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The Butte daily post. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1913-1961, April 11, 1917, Image 1

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WEATHER FORECAST
BUTTE—Tonight: Generally fair.
Tomorrow: Generally fair.
L. 5. NO. 87.
Œïje Putte Hatty $oöt
BUTTE MONTANA. WEDNESDAY. APRIL 11. 1917
WEATHER
FORECAST
MONTANA—Gene
rally fair tonight and
Thursday, warmer east portion tonight.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
R FINANCING MEASURE
OVIPING SEVEN BILLIONS
IS Rl. ''RIED TO HOUSE
s Are to Be Issu Sr Five Billion Dol
rs and Two Billions Are to Be Raised
by Short Term Treasury Notes.
er Bond Issues Already Provided for by
w Also Will Be Included in the Financial
ct. Congress Will Begin Discussion on the
easure Friday. Quick Action in the House.
shington, April 11.—The war financing bill, provid
er $5,000,000,000 in bonds and $2,000,000,000 in treas
ertificates, was reported for passage today in the
e by the ways and means committee. Chairman
in, introducing and reporting the bill to the house,
unced that it would be called up Friday for action.
' action by the house is expected. The bill authorizes
nd issue of $5,000,000,000 and provides that not to
d $3,000,000,000 from the proceeds of the bonds may
ed in extending credits to foreign governments.
remaining $2,000,000,000 to
t home. It also authorizes an
al bond issue not to exceed
,460 to redeem the 3 per cent
[ t 1908, maturing Aug. 1, 1918. It
•In provision for other bonds al
1 authorized by law and author
^, 000 , 000,000 worth of certificates
ebtedness to run one year.
For Liberal Credits.
j report on the bill states that the
''deems it advisable to au
'e the $5.000,000.000 bond issue at
Sne in order to enable our gov
ern to extend liberal credits and
er to provide immediately ample
[to meet such expenditures as are
Vized for the national security
Vfense."
test is not to exceed ZVz per cent
'e bill leaves the denominations
bonds to the discretion of the
ry of the treasury- If at any
]pr<;>r to Dec. 3i. 1918. a subse
series of bonds are issued at a
rate of Interest, bonds issued
authority of the act may be con
;le into bonds bearing the higher
Y APPROPRIATION
BILL PASSES SENATE
\shington, April 11.—The army ap
iation bill carrying $278,000,000
existing regular army was
d today by the senate, amended
at it becomes immediately avail
hill has passed the house but
)t changes made by the senate
conference necessary. Efforts
Jtarh to it amendments to increase
ay of private soldiers; to direct
resident to call for 500,000 volun
nd to abolish the rank of briga
[ general were eliminated before
~ge. One amendment enlarging
eneral staff of the army to 91 was
ted.
mediately after its passage the
to passed Without debate the mill
academy appropriation bill carry
bout $1,300,000.
UNTEËlTBÏLÏr IS
INTRODUCED IN SENATE
a shington. April 11.—A resolution
orizlng the president to call for
,000 volunteers was introduced to
by Senator Sherman, republican,
h«id upon the table at his request
out debate.
OD CONTROLLER ONE OF
WAR'S FIRST NECESSITIES
espread Suffering, it is
redicted, Will Follow Un
ss Steps Are Taken to Con
erve Supplies and Regulate
e Prices.
bil to the Post.
Washington, April 11.—That a food
• oiler is the first necessity of the
is the opinion growing in con
8 ' a nd that Herbert Hoover, lately
*!'.e Belgian Relief commission, is
man for the jqj) is the opinion at
white house.
10 food problem is as urgent as it
erlous. Widespread suffering fol
,l by food riots is almost in
Hl,Ie If steps are not taken at once
onserve the supplies and regulate
etary of Agriculture Houston
d attention to the shortage of
at and Irish potatoes as long ago
* ®rch 7. Since then all news as
olher crops has been bad. The Ut
as to wheat is the worst. W. B.
th ® crop expert, estimates the
er wheat yield «.t 71.1 per cent.
