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The Butte daily post. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1913-1961, February 09, 1917, Image 10

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053058/1917-02-09/ed-1/seq-10/

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Overstocked
In Many
Lines
And special price
reducements will be
made to reduce stock
and to make room
for goods delayed in
transit and purchas
ed last fall at the old
prices.
DRESSERS
A fine line of nearly new
dressers with mirrors
priced as low
$7.50
FOLDING COTS
With mattress upholstered
on cot. fancy ticking;
$5.00 values,
for ...
$3.50
Complete Lines of
Office Furniture and
Sewing Machines
—AT—
OECHSLI
(OXLEY)
West Broadway
SIX FLOORS
Fillad with New
Furniture, Ruga
and Rangea
TO DETERMINE SENTIMENT
IS TO UNIVERSAL SERIE
Governors Will Be Asked to
Canvass State Guards
for Opinions.
New York. Feb. 9.—Governorsr of
•very state will be urged by a com
mute of vétérans of the national
guard and naval militia of New York
to take a census of their national
guards to ascertain the sentiment
among them regarding universal mil
itary service. A permanent organiza
tion to oarty out this campaign was
fomed hare last night at a meeting
of militia officers, active and retired.
Resolutions were adopted calling
Upon all who had had military expe
klcene to unite in an effort to obtain
national legislation to enforce uni
versal military service under federal
Control. The meeting also urged the
passage of legislation to inaugurate a
•ystem of general military training.
•The present national guard system
•nd the calling out of part of the New
York militia to guard bridges and
©th* r public w'orks during the present
crisis were condemned by speakers on
the ground that military service was a
fluty to which all men of proper age
ghould be equally liable.
THE WISE FOOL
ho
' All things come to th
quoted the Sage
"That eo?" questioned the Pool,
let's bait our hooks and throw oi
Into the bath tub and wait f«»r
to come along "
GRANDMOTHER KNEW
There Was Nothing So Good for
Congestion and Colds
as Mustard
But the old-fashioned mustard-plaster
turned and blistered while it acted. You
can now get the relief and help that
mustard plasters gave, without the plat
ter and without tha blister. <
' Musterole doei it It is a clean,
white ointment, made with oil of
mustard. It is scientifically prepared,
■o that it works wonders, and yet
does not blister the tenderest skin.
1 Just massage Musterole in with the
finger tips gently. See how quickly
it brings relief—how speedily the
pain disappears.
Use Musterole for sore throat, bron
chitis. tonsilitis, croup, stiff neck,
asthma, neuralgia, headache, conges
tion, pleurisy, rheumatism, lumbago,
pains and aches of back or joints.
sprains, sore muscles, bruises, chil
blains. frosted feet, coi<'
sins, frosted feet, colds of the chest
,(it often prevent* pneumonia).
«I
THIS CMIH
TO COVER STHTt
Endowment Fund of College of
Montana Will Be
Increased.
lender the direction of A. H. Zink,
who has had wide and successful ex
perience in such movements, the trus
tees of the College of Montana at L»eer
Lodge, the oldest Institution of higher
education in the state, will Inaugurate
a campaign for a larger permanent
endowment fund. The object is to
J secure $160,000, which, with w'hat is
j already in the fund, will permit the
j school to have membership in the
j North Central Association of colleges
and to maintain a standard that other
j wise would be Impossible.
; The campaign will he opened in
March with a banquet at which the
I governor and other state officers and
prominent men in various walks of
life will be guests. It will cover the
state and will be prosecuted vigor
ously. Already the residents of Deer
Lodge have pledged their co-opera
tion and help is assured from other
cities.
Butte has a peculiar interest in the
j institution, as in this city are located
many of its former students and tearh
| ers. Prof. Clinton H Moore was the
first president of the college; Dr. E.
J. Qroeneveld. who is now president of
the board of trustees, was formerly a
member of the faculty. In the busi
ness and professional life of Butte and
other cities of the state are many of
the graduates of the college, which al
ways has enjoyed a reputation for
work of an especially high order.
Mr Zink only recently arrived from
loua, where he conducted a campaign
for Penn college at Oskaloosa He
raised $481,000 for that institution. He
has conducted similar campaigns at j
Dayton. O.. and in other places in the)
country, and all with sigratl sucess j
In comi-an; 1th Joseph Smith II. of
I>eer Ixvige and Dr. Harris Pillsbury.
preskiert of the college. Mr Zink
Lsited Butte yesterday. They met
i number of friends of the Deer Lodg
nstitution and left for home mu« !
encouraged with the prospects for
their proposed campaign.
