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The Butte daily post. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1913-1961, February 05, 1917, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053058/1917-02-05/ed-1/seq-1/

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WEATHER jorecast
orTTE—Tonight : Fair and wanner.
nii-itrrow : Fair and warmer.
Œ ! yt Putte Hatlp $oôt
WEATHER FORECAST
MONTANA—Partly cloudy tonight and
Tuesday, warmer extreme east and cold
er weet portion tonight; colder Tuesday.
5. NO. 31.
BUTTE MONTANA. MONDAY. FEBRUARY 5. 1917
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
GERMAN OFFICIAL
KO HOPE .'•€ PEACE
COUNTRY AWAITS THE ISSUE OF WAR OR PEACE
WAR MEASURES COMING
FAST IN CONGRESS TODAY
>recautiovyy Measures for Safety of Government Military Property Are Taken
Dstructions to All Officials to Avoid Hasty
Action and Keep Strictly Within
Legal Action.
vemment Points Out It Has No Legal Right to
Take Over German War-Bound Merchant
Ships in U. S. Harbors—While Still Hoping for
Peace, President Causes Every Preparation
for War to Be Taken.
Washington, Feb. 5.—While officials refuse to ad
lit that Austria's formal announcement of her adhesion
(Germany's declaration of unrestricted warfare has
i received officially, there is reason for believing it is
r before the government and that appropriate action
\ being considered.
Washington, Feb. 5.—Carrying a provision to empower
»president to take over railroads in time of war, the
unistration railway labor bill was reintroduced in the
se today without the compulsory arbitration feature.
President Wilson at conferences today with Secretary
iiker and Secretary Daniels discussed expediting legisla
ion to empower the government to take possession of
tipyards, munitions plants and other facilities for hur
jing the work of preparedness if it becomes necessary.
Washington, Feb. 5.—While the United States awaits
" ! issue of war or peace, President Wilson has taken
ps that the-conduct of the government during the tense
riod of waiting shall be one of calm deliberation and
yond criticism.
tESIDENT CALL^PEOPLE
TO BE CALM DURING THE
TENSE PERIOD OF WAITING
fthe American government. It was!
officially, will be very j
Will to see that Germany and all
kr foreign governments will have no
|fcR cause for complaint.
Instructions to Officials.
General Instructions have been is
to federal government official«
I all pans of the country to avoid
Jff action and do nothing not strict
Ikleialand within the province of the
I •«ernment.
Tb« government, it was pointed out,
no legal right to take over war
ned merchant ships In American
"»ora.
•riel legal rights must be the basis
* the conduct of all federal officers
the announced policy of the
fhmment.
Adhere Strictly to Law.
■ J 10 what ocher nations may
I** to* present emergency, It was
|5^ that the United States will ad
* strictly to law and do nothing
watreag 0 f extreme which It would
- J* le * a! to do In ordinary times.
I «president himself, it w r as stated,
* P anlc o** haste and
officers of the government
|P likewise, if war comes he wants
^possible blame attached to the
ean government or any of its of
lB or people.
IM® Hoping for Peace.
idh 8 doping for peace, but tak
* J 8ry , Po68lljIe Hte P to prepare the
) for war, the president today
in «Tnf ,, t0 con * reas to quickly dis
like hui routine business, appropria
it !.V nd pend,n * legislation and
IKutUty * f ° r actlon to meet any
I lUct fn? l ? ent Wanta congress ready
lliddra.. ,* 0mea m ' cea »ary for him
1 again and ask for author
^ontlnue/i «
Tage Five.)
[Developments of a day
IN GERMANIC SITUATION
««> *>? «'*11 hop«« to avoid hostilities end thst other i<eu
»I Ik! L ,' olce * to that of the United States will unite the major moral
i,!", com P«> peace ln Europa. .
•••kiii«»* oft,ci **« deny reports that selxure of German war-bound mer
Sn»,.. .**, c °atemplated.
pin* will propose a special ratification of the treaties of 17S9
h * ki tk to ÎLAÎ* . l ' Blt « d s '»'««. allowing nations In case of war, nine months
• #lk Ger«, ' * 'î 1 * 18 af '*lrs and leave hostile countries.
