j
lifted to remain.
Bernard's bill relating to the rom
(Continued <
Page Twelve )
POPE CONGRATULATES
WILSON ON PEACE MOVE
- I
Message is Conveyed to White
House Through Spanish
Ambassador.
Wajhinkton, Jan 1«. —Congratula
' lons P "^ Benedict on the re
cent peace move of the American gov
ernment were conveyed to President
. . . _
wi,lon today by Juan P.iano. the Span
lsh ambassador. The pope sent -
suggestions for future moves The
message was conveyed through the
Spanish ambassador because the papal
legation here has no diplomatic status
w,th R rl,In * '«np.™ t°m™
The lowest point recorded during the
^ 24 hou ^ w „ u ^ low
peratures for the night vary in differ
ent parts of the city and on different
instruments, but 11 below seems to
have been the coldest in the city
proper. while it was between 18 and
20 below on the south side
There was a steady drop of the
thermometer from 6 o'clock last even
j n? . zero mark was not passed,
h owe ^ r> until 5 o'clock this morning,
The wave , s genera i all ove r the
country, ft is said, and is particularly
WV ere In the Dakotas and east of
Montana. There is little snow falling
| n west, the report goea. With
| he local barometer at 62.8. more cold
j 8 eX pccted, although the state wreath
_ _
<Continued on Page ' Ts »- '
OF COMMITTEE
BE REPUDIATED
Perkins and Colby Want G. 0.
P. Executive Committee
Action Rescinded.
NAMING OF ADAMS CALLED
AFFRONT TO PROGRESSIVES
They Turn Deaf Ear to Har
mony Overtures by Sub
committee.
New York, Jan. 16.- George W.
n c . r ,,
Perkins and F.veret Colby in a
signed Statement today On behalf
0 f progressives demanded a meet
; f h republican na
. " , ,
tional committee for the purpose
in effect, of rescinding the action
ta k en yesterday by the republican
. .
executive committee in naming
John Taylor Adams of Iowa vice
chairman of the national commit
te The statement expressed -
. , . r . .
i
;
wish by progressives to bring
about harmony with the republi
cans.
lira
e statement
Colby charge
taking over
party.
Mr. Perkin* and
the "old guard"
Ttrol of th** repub
Why Hughes Lost.
'Th. »täte* lost to Mr Hughe* last
fall." it said in part, "were Io«t pri
marily because independent voters be
lieved that behind the cloak of hi*
name the machine leaders who were in
control of the organization of the re
public^ party would handle it against
the public Inherent and for non-public
ends. The acth*! yesterday absolutely
Justlfics these fear* "
Another Harmony Move.
Progressive members of the repub
lican national campaign committee
were today in% ited to Join with a com
mi ""' of the republican national com
rnltt '"' ln th * formation of a aupple
mentar >' committee for the purpose of
bringing harmony between repub
l,can * * n,J progressives in the manage
t of the republi<-»n party.
Decline Invitation.
rkins and Col y late vesterday eve
n,n * issued a statement declaring they
must decline the invitation to a dinner
, .
: that *»' ' hairnun Wllleox to
; of the executive and cam
committee». They »aid they
took thl * lowing their pro
jthe »election of John Tay
!or AJama of lowa - _** vice c hairman
:
(C'ontinued on Page Five.)
AVALANCHE RILLS TWO
IN ALASKAN MOUNTAINS
Seattle. Jan. 16—Horace C. Emery,
aged 30, manager of the Martin mine
in the Willow Creek district. miles
from Valdez. Alaska, and Bert Stewart
of Anchorage were killed by a snow
slide yesterda y while they were visit
ing the mine, whl« h was closed for
the winter. Stewarts body was re«
covered, and men are digging to re
cover Emery'*» body. Emery was a
newcomer in Alaska, his former home
being Fan ton. O.
KING OF SPAIN MAY
BECOME A DOMINANT
FIGURE_F0R PEACE
Intimation in Madrid is That
Alfonso Will Play Im
portant Role.
Madrid, Jan. 16 (via Pari»).—An
intimation that th» king of Spain
may play a prominent part in th«
coming peace negotiation« wsi
given in a speech by Eduarde Dato,
former premier, at a banquet given
by the moderat» sect en of the con
servative». Great importance i» at
tached to the words of Sonor Dato.
He »«id:
"On a day more or less distant—
and. please God. that day may be
noar—the great prestige gained by
our king may, for the greater good
of humanity, make of him a mes
senger of peace. Let us have con
fidence, gentlemen, in the destinies
of our door land while ex p reoai n g
wishes fer the peace of the wer!«
and tho prosperity of Spain. May
heaven aid his ma j es t y in his n«Mo
and patriot»« aim."

xml | txt