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The Butte daily post. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1913-1961, February 08, 1917, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053058/1917-02-08/ed-1/seq-1/

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WEATHER FORECAST
mîTTE-T.mlrbt: Fair, little chenge.
Sorrow: Fair. little chan«..
ISutte üatlp 3oüt.
WEATHER FORECAST
MONTANA—Generally fair tonight and
Friday; not much change In temperature.
VOL- i- NO. 34.
BUTTE MONTANA, THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 8. 1917
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
WBASC 'hOR GERARD AND CONSULS STILL DETAINED IN GERMAN CAPITAL!
0 f^ r __ """"""", .. ..... —^i— i. m — ii ■ ■ . — ........... ■ i. — — —- ■ .. .......... » I ■■
rlin Wa. ' to Be Satisfied as to the Safety of Bemstorff Before Departure
UN REARS EXOTING
WORTS THAT GERMAN
SKirS HAYE BE ER SEIZED
ishingten Minimizes Importance of Deten
tion of American Officials Because Action
Is Due to Misunderstanding.
wterday'» Report That Gerard Had Arrived at
Berne, Switzerland, Is Found to Be Untrue.
Americans Taken as Prisoners on Prize Ships
Alio Are Held in Berlin Pending Develop
ments—Berlin Newspapers, Misinformed as to
Situation in America, Charge That the United
States Has Violated Provisions of the Treaty
With Germany. _
SAFE PASSAGE FOR BERNSTORFF
Washington, Feb. 8.—France has formally granted safe
pgige through the allied blockade for Count von Bern
f snd his suite. Notice that Great Britain also has
ted safe conduct for Count von Bemstorff and his
"f was received later at the state department.
Washington, Feb. 8.—Ambassador Gerard, American
a and the American sailors brought in on the prize
Yarrowdale are being held in Germany until assur
have been received from here as to the safe depar
of Count von Bemstorff and the German consuls and
safety of German warbound ships in this country,
issador Gerard is still at Berlin and not at Berne,
Irland, as was reported yesterday. It was said at
state department today that sensational reports have
:me current in Germany that the German ships here
e been confiscated and their crews seized. Pending
irmation, Germany has detained the A meric an s.
Officials here are Inclined to mini- 1
irmation, Germany
Officials here are Inclined to mini- 1
I the Importance of the detention
k they believe It largely has
I from a misunderstanding and
will be stniitfhtened out.
Probably 150 American« are af
I in the American embassy at
i and the 22 consulates In Ger
, the 4 in Belgium and the 1 at
NY REQUIRES
SAFETY GUARANTEES
Umdon, Feb. 8.—The German gov
■mtnt will require guarantees
W Count von Bemstorff, former Ger
5 ambassador at Washington, and
Mmen on German ships in American
** will be permitted to leave the
MnJ States before allowing Ambaa
br Gerard and other Americana In
to depart from that country,
ng to Copenhagen Politiken, as
i In a Reuter dispatch from that
TUi Information, the Politiken says,
J®«talned in a telegram sent by Mr.
JJJjjrt to the American legation at
All Americans in Ger
, Including those captured by the
raider and taken to Germany,
to have been detained as
b Exchange Telegraph dispatch
°P€nhagen gives the same ré
rtfardlng the detention of Amer
Germany and adds that Mr.
, u not permitted to send tele
in code.
to London Papers.
re P°* ting that Germany
bm i n f. G *rard and all Amer
Germany as hostages for the
, of C°unt von Bemstorff
,***• number of Germans
nu other news In the London
Papers today. Talk in the
. became focussed on pos
Uant developments,
antral opinion here was that
jr-inllnu»^
I'.ykb Three.)
ontana cavalrymen to
arrive in butte Today
*ith!L of T n 00p A ' Recently
Ji aw "F, r °m the Border
fife Win Stop in City
r; Night, En Route to Fort
'"•4 m * n an< * * our f
Ä:r ,T - A '^
1 botfc.
om
. ____ cav
which was attached
Montana regiment on
«( T.', rlve ln Butte this
_ -™,l , oclock over the Ore
they ha .„ Douglas. Artx^
The sta *loned since
'Short 1 0C|<W
1ELIEKSKMM
SHIPS HIVE BEEN
SEIZED B) U. S.