S ii no. h, n ,, of . flcl « 1 *' expressing regret over severance of relations, say
^«hneot ,,r.L hop * of «voiding hostilities, as there Is no chance for an
ÜÜionii submarine order. ,
'UtMr » . ,roo P» entraining at Mexican border for home stations sent
I aloI >« the boundary.
"* «rtoa.U, ,°™ *h« senate endorsing the action of the president in sever
^NUB.,L V a ' lon « w *'h Germany.
.^hu, ®" »2 'he president forbidding American shipowners to change
*•* Istrodnr.i ,*, r «h*P« to foreign countries. ..
***' I» cue Of » d lr n boU8e empowering president to take over American rail
*5 I*. uïiL* de 'P hU «"1»" «afely I» Liverpool. Steamer Now York de
!*• fur America.
k.^ itfiant.L on * Russian ship soak by submarines. ,
1 r »ith , h,ve been «»de to sand Ambassador Bernstorff and his suite,
W^ssiado? r. "? ,n ««»««le. »«» In all, home vis Havana and Spain.
'^»Usport ' û rd '. '**•«>■ received his instructions from Washington to ask
He will probably return to America via Spain.
iE
AS CREAI LINERS
SAIL DANGER ZONE
Steamer Philadelphia, Cause
of Grave Anxiety, Has
Reached Port.
New York, Feb. R. — For the first
time since the beginning of the war,
marine Insurance rates on American
ships were today placed on a level
with those for ships of the entente
allies. The rates were advanced. It
was learned from underwriters, from
the average of 2 to 3 per cent prevail
ing last week to 10 per cent, the same
rate which has been in force for Borne
time on ships of Great Britain and
France.
New York Sails.
The American line received a cable
gram today saying that the steamer
New York, carrying passengers, left
Liverpool at 5 p. m. Saturday. She is
the first American passenger ship to
sail since Germany promulgated her
new submarine warfare.
The New York carried 281 passen
gers, Including many Americans. Shs
is expected to arrive hers next Sun
day.
Officials of the International Mer
cantile Marine officially announced
(Continued on Pag# Five.)
HOME OF COLLECTOR
OF NEW YORK PORT
Customs Chief Malone Re
ports the Incident to
Washington.
Washington, Feb. 6. — Customs
Collector Malone at New York re
ported to the treasury department
today that he had found a bomb
under the steps of his home.
New York, Fsb. 5.—Prior to ths
receipt of the dispatch from Wash
ington that a bomb had boon found
under the steps of Mr. Malone'«
home, a report was current here
that a bomb had been found in the
ouatom house in Mr. Malone's of
fice on Saturday. This report and
all knowledge of any attempt on f
Malone's life were emphatically de
nied by Deputy Colleotor Stewart,
speaking for Mr. Malone. He sold
a statement would be given out
later. A report wae current that
the Incident wae considered some
what as a joke by some officiale.
The bomb reported to have been
planted at the custom house was
•aid to have been discovered in the
room undor Mr. Malone'e private
office in whloh ho wae at work, It
wai said that employes had discov
ered it and extinguished its fuse.
bomb is found in
BERNSTOREE AND
ALL CONSULS TO
SAILVIA HAVANA
Party of 300 Will Accompany
German Ambassador Back
to Germany.
ROUTE LEADS THEM TO
SPAIN AND SWITZ ERLAND
It's Now Believed That Safe
Conduct for Party Will
Be Secured.
Washington, F.b. 6.—Arrangement,
are being made far nil German consul,
and ceneul.r official, in th. United
States to aocnmpany Count von
Bernstorff and the German embassy
ataff out of the country. The whole
party—more than 300 in all—probably
will go via Cuba and 8pain. At first
it had bean planned for the party to
depart on aoms eteamer tailing from
New York, but after further considera
tion it waa thought bettor that the de
parture be made from tome leu
thickly settled community
Under the tentative plans the con
suls and their families will go to Ha
vana by way of Key West, from vari
ous parta of the country, while the em
bassy staff will go directly south from
Washington. A Spanish steamship
large enough to accommodate all Ger
mans Is due to sail from Havana for
Spain Feb. 20.