'This money-raising movement
bound to be a winner.*' said Mr. Zink
to the Post. "It will include several
features new to this territory. One
of these will be the exhibition of 1,000
feet of films showing the work of the
college in every department and in
ery phase These will be shown, we
expect, in every Presbyterian church,
in every theater of the state and many
lodge rooms in connexion with films
provided by the Northern Pacific rail
road. The latter will show scenes
along that line of the road In this
state and will be highly educational
and interesting.
Among other features will be assist
ai!« e tendered by a corps of workers
in automobiles. These enthusiasts wllj
cover a territory perhaps included in
an area of 100 miles from Deer Lodge.
"The people of Deer Ixxige have en
tered enthusiastically into the cam
paign and already they are counting
it being the most successful In the
history of the Institution. Frank Con
lev hus donated quarters In the United
States National hank building, from
which the work of the campaign will
directed. He is an enthusiastic
supporter of the college and has al
s given It loyal support. We are
going to raise that $150.000."
Dr. Pillsbury. president of the col
lege. said that his institution never
had better prospects than It enjoyed at
present.
' This year's attendance increased 75
per cent over last year," he said. "I
have reason to believe that next year
will not have room enough for all
the students who will want admit
tance. Every room is occupied In the
girls' dormitory. The spirit of the
school was never better and, I believe,
its Influence in the state was never
as wide as at present We feel that
the campaign about to open marks *
new era for this pioneer institution of
learning In Montana "
ASK APPROPRIATION FOR
HORTICULTURAL BOARD
Resolutions endorsing the work of
the Montana state board of horticul
ture and requesting the legislative as
sembly to provide an adequate appro
priation for envying on tha work of
the board have been adopted by the
Missoula Chamber of Commerce and
copies forwarded to members of the
assembly.
After reviewing the efficient work of
the board In maintaining a rigid und
adequate fruit inspection and stamp
ing out plant diseases, the resolutions
say:
"Be It resolved by the Missoula
Chamber of Con.meroe, that this
sanitation go on record as supporting
the Montana state hoard of horticul
ture In Its valiant fight against dis
eases In fruit and farm products.
Be It further resolved, that we re
quest the legislature as a whole, and
the Missoula county representatives In
house and sénats, to work with all
possible ardor to secure an adequate
appropriation for the carrying on of
the work of the Montana Mate boaid
of horticulture.'"
WILSON WILL GO OUT TO
GET HIS INFORMATION
Washington. Fob. «-resident Wilson
plans to visit the capitol and executive
departments frequently from now
whenever he desires information quickly
or wonts to take any steps in connection
with legislation
It was said officially todav that no sur
prise or alarm need be felt if the presi
dent suddenly goe« to the capitol at any
hour of the day or visits any member of
his cabinet. So many pending questions
have to be taken up that the president
has found It too slow to call to tfce white
house all the men he desires to s<
Mr. Wilson Is now making few routine
engagements And is keeping practically
all h1s time open for work in connection
with the foreign situation.
I
is
j
j
GLASS OF SALTS
CLEANS KIDNEYS
If Your Back Hurts or Bladder
Bothers You, Drink Lots
of Water.
When your kidneys hurt and your
back feels sore, don't get scared and
proceed to load your stomach with a
lot of drugs that excite the kidneys
and irritate the entire urinary tract
Keep your kidneys clean like you keep
your bowels clean, by flushing them
with a mild, harmless salts which re
moves the body's urinous waste and
stimulates them to their normal ac
tivity. The function of the kidneys
is to filter the blood. In 24 hours
they strain from it 500 grains of acid
and waste, so we can readily under
stand the vital importance of keeping
the kidneys active.
Drink lots of water—you can't drink
too much; also get from any pharm
acist about four ounces of Jad Salts;
take a tablespoonful in a glass of
water before breakfast each morning
for a few days and your kidneys will
act fine. This famous salts is made
from the acid of grapes and lemon
Juice, combined with llthia, and has
been used for generations to clean
nd stimulate clogged kidneys; also to
neutralize the acids in urine so it no
longer is a source of Irritation, thus
ending bladder weakness.
Jad Salts is inexpensive; cannot in
jure; makes a delightful effervescent
llthia-water drink which everyone
should take now and then to keep their
kidneys clean and active. Try this,
also keep up the water drinking, and
no doubt you w ill wonder what became
of your kidney trouble and backache.
MAKING PEINS FOR THE
CREAT TALES MEETINC
Salt Lake, Butte and Denver
ly
of
May Send Special Trains
to Convention.
Discussion of the preparations for the
«liatrici convention at Great Falls March
2 and 3 occupied the main portion of the
weekly luncheon-meeting of the Butte
Rotary club at the Butte Grill yesterday.