German Newspaper Charges
America With a Break of
Treaty Obligations.
Berlin, Feb. 7 (via London, Feb. 8).
—In a prominently displayed leader
the Lokal Anzeiger this afternoon
chargee the United States with a
breach of treaty obligations in "com
pulsorily detaining" in America Ger
man subjects who. under the treaty of
), are entitled, even in the case of
an actual outbreak of war, to pursue
their avocations unmolested. Recall
ing the charges of violation of treaties
and the law of nations made against
Germany in the earlier days of the
war. the AmMger continues:
"The breach of diplomatic relations
with the United States will probably
he made again the occasion for level
ling against us charges of breaking
treaties and international law In order
to mobilise the Indignation of the
whole world against our shameful
acts. It Is therefore not at all an act
of supererogation to point out now,
while the deed Is still fresh, that the
United States, simultaneously with the
breach of relations, has been guilty of
an unjustified breach of treaty In con
fiscating German property contrary to
treaties between them and Germany
and condemning German subjects
(Continued on Page Three.)
will leave tomorrow morning at 8
o'clock over the Great Northern for
Helena, where they will he mustered
out of government service at Fort
Harrison. The troop's equipment Is
following the men by freight.
The men are travelling In a special
tourist sleeper and left Douglas Sun
day night. They came by way of El
Paso, Dal hart, Tex., Pueblo and Salt
Lake.*
Contrary to report emanating from
Helena, some B0 members of the troop
who remained In the south did not
Join the regular army, according to
First Sergeant "Bill" George, eon of W.
B George of Billings, who left poug
(Contlnued on Page Five.)
HOW GERMANY WANiVd [ . s. TO MARK
SHIPS TRAVERSA G SUBMARINE ZONE
S
CnCCKEQEb FLAG
RED &• WHITE
£>TC?IPES
U. 5 .FLAG
/
In the note to the United States, upoo the receipt-of which diplomatic relations with Germany were severed, the Ber
lin government, after outlining the new submarine war gone through which neutrals would send their ships at the risk
of being sunk, made one concession to the United States. She stated that her submarines would permit one American |
ship each week to pass to and from the British port of Fal mouth, provided such ship carried no contraband of war.
This ship, for the purposes of ready identification, was to be marked as shown in the picture above. The ship, the
annex to the note said, was to be marked with vertical stripes alternately red and white. Each vessel must show a
checkered flag, red and white, and the American national fl ag must be shown at the stern. Ships so marked would be
given undisturb ed passage._________•_____
TWELVE BIG LINERS ARE
ENROUTE, ALL CARRYING
PASSE NGERS AND CARGOES
Two American Ships and One Dutch Are Within Danger Zone.
Alf the Vessels Are Carrying Supplies to the Entente. Three
Big Vessel» Are Now Overdue? But Their Passage Has Been
Lengthened Because of Departure From the Usual Trans
Atlantic Travel Lanes.
New York, Feb, 8.—Nine passenger liners flying flags of the
entente alii %. two ships of the American line and one of Holland are
today on the high seas between New York and European ports. The
American and Dutch ships, bound east, are within possible danger of
submarines or mines. In addition, three British passenger ships from
New York are due to arrive but have not been reported. It is possible
word of their arrival has been withheld in accordance with recent
orders of British authorities. Nearly all have Americans on board.
The ships at sea, several of them the largest now in trans-Atlantic serv
ice and loaded with rich cargoes, are: -
'
York, from
American liners New
Liverpool, Feb. 3, and Kroonland, from
Liverpool, Jan. 31.
Ryndam (Dutch) from New York
for Rotterdam via Falmouth, Jan. 28,
and ordered back to this port yester
day when within 14 hour« of Fal
mouth.