8 « worse than the worst crop
r recorded when in 190* the figure
« <6.5. This record has never since
n approximated.
'en so conservative a publication
CREW OF SHIP
THAI IS SUNK
Explosion Sends Liner Salmo
Dowr>— Nothing is Seen of
U-Boat or Torpedo.
London, April 11.—During the week
ending April 8 seventeen British mer
chant vessels of more than 1,600 tons
were sunk. Two vessels of less than
1,600 tons were sent down. This was
officially announced tonight.
of
Washington, April 11—Sinking
the Wilson liner Salmo, having aboard
one American, who was saved, was
reported to the state department to
day by Consul Frost at Queenstown.
His dispatch follows:
"Wilson liner Salmo, 1,095 tons,
Oporto to Liverpool, sunk by ex
plosion amidships in ten minutes at
12:30 p. m. April 7, 150 miles west of
Blaskets. Norwegian fireman lost;
chief engineer perhaps fatally scalded.
No submarine or torpedo seen. Weath
er squally, heavy swells, low tempera
ture. Captain's boat rescued by
tanker Konakry, Port Arthur to
Queenstown, 5 p. m. the 8th. After 28
hours in heavy weather landed at
Queenstown. Other boat believed to
be landed at Valentia. Sole Ameri
can on board Michael Piorun, Phila
delphia, fireman, saved, now at
Queenstown. Have affidavit of
Piorun, also blaster."
CREW OF AMERICAN
STEAMER IS SAFE
Washington, April 11.—Details of the
sinking of the American unarmed
steamer Seward and exposure of her
crew of 31 men, including 24 Amer
icans, in open boats, 25. miles from
land in the Mediterranean, was re
ceived at the state department today
from Consul Hurst at Barcelona,
Spain. His dispatch, dated April 10,
says:
"Unarmed steamer Seward of New
(Continued on Page Eleven.)
HOOVER ACCEPTS
CHAIRMANSHIP OF
U.S. FOOD BOARD
London, April 11.—Herbert C.
Hoover, head of tha American com
mission for relief in Belgium, after
consulting with his colleagues on
the commission, has accepted the
chairmanship offered him by the
national defense council of the food
board in the United States. Mr.
Hoover expects to leave shortly for
Amorica. Meanwhils ha has initi
atod a wido inquiry in Franca,
England and Italy ragardlng tha
axisting food aituation. Tha In
quiry includas examination of tha
prospects of tha coming harvast,
import nacaaaitiao, mathods of food
ragulation and eantral now in opor
ation in tha alliod eountrias and
tha rosults achiovod.
ai tha National City Bank'« monthly
bulletin uses the following alarming
language:
"The closing months of the crop
year find this country with a smaller
etock of all kinds of food than at any
time in many years, and when the
(Continued on Page Sixteen.)
THE CARRIAGE AWAITS
[OopTTitU HIT: ptlti
FEAR EDDYSTONE DIS
WAS NOT DUE TO AC(jl
DEATH LIST REACH
ASTER
DENT;
ES 122
Police Authorities Investigating the Explosion Say That it it
Was the Work of Plotters the Persons Wt, caused it Died
With the Victims. Two Suspects, Arrested Last Night, Have
Been Released. Bodies of Some of the Girl Victims Were
Blown Into the Delaware River.
Chester, Pa., April II.—With 122 dead and between 125 and 150
injured, the majority girls and young women, the authorities today
turned their efforts toward placing the blame for the explosion yes
terday at the plant of the Eddystone munition corporation. In a signed
statement Samuel M. Vauclain, head of the munition company, said:
"We are unable to account for the explosion in any way other than
the act of some maliciously inclined person or persons."
offi
Although police and company offi
clals worked through the night at
tempting to establish identities of the
dead, they were hampered by the con
dition of the bodies. Some of the vic
tims, company officials believe, were
blown into the Delaware river, so that
an exact calculation of the death list
may never be possible.
