OCR Interpretation


The Butte daily post. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1913-1961, February 07, 1917, Image 1

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053058/1917-02-07/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

WEATHER FORECAST
oittTE— Tonight: Fair, with frost.
KZ2£: Generally fair.
Œ! je Putte Baft? Boôt.
WEATHER FORECAST
MONTANA—Partly cloudy tonight and
Thursday; colder tonight.
VOL. y N O- 33.
BUTT E M ONTANA WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 7. 1917
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
JOBS DISSENSION IN THE SENATE
OVER PROPOSAL TO ENDORSE WILSON'S
COURSE IN BREAKING WITH GERMANY
' -
jj^X v orks Declares That If U. S. Had Been Really Neutral
ftum M °ver Would Have Been Forced Into a Rupture
%» With the Berlin Government.
i Vardaman and Kirby, Democrat», Announce at
I grinning of Debate on Stone's Resolution of
Approval That They Will Not Vote to Support
the President's Course — Other Senators Dis
approving of President's Action Declare They
Will Vote for Resolution to Preserve National
Unity—All Pledge Themselves to Complete
Support of Administration in Case of War.
Washington, Feb. 7.—(Bulletin).—President Wilson's
firrerance of diplomatic relations with Germany was for
stlly approved today by the senate. The vote was 78 to
h Senators who voted against the resolution were:
iDsMcrats, Kirby of Arkansas and Vardaman of Missis
lèpi; republicans, Gronna, North Dakota; Works, Cali
Ibnia, and La Follette, Wisconsin.
Washington, Feb. 7.—Dissension over President Wil
linn's breaking off diplomatic relations with Germany
stroke out in the senate today when Senator Stone brought
d his resolution to put the body on record in endorsement
LJf the president's action. Two democratic senators, Vard*
loan and Kirby, announced at the outset that they would
[lot vote for the endorsement, as did one republican,
Works of California. Other senators who objected to
I fte president's action announced that they would vote for
the endorsement for the sake of national unity. All, how
E wer, pledged their support if the country went to war.
[Senator Lodge, republican, probably the president's most
er critic in international affairs, pledged his whole
pport to the president's action, unreservedly, and called
ion his colleagues to follow him. _____
factor Stone's resolution; was taken
) tamed lately after Senator Works
wblican). in a prepared speech, had
tiled the president's course.
What British Believe.
Senator Stone began by reading a
sbli dispatch from London the day
Ai president severed relations, which
kltred it meant America In the war
• the side of the entente allies.
"A great number of articles of this
|hport," said Senator Stone, "have
km appearing from day to day In the
lâsrican press. Whatever may be the
Mult of this regret taiile International
ptoflsment in which we are now ln
Hived I do not know. But I want to
iprws my conviction and hope that
J w ® n °t lose out equilibrium and
I" off our feet, at least at the
IliftiDce of a foreign power or under
Jl influence of a propaganda put
jr th * or the purpose of exciting us
Ik war on the side of one of the bel
Ments, It Is n matter that must
barest on foreign dictation. No mat
1* we should take our
I course In our own way. *
To Uphold President.
l * ie officials and people of
wlnlted States will avoid any partl
I? *Mch calculated to excite pas
I presented this resolution be
we ought to let the world
t mt We 8U PP°rt the president
lZ .1 h ® ac,s wlthln his constltu
|klatry P0Wei8 and s P eaks for the
hold that the president is pri
fg Hir.| C iarg{ ' ( ' "'It* 1 the consideration
I 'Pwnatlc relations with foreign
^menta, and unless circumstances
Pfcj 5 ©xceptlonal should arise, I
*», ,. ,tra,n ' 1|i t0 support and ap
fcX of ll,e P res ident In dls
for< " len 'rol'aasailor or even
diplomatic relations put
n . tl " <1 , t0 ordinary measures of
. M°" a ,nt «rcourse. In this coso
I Z T lhe 1 resident has dls
[•naUnth Uty ' wlth constltu
KLsM 1 f " r ono feel that
tnowih. country and the
f hi* lhat we support his ac
*«nator Lo^.,.