White Star steamer Baltic for Liv
erpool. Feb. 2; Adriatic for Liverpool,
Feb. 8, and now 1,100 miles out; Cretlc
for' Naples, Feb. 6.
French line steamer Rochambeau,
Feb. 3, about »00 miles on her way.
Carmania (British) for Liverpool,
Feb. 4, about 1,900 miles from this port.
Daniel Allghtere (Italian) for Naples,
Jan. 24, now in the Mediterranean.
Saxonia 'British) for London via
Halifax. Jan. 13.
Italia (British) New York for Genoa.
Jan. 2».
ThemiBtocles (Greek) for Greek
ports, Jan. 28, now In Mediterranean
waters.
Ships that should have arrived but
have not reported so far are the Orduna
of the Cunard line, which sailed Jan.
21 for Liverpool; Pannonla (Brit
ish). for Liverpool via Halifax. Jan. 23,
and Taormina (Italian) for Naples,
Jan. 20.
On account of the submarines com
manding officers of British and allied
ships have taken unusual courses In
avoiding the usual sea lanes, thus
lengthening the voyage and making
uncertain their date of arrival. 'Ad
(Continued on Tage Eight.)
RESERVE SANK TIKES
PRECAUTIONARY STEPS
Will Protect Member Banks
From Runs by Foreign
Born Depositors.
Washington. Feb. 8.—The federal re
serve board has taken steps to safe
guard any member bank threatened by
a run by foreign-born depositors, and
will aid any bank In the country whose
stability Is thus threatened.
In the case of member banks, it
said, the board Is prepared to discount
virtually the bank's entire holdings of
paper Into currency.
Non-meirlber banks needing aid to
meet such a run. It is said, may receive
It indirectly from the board through
member banks.
BILL TO PERMIT
Under it Powell May Become
Deer Lodge and Deer Lodge
Daly County.
Special to the Post.
Helena, Feb. 8.—Under an act pro
posed in the stutv senate today coun
ties of Montana hereafter may change
their # names if occasion for amend
ment arises. Notice of the bill was
given by Senator Charles H. Williams
of Powell county and Senator J. B.
Gnose of Deer Lodge county. While
the bill Is Intended to relieve a pecu
liar situation in the two west side
counties represented ln the state sen
ate by Messrs. Williams and Gnose it
will apply to any county ln the state.
The bill will provide that steps may
be taken to legally change the name
of any county upon the Initiative of
15 per cent of the voters of the coun
ty as based on the vote for governor
ln that county at the last previous
election. If 15 per cent of the voters
sign a petition for a change of name
the matter is then brought up In the
district court In about the same way
that an Individual takes to legally
change his name. A decree of court
makes the change effective.
Senator Gnose su id today that there
(Continued on Page Eight.)
TO MIKE NO CHANGE
IN INAUGURAL PUNS
Washington, Feb. 8.—Formal an
nouncement w'as made today that ln
spite of the foreign situation the pub
lic Inauguration ceremonies. March 5,
will be held as planned. It was stated
that It will be made impressive **ln or
der to afford an opportunity for a per
fectly spontaneous exhibition of the
patriotic feeling of the country
________ __
IS.
IN THE BREAK
She Will Try to Secure Open
Lane for Her Ships in
North Sea.
BRITISH MINE FIELD AND
GERMAN SUB BLOCK WAY
j
j
Spain Also Demands Consider
ation Because She Sends
No Munitions.
Washington, Fob. 8.—The Nether
lands government, through the Amer
ican legation at The Hague, Has for
mally declined to accept President
Wilson's suggestion that it follow the
course of the United States and break
off diplomatic relations with Germany.
Information to this effect reached
here today in confidential dispatches
from Holland.
It also was said in the dispatches
that The Netherlands government has
made a protest against unrestricted
submarine warfare and that at the
same time negotiations had been
opened with Great Britain for the re
duction of its mine field. Tho Dutch
government plans to have the British
field and the German danger zone,
which now overlap each other, so
contracted as to make a clear path
through which its ships may pass.
Note From Spain.