From Spain It la planned for the
party to go to Switzerland, either by
rail through France or by Bteamer to
Italy and then by rail. In either case
Ufa conducts will lie required for the
party and probably will be obtained
by the United States.
Dr. Paul Ritter. Swiss minister, now
in charge of German diplomatic Inter
ests hers, Is conducting negotiations
with Assistant Secretary Philips of
the state department for the departure
of the German staffs.
The counselor of the Swiss legation
conferred today with Secretary Philips
and it waa said that the plana were
being delayed dhly while Information
of steamship and transportation facil
ities were being gathered.
FIRST PRACTICE AT NEW
TRENC H WAR DISA STROUS
U. S. Regular, Trying to Throw
Grenade, Strikes the
T rench With it.
El Paso. Feb. 5.—The first practice
In European trench warfare ever held
here resulted In First Sergeant
Tneslack of company I, Twenty-third
United States Infantry, losing a hand
from the explosion of a hand grenade,
and Private Walter Albright of com
pany M, the same regiment, receiving
Injuries from flying metai that may
result in death. Tneslack accidentally
struck the back of the trench with
the bomb in making a throw.
FIRST GREAT LINER TO
ESCAPE THE SUBMARINE

S.S PHILADELPHIA
Tlie steamer Philadelphia Is one of the International Meroanttle Marine's
American Hue fleet. The Philadelphia, with a large number of Americans on
board, was at sea whan Germany's note declaring for an unrestricted submarine
warfare was received. The ship docked at Liverpool last night. On Sunday
rumors were current is this country and Canada that the Philadelphia had been
torpedoed. An accident to tier engines delayed the Philadelphia more then a
day In making port. The New York of the same line departed from Liverpool
today for New York; City.
LITTLE CHANCE NOW TO
AVOID AN OPEN RUPTURE
BETWEE N U.S.AN D BERLIN
Position of the Highest German Officials is That "Unrestricted
Naval Warfare" is Germany's Last and Most Effective
Weapon to Combat Her Foes. No Animosity Toward United
States and Only Regret is Expressed at Severance of Rela
tions, But Submarine Warfare Must Go on to Save Teutons,
Berlin, Sunday, Feb. 4. (via London, Feb. 5.)—Outlook for peace
ful continuance of Germap-American relations after the departure of
the respective embassies at Washington and Berlin in the sense indi
cated by President Wilson in bis address to congress appears to be very
slight, judging by all the information, some of the highest authenticity,
gathered by the associated press. It was stated positively in high poli
tical circles that the German orders for the conduct of a submarine war
could not and would not be modified; that in Germany the determina
tion to enforce the prohibited zone order was absolute and final and
that the only security for shipping was avoidance of the prohibited zone.
Germany, eo the associated press
was Informed, resorted to this measure
after the "shameful" rejection by the
entente powers of peace overtures and
only after the fullest determination
and as the weapon In defense of its
threatened interests; Germany cannot
relinquish this weapon—the only one
promising a speedy end to the war—
reluctant as Germany was to take this
step.
The government had hoped that the
United States would see It In this light
OFFER RESOLUTION IN THE
SENATE ENDORSING ACTION
Democratic Leaders, After Consulting With Republicans, Be
lieve Measure Supporting President's Act in Severing Rela
tions With Germany Will Be Endorsed. Text Lays Especial
Emphasis Upon Executive's Desire to Maintain Peace.
Wa.hingtnn, Feb. 5.—A resolution endorsing President Wilson's action in
severing diplomatic relation, with Germany was Introduced In the senate today
by Senator Stone, chairman of the foreign relation, committee, empha.lz ng
particularly the president's expressed desire to maintain peace. The resolution
recited the severance of diplomatic relations with Germany and concluded by
declaring "that the senate approvea the action taken by the president aa set!
forth In his address to congress." Senator Stone requested that the resolution
go over for a day under the rules for action tomorrow and it was ogkeed to
without debate.