.JContlnuM
ranking republican
_ nn p "It8 Fourteen.)
®0W INDIANS PROTEST
MAKE STRIKING APPEAL
R5** Men Tell senate
Denied Th Th ^ Have Been
GfnJ p eir R| 9hts. Squaw
:S^l«: 0ld Wa v of
# »0ecS. Tha ""' eNew '
Rureau.
** teopi e 0n or ^ b - '' Protesting that
Ï tPidet s, lr ' Ing to death in
Bj^ttc rÄ, locked U P b F
K"" Crow i nrti |lc . representatives
Eft Mo,. , h d an " 0( Montana a P -
»»a trau« T m,e Ind '»P com*
( ^ against the pro
SWEDEN NOT TO
FOLLOW ACTION
OF PRESIDENT
Scandinavian Countries
Not Break With
Germany.
Will
STOCKHOLM WILL MAKE
A VIGOROUS PROTEST
American Government is Still
Awaiting Overt Act by
Germany.
Stockholm, Feb. 7 (via London).—
Sweden will not accept President Wil
son's Invitation to severe diplomatic
relations with Germany. The Swedish
government, however, will protest
against the newly Inaugurated German
naval policy.
Sweden and other Scandinavian na
tions, It was announced later, have de
cided to unite in a joint protest to
Germany over the latter's submarine
blockade. •
NO CHANGE IN OASE
AT WASHINGTON
Washington, Feb. 7.—The govern
ment still Is waiting for some act of
Germany which might make relations
suddenly - more serious, hut It was
stated last night after the cabinet
meeting that nothing had occurred to
chnnge that attitude. The next step
of the United States, If one should be
necessary, will be taken without ad
dressing any communication to Ger
(Contlnued on Page Fourte en.)
posed opening of the Crow reservation
to white settlers, and also against the
senate bill authorizing the proposed
power and Irrigation dam to be erect
ed In the Big Horn River canyon with
out recompense to the Indians who
own the power site. ,
The Big Horn project Is one of the
largest water-power possibilities in the
west. The dam Is expected to develop
194,000 horsepower and the project is
said to be Included In the general
scheme of electrifying the Burlington
railroad. The senate bill taking this
valuable property away from its In
dian owners divides the payment for
the site and the future lease revenues
equally between the state of Montana
(Continued on Page Six.)
DECIMES PIRE
OF TOE BUMF
RESTS WITH US
Would Have America Keep Her
Ships and People Out of
Danger Zone.
RIGHTS ARE VIOLATED
BY B OTH BELLIG ERENTS
Government Must Assume Re
sponsibility of Aiding
Germany's Foes.
Washington, Feb. 7.—Asserting
that the United States has not
been neutral as a nation and that,
if it had been, the country never
would have been brought to a
breach with Germany, Senator
Works, republican of California
protested in the senate today
against the action of the president
in severing diplomatic relations
He declared the government is act
ing on the policy that Americans
have an inalienable right to travel
the high seas, that the German
submarine blockade is entirely il
legal and that any sinking of
American ships in contravention
of law would immediately lead to
hostilities.
No Question of Good Faith.
Senator Works said he did not ques
tion the good faith of the president
and gave him credit for "conscientious
motive and patriotic purposes," but he
protested "against this or any other
movement that tends toward war with
Germany for no greater cause than has
yet been given us."
"I insist," said the senator, after re
viewing the German negotiations and
the president's determination to uphold
American rights on the seas, "that
neither a private conclusion nor the
president nor congress can be justified
in driving this nation Into war or en
dangering Its peace by any such false
sense of courage or national prestige
or dignity."
Some Blame on U. S.
Reviewing the Lusitania case at
length and branding It as a "cruel and
unjust wrong to our people and to the
nation,"- the senator said It was well
(Continued on Page Five.)
3,749 REFUGEES
CAME OUT WITH
THE U.S.TI
War Department Commends
Work of Pershing and
Funston.
Washington, Fob. 7.—High com
mendation for the work of the army
on the border and In Mexico is ex
pressed by Secretary Baker In letters
to Major General Funston, command
ing the border forces, and Major Gen
eral Pershing, who commanded the
punitive expedition Just returned to
American territory.