Dr. John A. Donovan, acting governor
for the district in the absence of Dr. T.
C. Witherspoon, Is In charge of the ar
rangements for the meeting. It is under
stood that a special train may be engaged
to take the delegates from this city, In
cluding the delegates from Salt l^ake and
Anaconda. A rate of a fare and one
third lias been secured. The Salt Lake
delegation is expected to arrive here
Thursday morning. March 1.
It is also said that there may be a
special train from Denver via Billings to
Great Falls. Big preparations are being
made in Great Falls for the reception of
the visitors. This Is the first district
convention and several stutes will be rep
resented. It was suggested that the
Rotary club arrange for a dinner at the
Woman's club in the near future and
give the proceeds towards disposing of
the remaining debt on the building. Four
v members were taken into the organ
ization yesterday: Ralph Van Kirk, R.
Tuah, William Stearns. H. C. Frary.
of
he
Frank Walker returned to his old
stand today as proprietor of "The
Mint."—Adv.
NEW HAMPSHIRE MAN
FOR SHIPPING BOARD
Washington, Feb. 9. — Raymond B.
Stevens of New Hampshire was nomi
nated by Preshlent Wilson today as a
member of the shipping board to succeed
Bernard N. Baker, who resigned soon
after being confirmed by the senate.
SAYS WORDS FAIL
TO RELATE STORY
to
Well-Known Chicago Man Had
Suffered Torture for Years
With Stomach Trouble.
Nature, like an army when attacked,
has warnings and signals that should
never go unheeded. When the stom
ach, liver or kidneys suffer slight de
rangements they send out their hurry
call to be careful. Each has its warn
ing note, which frequently takes the
form of Indigestion, dyspepsia, gas on
the stomach, pains in the back or sides,
dizziness, sleeplessness, etc. Nine out
of ten people Ignore these first symp
toms and wait until serious illness has
laid them low before they seek relief.
Plant Juice, the new herbal stom
ach remedy, assists Nature, and will
bring relief in practically all cases of
a deranged stomach, liver or kidneys.
Thousands of local people are testify
ing to the benefits they have received
after they had practically given up all
hope of permanent relief.
Ona of the latest signed testimonials
Is that of Mr. Marion B. Early, t
lives at No. 3137 Cottage Grove ave
nue. Chicago, 111., and is employed by
one of the largest printing establish
ments In the city. Mr. Early is well
known in this city, having resided here
for tha past 40 years. He said:
•'After suffering Indescribable tor
tures from stomach trouble for years,
with awful pains In the pit of my
stomach and ho weis, I am glad to give
this public statement of what Plant
Juice has done for me. I got a bottle
at the Public Drug company, and to
my great surprise it gave ms Immedi
ate relief, and has put my stomach in
fine condition. It Is almost beyond
the power of pen to describe the relief
and Joy I feel, and to say that I am
deeply grateful for what this superb
remedy has done for me la expressing
It very mildly. I cannot recommend
Plant Juice too highly."
Plant Jules la aold in Butte at the
Newbro Drug Co. and in Anaconda at
I the Smith Drug Co.
HOSSII IMPRESSED
HT WILSON'SiGT
Government Satisfied America
Would Not Tolerate the
German Threat.
Petrograd, Feb. 8 (via London, Feb.
9).—The foreign office has given the
following statement to the associated
press In regard to the action of the
United States In terminating diplo
matic relations with Germany:
"The decision of the government of
the United States to sever relations
with a nation which has persisted In
the violation and perversion of all the
laws of warfare has produced a deep
impression in Russia. We feel
sured in advance that the United
States would not tolerate this last
threat of Germs ny. but we are none
the less appreciative of the prompt and
decisive manner in which President
Wilson has shown his disapproval of
Germany's mad submarine program
and his desire to continue on friendly
terms with a nation which ignores the
first principles of civilization and hu
manity.
Hostility of Neutrals.
"Whatever may be the further eon
sequences of the present diplomatic
rupture, Germany at least has been
shown that any continuance of her
past methods will meet the open hos
tility of the civilized world. It is im
possible for anv of the warring na
tions, however confident In the jus
tice of the cause for which they are
fighting, to remain insensible to the
approval or disapproval of a great
neutral power.
For this reason we cannot too deep
ly acknowledge our appreciation ot
President Wilson's verdict. Every
here where men are fighting for the
triumph of right and justice, the ac
tion of the United States will call
forth and consolidate their conviction
of a necessity of finishing forever with
German militarism and its atrocities."