President Alba B. Johnson of tho
Baldwin Locomotive works changed
his theory that the explosion was duo
to an accident after a visit to the
plant. He now agrees with Samuel
M. Vauclain, president of the Eddy
stone Ammunition corporation, that
plotters caused the explosion.
Release Suspects.
"Although we have only circumstan
tial evidence," Mr. Johnson said, "it
looks as If some one touched off a
bomb or a time clock with an ex
plosive attached. I am convinced,
after a talk with the Eddystone offi
cials, that the catastrophe could not
have occurred through an accident.**
The Chester police have released two
suspects, father and son, named Cohen,
arrested last night. The Chester po
lice say that if the explosion was the
work of plotters, whoever caused it
must have died with the rest.
Late today an official of the com
pany said that the explosion was the
result of "a diabolical plot conceived in
the degenerate mind of a demon in
human guise."
This official said that the investiga
tion concluded this afternoon had
shown that a bomb manufactured from
a shell in the plant by one of the em
ployes had caused the disaster.
WRECK BUILDING WHEN
THEY BLOW S1FE OPEN
» -
Safe Door Hurled Out Upon
Tracks, Where it Wrecks
a Street Car.
Portland, Or,.. April 11. —Buralar.
u»ed so much explosive hers early to
day In Mowing open a safe In the sub
urban Jewelry store of J. Wolfe thaj
the store was wrecked and tha safe
door blown onto the car tracka In the
street In front, where It came near
wrecking an owl oar whose motorman
did not see It In the darkness until a
few feet away. Wolfs claims the bur
glars made away with jewelry valued
at $2,000. Police say they escaped In
an automobil
IE
HEAVY SLOWS ON
THE ARRAS FRONT
More Villages Taken—Troops
Encouraged by The!'
Successes.
British Headquarters in France,
April 11 (via London).—(From a staff
correspondent of the associated press.)
The speed and power of the British
assault, in what will probably be
known In history as the battle of Arras,
seem to have surprised the Germans
So much so In fact that their usual
retaliatory artillery fire has been
negligible in the last two days. This is
partly due, of course, to the number of
guns captured, to which must be added
the number knocked out by the British
artillery before the actual assault be
gan. It is also due to the fact that the
Germans have been too busy trying to
get their remaining guns away from
immediate danger to bother firing
them at the enemy. In a German ar
tillery position east of Arras, known as
Battery valley, could be seen the re
mains of 24 field pieces today.
Trenches Battered.
A tflp over the newly taken lines
(Continued on Tage Eight.)
SPECULATION IN
BUTTER AND EGGS
NOW ABOLISHED
Chicego, April 11. — Speculation
in butter and egg* through the Chi
cago butter and egg board wee
aboliehed "ae a patriotic duty" by
unanimoua vote of the direotora to
day. Thia wee accompliahed by
abolishing ell rule, covering deals
in these products far future deliv
ery. Dealers desiring to assure
stoeka for future delivery may deal
direct with shippers ae individuals
bat the action of the beard «rill, it
it said, practically aliminata ejacu
lation.
AMERICAN FLAG
IS CARRIED IN..
FRENCH BATTLE
A Texan Fighting With Cana
dian Troops Fixes it to
His Bayonet.
Ottawa. April 11.—The Stars and
Stripes went into battle for the first
time during the world war during the
recent entente storming of Vimy ridge,
in France, according to an unofficial
dispatch received here today from the
Canadian army headquarters in Eu
rope.
"To a young Texan who came to
Ontario to enlist and who is now lying
wounded in the hospital," the dispatch
reads, "belongs the honor of first car
rying the American flag into battle in
the European war, to which the
United States as a belligerent has just
entered. He went to the assault at
Thelus carrying the Stars and Stripes
on his bayonet and fell carrying the
flag."
The dispatch says the victory of
the Canadians in the struggle for
Vimy ridge is more thorough than
indicated by first reports. The only
obscurity as late as Tuesday morning
surrounded the position of Hill 145.
"For the retention of this," the mes
sage says, "the enemy fought with
the utmost determination Monday
afternoon. Thô hill is an earthen
fortress of the first importance with
many underground galleries and con
crete machine gun emplacements. This
hill is Isolated on three sides from the
German lines. The surrender is not
in doubt.