General Pershing will take command
at El Paso and distribution of the force
he commanded In Mexico will be under
the direction of Brigadier General
Swift at Columbus. The force will be
divided among 14 stations from Yuma.
Arts., to a point near the eastern end
of the border.
General Pershing today reported at
Columbus 3,749 refugees who accom
panied the force from Mexico. Lieu
tenant Ord, in charge of the refugees,
alrendy has found employment for
about half of them and he bellevCB he
will be able to find work for the
others. Pershing reports he expects
no difficulty In their disposition.
Of the refugees there are 1,830 Mex
icans, 838 of whom are men, 374 wom
en and 623 children. There are 197
Americans, 80 men. 49 women and
68 children. The Chinese, numbering
622, will be held temporarily.
BLOCKADE ZONE ANNOUNCED BY GERMANY
THAT BROUGHT RUPTURE WITH THE U. S.
CW
TORK
X
ATLANTIC
O C BAN
TCP 1
iXHELLI
FAi
it cd
The map shows the increased blockade zone around Grea t Britain which Germany, in her lutest note to the 1
States, has determined upon as lhe district of her submarine warfare. From this it may be noticed nil trans-Atlantic
lines to European countries north of Spain arc endangered by the new campaign. Falmouth is the British port to
which America was allowed to send one liner a week. It was the determination to Inaugurate this new campaign of
unrestricted submarine warfare that led to the break In dl plomatic relations between the I'nlted States nnd Germany.
The German note to the United States set out another danger zone to neutral shipping not shown in the map. This
in the Mediterranean sea.
NO CONVOYS FOR MERCHANT SHIPS
DECISION OF U. S. NAVY DEPARTMENT
GERARD REPORTED SAFE
IN SWITZERLAND BY U. S.
AMBASSADOR IN MADRID

Ambassador Willard in Spain Notifies State Department That
He Has Receiv ;d a Message Ffom the Former Ambassador
to Germany D: ted at the Swiss Capital. Germany Anxious
Over Safety of Bernstorff When His Ship Traverses British
Blockade Distr ct.
Washington, Ffeb. 7.—Ambassador Willard at Madrid reported to
the state department today that he had received a dispatch from Am
bassador Gerard, sent from Berne, Switzerland. Although no word
came from Ambassador Gerard himself or from American Minister
Stovall at Berne t'.i€ state department interpreted Mr. Willard's dis
patch as indicating that Mr. Gerard had left Berlin and gotten as far
as the Swiss capital.
The fact that Mr. Gerard was not
expected to leave Berlin before Sun
day, coupled with the possibility that
he may have sent a dispatch to Berne
to be transmitted to Ambassador Wil
lard, makes It possible, however, that
Mr. Gerard has not left Germany, but
officials expect further advices during
the day.
Report From Europe.
From European sources outside of
Germany the government has learned
that the German government actually
did consider Mr. Gerard practically as
a hostage until It received messages
from Washington giving the details
made for the safe departure of Count
von Bernstorff.
It was disclosed today that on Mon
day the state department sent a long
dispatch giving the plans worked out
for the safe departure of the former
German ambassador and his suite. Any
plans German officials might have en
tertained to detain the departure of
Mr. Gerard were then, of course,
dropped.
The German government's action is
(I'nntinuud on Page Four.)
MM VESSELS FILL PREY
IN THE SUBMARINE ZONES
One Italian and a Peruvian
Boat Among Those Sent
to the Bottom.
Washington, Feh. 7.—Sinking of the
British passenger liner California,
New York for Glasgow, off the coast
of Ireland, was reported to the stale
department late today In a dispatch
from Consul Frost at Queenstown.
The report said there was one life
lost and "two hundred hospital cases"
and gave no other details of the ca
tastrophe.
London, Feb. 7 (1:30 p. m.).—Lloyd's
announces the following ships reported
sunk:
British steamer Vestra, of 1,021 tons
tons gross.
Peruvian bark Lorton, of 1,419 tons
gross
Italian steamer Ferruccio, of 2,192
tons gross.
Two British steam trawlers.
Two fishing boats.