BULGARIANS BELIEVE
WAR SOON WILL END
Berlin, Feb. 8 (via Ixrndon, Feb. 9).—
Premier Radoslavoff of Bulgaria in an
interview with the Sofia correspondent
of the Koelnls. he Zeitung is quoted as
saying that coming events would only
emphasize the success of the central
pow'ers and would probably decide tho
«•hole war within a reasonably short
time. The correspondent adds that
he learns that the Bulgarian govern
ment proposes to act toward the
United States "in accordance with its
obligations as an ally of the central
powers." He says that the people of
Sofia regard the American course with
regret
The Bulgarian press emphasizes the
.assertion that Field Marshal von Htn
denburg and his staff reckoned before
hand with Americas decision and
reached the conclusion that ruthless
submarine warfare would bring ad
vantages greater than the disadvant
ages of American hostility. Tho pa
pers generally express the opinion that
the prospects of an early peace are
now better than ever.
RIVERS AND HARBORS BILL
IS REPORTED TO SENATE
Washington, Feb. 9.—The rivers and
harbors bill carrying a total of $38,
500,000. about $137,000 more than
when it passed the house, was reported
today to the senate from the commerce
committee Senator Kenyon, repub
lican of Iowa, gave notice he would
fight the bill and propose a pubstitute
to appropriate a lump sum of $ 22 , 000 ,
000 for improvements where the war
department Bees fit
FIRST PICTURE OF AMERICA'S MOST
FAMOUS P PT $OVFD. TIM I A If A 1 VFARS
Her, Is th* first picture of Jesse Pomeroy. America's mn.t
Since be was placed In solitary confinement In th iSo^ t . pr ls°ner,
during certain boure Pomerey i^s he ° n lhe «
convicted of boy munUr ^ ^ure l^t ri> 0 ^ Pon,c° r n °' h ' n *", "■ "»•
years ago. * ""* l snow > Pomeroy as he looked 41
Theate
THE
STARTING SUNDAY—THREE DAYS ONLY
GREATEST OF ALL STA»
WILLIAM
/FARNUM
In
AEilliam Fox's Super De Luxe Photoplay Production
"THE PRICE OF SILENCE 1
Illustrating the Splendid Power For Good of a Woman s Love
NO ADVANCE IN PRICES
General Admission 15c
Children
TODAY AND TOMORROW—TWO DAYS ONLY
Bryant Washburn and Nell Craig in "The Break«.
Taken From the Story of Arthur Stringer in the Saturday Evening Po
MUTIWJEFF
Cartoon Comedy
GEORGE OVE 1
In "Jerry's
AMUSEMENTS
SIX CRINOLINE GIRLS
ENTERTAIN AT EMPRESS
The Six Crinoline Girls, the gor
geous headline act at the Empress this
week, are making a pronounced hit
here. This is only one of the big fea
tures on the bill which has been play
ing to capacity houses right along.
The Crinoline Girls are all premier
musicians and singers and their offer
ing Is Just the sort which can be en
joyed by old and young alike. Six all
star attractions make up this excellent
show and it has been exceptionally
well received by local theater-goers.
Edna Dreon, the singing comedienne,
is in a class by herself and her work
behind the footlights hus placed her
among the front ranks of high class
entertainers. This great show will run
Friday and Saturday, closing the latter
night. Don't miss it.
AEROPLANE LOSSES IN
MONTH OF JANUARY
Berlin, Feb. 9 (by wireless to Say
vllle).—The Germans lost 34 aero
planes In January and the British,
French and Russians 55, the war office
announced today
Big Saturday Evening Post Story at Orp
R,
■E3
cene from"TbC Breaker" ♦ Esjanay
Bryant Washburn and Nell Craig, starring in "The Breaker," taken fro
story of Arthur Stringer in the Saturday Evening Post, to be presented^
and tomorrow at the Orpheum theater;_
MURDERER OF CHILD
TRACED BY HOUNDS
Ord, Neb., Feb. 9.—Bloodhounds,
brought from Albion, wem last nlgtit
sat on the trail of a young man sus
pected of assaulting and murdering
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY AT THE
EMPRES
SEE
f The Six Crinoline Girls
L Six Daughter* of Dixie
AND FIVE MORE BIG FEATURES
Daily Mainees at 2:00 «/Clock
Night Shows at 7:15 and 9:15 o'clock
LIBERTY THEATER
The Home of Perfectly Projected Photopl »/ 1 __
TODAY—TOMORROW
The Piper's Priee|
A Bluebird Photoplay
Alice Parker, daughter of â
farmer. They traced him to
The young man is Louis
aged 21. He was arrested
about a year ago for criminal
upon the daughter of a Danish
He is now in custody
and I

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