"Much war material was left behind
by the fleeing foe. Including an as yet
unestimated number of heavy guns.
The yield of prisoners is much larger
than the first reports indicated. Al
ready 3,280 men, including 60 officers,
have been recorded and many more
are to come. The final total may
reach 4,000 prisoners to the Canadian
troops alone."
Advices to the militia department
indicated the Canadian casualties
around Vimy were 89 officers. At
the usual percentage this would mean
about 1.200 men. The figures are
considered light in view of the number
engaged.
LAR6E ESTÂTES TO BE
TURNED INTO FIRMS
Trenton, N. J., April 11—Governor
Edge announced today that New Jersey
was prepared to accept a loan of large
estates which would be placed under
cultivation to increase the nation's
food supply.
"Recruiting is Imperative," the gov
ernor said, "but so is enlarged produc
tion of farm staples. The man who
actually aids the state in increasing
the agricultural output this year Is
performing the same high type of pa
triotic service as the soldier in the
trenches."
It is the governor's purpose to turn
Into food producing areas many of the
estates which have been proffered for
military purposes.
PRESIDENT WILL
INSIST UPON THE
WAR OFFICE PLAN
He is Informed in Conference
There is Opposition to i
Conscription. j
MANY WANT A TFIAL FOR
THE VOLUNTEERS FIRST
Executive is Informed Finance
Measure Will Pass With
out Difficulty.
Washington, April 11.—President
Wilson went to 'the house today for
conferences with Speaker Clark and
other leaders on the war program.
Democratic Leader Kitchin, who will
pilot the war revenue measures
through the house, was summoned and
the president, the speaker and Mr.
Kitchin entered into a conference.
Representative Kitchin assured the
president tho bond bill would be
passed Friday without difficulty.
The war department's plan for rais
ing an army by selective conscription
was the principal subject discussed at
the conference.
Opposition in House.
Both Mr. Kitchin and Speaker Clark
told the president of the opposition in
the house to conscription, but said
they did not know how strong it was.
The president earnestly urged that
the entire war department plan be
accepted by congress, but was told
that sentiment undoubtedly existed
for resorting to conscription only if
the volunteer system failed.
Only as an Emergency.
Representative Kitchin said he bad
not thoroughly examined the war de
partment plan and was not ready to
commit himself on it. Some of his
ds said that
be wi
is for conscrip
only ns an
emorg
?ency measure.
e president
went
over details of
•al other wj
ir moi
isures with the
leaders, prie
narily
to urge prompt
n and learn
the p
►revailing senti
'mont of the house membership.
Indications were that be would con
tinue to insist upon the war depart
ment plan as drawn though sentiment
uppeared to be developing for putting
u provision into the measure under
which an effort would be made first
to raise the army by volunteers.
TO BUG REGULARS UP TO
THE FULL WAR STRENGTH
Secretary Baker Says They
Will Number 287,000 Aside
From New Army.
Washington, April 11. — Secretary.
Baker, concluding his testimony before
the house military committee today,
said that he had decided, after consul
tation with army officers, to take ad
vantage of the authority to increase
the regular army by all the incre
ments authorized.
Under the present plan the war de
partment will immediately increase
the regular army to its full comple
ment of 287,000 men instead of 203,000
as was contemplated. This increase is
wholly apart from the new army to be
authorized by selective conscription.
HAD ORDERS TO WRECK
AAACRINERV OF HIS SHIP
Norfolk, Ya., April 11. — Captain
Kehrer, of the Austrian steamer Bud
apest, seized by the United States au
thorities at Newport News Monday,
admitted today to government officials
that he wrecked engines and machin
ery of his vessel on instructions from
a source he refused to disclose. He
received his orders Jan. 31 and car
ried them out immediately.
Captain Kehrer, his crew and tho
men from the German steamer Ar
cadia are being held by immigration
officers who are examining the men.