Spain's note, which, it is under
stood, formally declines to accept
President Wilson's suggestion that she
break off diplomatic relations with
Germany, was received today at the
state department but was not made
public.
Spain, it is understood, protests
vigorously against the new subma
rine order as a violation of interna
tional law and invasion of neutral in
terests.
Having taken over American inter
ests In Germany and being the best
equipped diplomatically of the re
maining neutrals, Spain is anxious to
keep open communication with Ber
lin as the best channel for négocia
(Continued on Page Eight.)
LITTLE HOPE TO AVERT
1 BREAK WITH AUSTRIA
Washington, Feb. 8.—Austria has not
as yet withdrawn or modified her note
adhering to the German submarine
campaign, it was stated officially* to
day at the state department.
The possibility that a break with
Austria also can be avoided has prac
tically been given up. Despite some
differences in Austria's situation, her
etrict adhesion to the principles taken
by Germany both In a note to this
government and in other communica
tions makes her position practically
the same.
officials who have been hoping that
a break might be avoided will give
no intimation as to why a definite an
nouncement is not made.
______ ___
| hi»~wïfe
KILLED WHEN TUT
TURIND WAS LOST
Several Large Vessels Off the
British Isles Were Tor
pedoed Today.
PRESIDENT CALLS FOR ALL
REPORTS ON LATEST CASE
American Was One of Three
Firemen Who Lost
Their Lives.
London, Feb. 8.~An American negro
fireman on tho British steamer To
rino, George Washington, was killed
when that vessel was torpedoed to
day according to a report received
by the American embassy. One
of the survivors is Calvin B.y, an
American citzon of Fillmore, Utah.
Washington was one of three firemen
who were killed. According to the
nformstion received by the embassy
now in Liverpool. An ef
fort is being made by the embassy
to find her.
Turino was a vessel of 2.702 tons
net. She sailed from Norfolk Jan. 19
for Liverpool.
Others Lost Today.
Others reported sunk by Lloyd's to
day are:
The British steamer Boynecastle,
245 tons gross.
The Swedish steamship Varing,
2,296 tons gross.
The British steamer Holbinside.
2,682 tons gross.
The British steamer Dauntless, 2,157
tons gross.
The crew of the Holbinside left tha
vessel ln boats and the captain has
been landed. Bix members of tha
Dauntless crew were picked up after
T-J „„„
she had been torpedoed. Two mem
bers of the crew were killed and the
captain was seriously wounded.
PRESIDENT CALLS FOR
REPORT ON THE TURINO
Washington,
(Continued
Feb. 8. — President
Tage Eight.)
U-BOATS KEEP UP THE
AVERAGE TO DESTROY
MILLION TONS MONTH
Washington, Feb. 8.—The third
day of Germany's new submarine
campaign shows that the undersea
boats are maintaining the average
destruction sst by the Berlin naval
experts as necessary to success.
The third day's reported losses
totalled 27.985 tons and the preced
ing two days totalled 56,000. At
such a rate the destruction of
1,000,000 tons a month, which is the
German aim, would seem about to
be accomplished. German naval
experts contend that such an aver
age would cut England off from
the world and end the war by her
starvation.
It ie realized here, however, that
the British government is not lack
ing in measures to keep the sea
lanes open and that these will be*
come apparent at the campaign
progresses. It is pointed out that
while the world knows of the
losses of the merchant ships it
knows little, if anything at all.
about the losses of the submarine
flotillas.
LITTLE LIKELIHOOD OF
SPECIAL ELECTION NOW
Cost of Electing Successor to
_ - ..
Late Representative Flam- i
nan tfl Qorv/P Finht Havç
EL, ,]°r M V ;»nl ^
WOUlO tXCeeQ $lO v UuU a
- I
t . , .♦ u
In 'lew of the fact that It would
coat Stiver Bow county 813,000 or more
to elect a successor to the late Jerry
J. Flanigan in the state assembly to
serve a period not to exceed eight
legislative days, it Is highly improb
able that a special election will be held
on Feb. 19. A democrat has been ap
pointed by Governor Stewart to suc
ceed a democrat, so that the com
plexion of the house is unchanged and
taxpayers, officials and citizens of the
county generally believe that the mat
ter should rest there.