Two lives were lost from the British
steamer Wartenfels, of 4,611 tons, re
ported sunk yesterday, the agency also
announces.
The British steamers St. Ninlan and
Corsican Prince were sunk today.
PERUVIAN SHIP SENT DOWN
IN SPANISH WATERS
London. Feb. 7.—The Peruvian sail
ing vessel Lorton, while on a voyage
from Callao, Peru, was sunk by a Ger
man submarine on Monday Inside
Spanish territorial waters, according I
to a statement Issued today.
1
OE PARLIAMENT
Monarch Declares Entente Al
lies Are Steeled to Great
Determination.
London, Feb. 7.— King George, in
opening parliament today, said that
the response of the allies to the in
vitation of the president of the United
States outlined their alms as far as
could be done at present. The king
added :
"Threats of further outrages upon
public order and the common rights
of humanity serve to steel our deter
mination."
The opening of parliament, always
picturesque, was shorn of much of its
color and pomp. The peers wore none
of the customary robes and regalia.
The king was clad in the uniform of
an admiral of the fleet, and all the
lords and members of the house of
commons which are entitled to wear
either khaki or navy blue followed the
example of the king. There were also
other Innovations in keeping with the
time of war. The Imperial escort con
sisted of officers of the overseas fight
ing force. The royal gallery In the
(Continued on Page Three.)
the minute after Gov
STEAMER IN ft RAGE TO
BEIT "BONE DBr LAW
Effort Made to Reach Portland
Before Law Becomes Ab
solute Today.
Portland, Ore., Feb. 7.—Racing
against time the steamer F. A.' Ktl
burn started up the Columbia river
from Astoria under forced draught
early today in an endeavor to reach
Portland and deliver several liquor
shipments aboard before the Oregon
"bone dry" law becomes absolute at
4 o'clock this afternoon, according to
reports from Astoria. The trip up
takes about eight hours.
On the trip from San Francisco
Captain McLellen of the Kilburn did
not hurry, as he believed midnight to
night was the "dead line'' for liquor
shipments. At Astoria a message from
District Attorney W. H. Evans, Port
land. told him the consignments must
be delivered by' 4 o'clock, five days to
James Withy
combe signed the bill.
HKU£ STATEMENT
No Attention Will Be Paid to
German Blockade
Order.
OVERT ACT ALONE WILL
LEAD T O FURTHER ACTION
Shipowners Show Increasing
Disposition to Keep Ve„
sels in Port.
Nsw York, Fob. 7.—The International
Mercantile Marine today sent out in
structions to its agents throughout the
country requesting them
booking passengers on American line
ships.
Although there has been no cancel
lation of sailings of British or allied
ships from Amerioan porta it was
Isarned here today that the British
consulate is refusing to issue passports
for women and ohildren on ships des
tined to pass through the war zone.
No formal notice has been issued but
applications for women and children
are refused.
Washington, Feb. 7.—The American
linsr St. Louis will not be given a con
voy if she decides to sail for England
through the German submarine zone,
it was announced at the stato depart
ment today. A statement of the po
sition of the government on the sail
ing of American vessels is being drawn
up at the state department but will
not be made public here, although it
may be made public by ship owners I
receiving it. It is understood to be I
President Wilson's desire not to have
the government appear to go out of
its way to make an official public an
nouncement on the question.
It is also stated that as yet no ship
pers have made "a direct request" for
a convoy. It Is understood, however,
that the question has been discussed
Informally and that it has
learned that there are
American war vessels
convoy the
been 1
not enough !
ailable to |
hole Amerioan merchant j
ar zone.
marine plying through the
Today's announcement is under
stood to mean that the United States
is going ahead Just as though the Ger
(Contl nued on Tage Nine.)
BOY BURGLARS CONFESS
7-YEAR-OLD SELLS WATCH
Pawnbroker is Fined $50 for
Buying Stolen Property From
Youngest of the Trio That,
■ I . no , ^ . ..
Had Planned the Systematic
Robbing of Women.