VERDICT OF NOT GUILTY IN
THE DOWLING MURDER CASE
Man Charged With the Killing
of Stanley Sims. Upon Hear
ing the Result, Jumps to His
Feet and Then Falls in State
of Collapse, Crying Like a
Child.
After deliberating from 6 o'clock last
evening to 10:30 o'clock this morning,
the jury in the case of John Dowling,
charged with the murder of Stanley
Sims on the night of Nov. 17 last, came
into court and announced & verdict of
not guilty. When the verdict was
read by Clerk F. B. Leahy of Judge
Dwyer's department of the district
court, Dowling was sitting alongside
of his attorney, Fwrtik G. Walker.
He jumped up. shook hands with Mr.
Walker and then w'ent Into a state of
collapse. Dowling was about to fall
GERMANY EXPELLED
FROM CONTINENTS
OF ENTIRE WORLD
Brazil's Minister at Berlin to
Demand His Passports
Tomorrow.
U. S. LEARNS THAT RIO
HAS DECIDED ON BREAK
Argentine, Peru and Guate
mala All Expected to
Join Uncle Sam.
London, April 11.—The Brazilian
minister to Germany will demand
his passports tomorrow and leave
Germany by way of Switzerland,
France and Spain, according to a
dispatch from Cologne forwarded
by the Exchange Telegraph cor
respondent at Amsterdam.
BIG REPUBLICS WILL
FOLLOW U. S. EXAMPLE
Washington, April 11. — Unofficial
advices announcing that Brazil had
decided to break off diplomatic rela
tions with Germany and that Argen
tine would support the United States
were received here early today.
The action of Brazil clears up mu<-h
of the doubt here as to the attitude of
Latin-American countries in the war.
Definite advices have been received
that Chile and Mexico would remain
neutral and indications increased that
Guatemala and Peru would Join Cuba
and Panama on the side of the United
States.
The action of Brazil and Argentina
is expected to have a tremendous in
fluence on other South American re
publics.
GERMANY EXPELLED
FROM ALL CONTINENTS
Geneva. April 11 (via Paris).—Tho
Journal do Geneve, commenting upon
the report that several of the South
American republics will follow the
lead of the United States in breaking
with Germany, says:
I "The essential factor is in the pro
i gresslve expulsion of Germany from
j all continents today. Even if the
British fleet did not exist the Germans
would not have a port of call outside
Europe, except In Slam. For an over
populated and overproductive country
which lives by exportations and which
j would die if *orced to fall back on it
! «elf, the loss of South America, com
ing after that of China, is a genuine
I catastrophe.
"It has often been said, 'in war vic
tory alone counts,' but it is no longer
true. The future counts more. Ger
many Is victorious in Europe, but
shut out of the rest of the world."
URUGUAY ISSUES A
NEUTRALITY DECREE
Montevideo, April 11.—The govern
ment today issued a decree of neutral
ity in the war between the United
Page Eleven.)
VISIT UNITED STATES
A. J. Balfour Comes as Head
of British International
Experts.
Washington, April 11. — Secretary
Lansing this afternoon confirmed a
report that Arthur J. Balfour, British
foreign minister, will arrive in this
country shortly at the head of a com
mission of British international ex
perts. No details of the personnel or
date of departure were given out.
to the floor when his attorney put
his arms about him and dragged him
to a chair near by. There Dowling
sat for about five minutes in a half
conscious condition and cried like a
child. As soon as he recovered he
left the courthouse, accompanied by
some friends.
The trial of Dowling was com
menced Monday, with Attorney Frank
C. Walker representing the defendant
and County Attorney Joseph R. Jack
son. Chief Deputy N. A. Rotering and
Deputy Frank U. Riley representing
the state. A Jury was secured dur
ing the morning and the taking of
testimony was commenced in the
afternoon. Stanley Sims and his wife
lived in East Butte, where they kept
a few boarders, among whom wai
John Dowling. There was a suspicion
in Sims' mind that Dowling was too
friendly with Mrs. SLms. On the evo
(Continued on Page Sixteen.)

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