In event a special election was called
it could not be held for less than
$13,000. Even If the successful candi
date should qualify immediately he or
she would have but eight ^legislative
days to serve, since the election could
not he held before Feb. 19 and the as
j
LABOR BILLS MAKE
HEADWAY IN THE
MONTANA SENATE
Committee Brings in
Reports on Healy
Measure.
Two
UPPER HOUSE REVIVES
TRADINGJTTAMP BILL
Mine Taxation Reports Com
ing Up—Assembly Has
a Busy Day.
Special to the Post.
Helena. Feb. 8.—In both houses
the legislative mill ground out a
big grist of routine today. The
members of the senate indulged in
a one-sided debate over Healy's
bill, known as the "model" labor
act, and in the end gave it their
approval. This bill makes lawful
(certain agreements between em
ployers and employed and limits
the use of the injunction.
The senate committee on labor and
capital presented two reports on the
Healy bill. The minority report, signed
by Willett, Annin and Hogan, recom
mended the passage of the measure;
the majority of the committee recom
mended that It be killed. Senators
Hogan, Healy and Annin spoke in
favor of the bill. No one championed
the majority report, which was rejected
b ya vote of 14 to 21. Then the ma
jority report was adopted.
Eight-Hour Bills.
The same committee recommended
H. B. 4, an eight-hour bill for women,
[ and H. B. 28, making the eight-hour
apply to firemen, engineers anl
! . ...... . ...' , ?... .
. !he > nltor " of P ubllP building», an-J
: «trtet the u
the reports were adopted.
The Wheat trading stamp bill, tabled
yesterday, was revived in the senate
and placed on general orders. Thin
measure Ip Intended to prevent or re
of trading stamps and
premiums. Over the opposition of
Edwards. Annin and Hogan, the sen
ate this afternoon in committee of the
whole recommended for passage H. B
67, prohibiting trading atnmps. Annin
charged the bill, instead of benefiting
Montana merchants, would help tho
mail-order houses. He insisted gro
cers no longer can make a cut price
on sugar w hen purchased with other
goods. Ktlward* said It was an in
fringement of the liberties of the peo
ple in the interest of the merchants.
In committee of the whole the sen
ate advanced the bill to revise the
boundaries of Prairie county and S. B.
132, creating a state livestock com
mission out of the state boards of
stock and sheep commissioners.
To Abolish Voting Machine.
Senator Edwards gave notice of a
(Continued on Page Twelve.)
SHOTS ARE FIRED IN
THE HUNGARIAN DIET
Amsterdam. Feb. 8 (via London).—
A Reuter dispatch from Budapest says
during a speech by Count Theodore
Batthyanyt In the Hungarian diet
three revolver shots were fired from
the gallery. Nobody was hurt and
after some excitement a man was ar
rested, who made a confused state
ment and was apparently intoxicated.
^ d \ y ern ad £";" 1(
March 1. On a
per diem baste election of a successor
to Mr. Flanigan would cost the county
more than $1,500 a day for his services.
A. a rr.ee,ient for not holding an
flection, a similar case occurring some
years ago In Madison county is cited.
In the case In nuestlon. a member of
th(f hou8e died whUo the assembly wat
, n saMlon . A sreclal election was au
tjiorlzed by the governor, but the time
intervening l>efore adjournment was so
short' that the election was not held.
In that Instance, as in the present i
the holding of an election was viewed
as an unnecessary extravagance anJ
that the result would not be warranted
by the expense. •
Expenses of a special election would
include printing of ballets, poll books,
establishment of polling places, many
of the latter to be built, and payment
of judges and clerks.
The governor's proclamation calling
the election le In usual form, with of
fers of 9100 reward for violations of
election laws in a sum up to $5.000 at
tached. A copy has been received bf
the commissioners. «

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