Republican senate leaders, among
them Lodge. Galiinger and Smoot,
wore consulted and It la stated the re
publicans will support the endorse
ment.
The text of the resolution follows:
The Resolution.
"Whereas, The president has, for
the reasons stated In his address de
livered to the congress in Joint ses
sion on Feb. 3, 1917. severed diplo
matic relations with the Imperial Ger
man government by the recall of the
American ambassador at Berlin and
by handing his passports to the Ger
man ambassador at Washington, and
"Whereas. Notwithstanding this
severance of diplomatic Intercourse the
president has expressed his desire to
avoid conflict with the Imperial Ger
man government, and
"Whereas, The president declared In
this said address that If in his Judg
ment an occasion should arise for
further action in the premises on the
part of the government of the United
States he would submit the matter to
the congress and ask the authority of
congress to use such measures aa he
might deem necessary for American
seamen and people In the prosecution
of the legal and legitimate errands on
the high seas.
"Therefore, be it resolve«^ by the
and was and is actuated by no anl
moalty to the United States In Its de
termination. Germany, therefore, so
the high Informant of the associated
press continued, Is very keenly disap
pointed and grieved by the terms of
Mr. Wilson's message, but the govern
ment cannot alter or modify the course
upon which it has determined. This
official added:
"We can only hope and trust that
American ships and American citizens
will avoid the danger zones laid down
In the German memorandum."
senate that the senate approves the
action taken by the president as set
forth In his address delivered before
the congress as stated above."
nil HIS MEN
M 1 B CH OUT Of MEXICO
The Punitive Expedition is Now
Back on American
Soil.
Columbus, N. M., Fab. 6.—MaJ. Gan
J. J. Pershing roda out of Mexico at
10:05 a. m. today at the head of more
than 10,000 soldiers of the American
punitive expedition.
General Pershing crossed the boun
dary at the border line half a length
ahead of his staff officers, with Lieut.
J. L. Collins, hla aide-de-camp, and
Capt. C. O. Edwards, hla intelligence
officer, riding next.
As ha crossed the line. General
Pershing saluted as the guards at the
gap In the barbed wire fence presented
arms.
GERARD RECEIVES
HIS INSTRUCTIONS
TO ASK PASSPORTS
American Ambassador Will
Return Home Via Span
ish Port.
Berlin, Feb. 5 (via London).—
Ambassador James W. Gerard this
morning received instructions to re
quest his passports. His plans for
departure are not yet completed,
but the ambassador has practically
decided to return to the United
States from a Spanish port. The
plan to have American interests
taken over by the Brazilian minis
ter hae been abandoned, and it it
not known who will represent
Amerioa in Berlin.
OVERRIDE VETO
OF PRESIDENT
Despite Protest of Japan, Bill
With Much-Vetoed Literacy
Test Becomes Law.
JAP EMBASSY RAISES
POI NT TO S TATE DEPT.
Government Officials Anxious
to Prevent Revival of the
Japanese Trouble.
Washington, Feb. 5.—Bulletin.—The
senate late today by a vote of 62 to 19
repassed the immigration bill over the
r eto of the president, despite a warn
ing from the state department that the
Asiatic exclusion section might result
in disturbing amicable relations with
Japan. The measure, containing the
literacy test, fought over for 20 years
and vetoed by three presidents, now
becomes a law.
Washington, Feb. 5.—New objections
from Japan to the language of the
Page Six.)
(Continued
IRE PLACED UNDER GUARD
Vessels Not Seized—Action is
Purely a Precautionary
Measure.
New York, Feb. 5.—Nearly two thou
sand officers and men, remnants of
the crews of 25 German merchant
ships which were laid up here at the
beginning of the war, are virtually
prisoners today on board their vessels.