Burglaries committed during the
past week by three boys, 7, 9 and 11
years old, were disclosed this morning
In police court when R. Scheer, a
pawnbroker, was fined $50 for buying
a stolen watch from the youngest of
the trio. Detective Joe Williams made
the arrests of the boys and he said
that all had confessed and that now
the three youthful bandits are In the
industrial school.
Money and valuables were taken
from the Maki company store at 444
East Broadway. The boys picked the
lock on the back door In a style that
». J. MITTS NAMED
TO SUCCEED J. J.
FUIICM III HOUSE
Governor Calls a Special Elec
tion Feb. 19 to Fill
Vacancy.
TRADING STAMP BILL
KILLED BY SENATE
Notice Given of Measure to Bi
furcate Sessions of the
Legislature.
Special to the Post.
Helena, Feh. 7.—Gov. S. V.
Stewart today appointed William
J. Cutts of Silver Bow county a
member of the legislature to fill
the vacancy caused by the death of
Jerry J. Flanigan and issued a
proclamation calling a special elec
tion in Silver Bow county Feb. 19
to fill the vacancy.
The communication from the gov
ernor was read in the house. Mc
Mahon moved It be referred to a stand
ing committee; Itlgglns that It he re
ferred to the Judiciary committee. The
Higgins motion was lost and the orig
inal carried. Speaker O'Connor hat
not announced the committee.
Judge of Own Members.
The governor made the appointment
pursuant to section 423, revised codes
The house, however, is the Judge of it?
own members, and need not admit Mr
Cutts unless it so desires. Several
years ago a vacancy occurred in the
Madison county delegation and a spe
cial election was called by the gov
ernor. The county commissioners
however. Ignored the order for th*
special election and Madison was one
shy during the session.
Dry Bill Rereferred.
After spending nearly two hours
considering S. R. 7.Ô, by Annin, a dras
tic measure providing for the enforce
ment of prohibition, the senate today
re-referred the bill to the committee
on Judiciary on motion of Dwight.
In making his motion he said he was
In favor of a bill for the enforcement
of prohibition, but that the Annin bill
was not of that kind: that ft would
open the gates to all kinds of expense,
litigation and persecution, as well as
prosecution. He further characterized
It «as poorly draw*n and Illy considered.
Annin opposed the motion, saying
the bill was a compilation of those
provisions of the laws of other states
that had been passed upon by the
courts.
After the committee of the whole
arose Annin tried to change the report
as regards H. B. 75. but lost out on a
roll call vote of 15 to 21.
S. B. 58. creating Wheatland county,
(Continued on Page Twelve.)
I 25.—(Con
I elated press.)
300 PERISH ON CHINA
COAST IN SHIPWRECK
Jap Steamer Goes Ashore and
Only 75 Persons Are
Rescued.
Chefoo, Shantung Province, China,
spondence of the asso
Three hundred persons
suffered death by drowning or freez
ing on the Japanese steamer llankaka,
which ran aground during a terrific
snowstorm near this city.
Through the heroic effort of Cap
tain Stampe, a Dutch officer connected
with The Netherlands Harbor Im
provement company, 75 of the passen
1 sers and crew who clung to the storm
! swept ship for four days and survived
| * ow temperature were finally res
j cu ®d
The llankaka was a Japanese ship of
800 tons which had plied for years
between Dalny and Chefoo. It left
Dalny on Its Christmas trip with more
than 300 Chinese and Japanese pas
sengers and a crew of nearly 100.
" u oul 1 d ar d s ° credlt to ,he most expert ot
Monday night the trio entered a
<lKar !,tore on<1 poolroom at 436 East
Broadway. Several watches, stick
pins and a revolver were taken from
this place.
"We wanted a gun to hold up the
women," said one of the little fellows.
"Women get scared easy and would
shell out without much trouble. We
were pinched before we got around to
that," he finished.
Evidence showed that the youngest
of the boys came to the pawnbroker
with a sliver watch. The pawnbroker
said he wouldn't buy without the con
sent of the hoy's mother. Then the
little fellow went around the corner,
where his companions were waiting.
The oldest of these hastily wrote out a
note, w'hich the boy returned to the
pawnbroker with the watch. He got
$3 and immediately divided . p with
hla com nan ions.

xml | txt