The federal authorities explained that
the German seamen were "not forcibly
detained, but simply lequested" to re
main on their ships. Members of the
crews, however, who returned from
shore leave last night and today were
notified that if they went aboard they
would have to stay there.
Collector Malone of the port of New
York let It be known that his guards
were stationed to prevent the German
sailors from violating the immigration
laws by destroying their ships and
staying ashore without passing the
•ustomary immigration inspection.
Mr. Malone denied that the govern
ment contemplated "seizing" the Ger
man ships.
MONTANA CAVALRY TROOP
IN BUTTE NEXT THURSDAY
Treasure State Rough Riders
Leave Douglas and Are En
Route Home to Be Mustered
Out. Call for Militia Seems
Unlikel y Now.
Members of Troop A, First Mon
tana cavalry, who left Douglas, Arts.,
where they have been on border patrol
duty since August, last night, will pass
through Butte en route to Fort Wil
liam Henry Harrison, near Helena, on
Thursday night or Friday morning, ac
cording to advices received In Butte.
The troop will return home over the
same route as was taken by the First
Montana Infantry, to which the troop
was formerly attached, when the regi
STATE PLEDGED
TO PRESIDENT
IN WAR CRISIS
All Resources of Montana Ar'.
at the Command of
Washington.
WHAT THE SESSION
HAS ACCOMPLISHED
Farmers and Labor Represent
atives Not Entirely
Together.
Special to the Post.
Helena, Feb. 5.—The senate
unanimously adopted a resolution
offered by Senator Edwards today
communicating to President Wil
son and through him to all the
world the loyalty of the people of
Montana to the nation in what
ever development may come in the
international crisis.
The resolution pledges to the na
tion all resources Montana can fur
nish that are required in the present
situation. The resolution was trans
mitted to the house.
Not for Night School Bill.
On adverse committee reports th«
senate killed 3. B. 109, providing foi
night schools; S. B. 84, fixing the max
imum rate of Interest at 8 per cent;
H B. 17, providing for semi-annual
payment of taxes, and H. B. 71, pro
viding for free text-books were fa
vorably recommended, as was S. B. 83,
providing for the appointment of Gran
ville Stuart to compile early data con
cerning the state.
Among the bills introduced was one
by Jones providing for the revision of
the code; by Brower, abolishing the
position of steamboat inspector, and
two by the committee on livestock pro
viding for the consolidation of the
state board of stock and »beep com
missioners, and the rearrangement of
the work of the livestock sanitary
board.
The house was in session but a short
time and then recessed until this even
ing. Many members of the house ar«
in Butte attending the funeral of J. J
Flannigan.
Anderson of Fergus gave notice of «
age Three.)
(Continued
NOT CHANGE THE
VESSEL REGISTRY
President's Proclamation For
bidding it Says Emer
gency Exists.
Washington, Feb. 5.—President Wil
son today issued a proclamation, under
the authority of the recent shipping
act, prohibiting American ship owners
from transferring their vessels to any
other registry.
In his proclamation the president
points out that a national emergency
exists, and that many ship owners ot
the United States are permitting their
vessels to pass to alien registers and
to foreign trade in which w-e do not
participate "and from which they can
not be brought back to serve the needs
of our water-borne commerce without
the permission of governments of for
eign nations."
ment came home last fall, and wiU
make the trip on regular trains.
The order withdrawing the cavalry
troop was received several weeks ago*
and since that time the Montana boy«
have been breaking camp and prepar
ing for the long ride home. They en
trained at Douglas last night, going to
El Paso, and will go from there to
Tucumari, N. M., thence to Dalh&rt,
Tex., from there to Pueblo, Colo.,
thence, to Salt Lake and from Salt
Lake to Butte. The troop w ill change
from the Oregon Short Line train to
the Great Northern in Butte, and may
be compelled to lay overnight here.
Ninety Men.
The troop consists of 90 men, under
command of Capt. Everett Birely, who
was sec ond lieutenant of Company K
(Continued on Pa % %

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