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The Butte daily post. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1913-1961, April 14, 1917, Image 11

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THE BUTTE DAILY POST
ANACONDA
bureau
KNIGHTS WILL
COfUIE TO ftNIGONDN
f C. Will Initiate a
Class Tomorrow in
A. 0. H. Hall.
Big
<>nda, April 14.—Many Knights
unibus from Butte and other
f the state will be on hand to
to participate in the initiation
nies by the local council. At
all will assemble at the K. C.
and at 10:45 will march to
ill's church, where solemn high
•ill be celebrated at 11 o'clock.
R. Coopman will be the celc
~nd the sermon will In* delivered
her Hoff of Mount St. Charles
Helena. In the afternoon the
rs and candidates will meet in
O. H. hall. At 1 o'clock the
tes will receive the first degree,
ond degree at 2 o'clock and the
't 5 o'clock. In the evening at
k a banquet will he given in
C. club house.
g to high cost of necessities,
ers raise rates, effective May 1,
t hours shall constitute a day's
for teamsters at $4 per day.
overtime worked shall be at 50
per hour.
T erymen for wholesale and re
ores' shall work nine hours per
t $4 and all overtime shall be at
n hour.
hours shall constitute a
York for stablemen at the rate
day and 50 cents an hour for
men taking care of two head of
or more or one automobile or
shall receive at least one-half
the rate of $4 per day.
mi' and six horse drivers shall
$4.50 and $5 respectively for
hours, and all overtime at the
CO cents and 70 cents per hour
Jtively. Committee,
JOHN HENDERSON,
RERT HOGG.
JOHN SFLL1VAN.—Adv.
T BE ABLE TO
KE PARIS AND BACK
NE DAY WITH AIRSHIP
Dnda. April 14.—If the invention
k <i. Benson turns' out to be a
• one can leave Anacbhda in the
g, transact business and visit
in Paris and Lnndpp and return
ii lime for supper. Mr, Benson,
from Vancouver, B. C., and
be winter in Anaconda, has a
l»c of airship which is expected
a speed of 1.000 miles mi hour,
»son has gone to Washington in
•rest of his invention.
L0YES TO FLOAT
ATI0NAI. FLAG OVER
THE B. A. & P. SHOPS
ton rin. April 14.—A huge Ameri
g lias been ordered from Chicago
nnas I). Kelly, who is treasurer
fund which was started by the
es of the B. A. & P. yesterday,
pnl fir tree has been erected on
of the shops and a special
>in« ceremony will be held as
Nit* flag arrives from the east.
D PLAYS WITH
IGHTED CLOTH AND
SUFFERS BAD BURNS
in.da, April 14.—While Annie
four-year-old daughter of Mr.
rs. Severni Ceconi of 1117 East
licit, was playing with a lighted
esterday her clothes caught fire
e suffered severe burns. Dr. M.
man is hopeful that the burns
lot prove fatal.
E CHANCFfo -
LEAVE ANACONDA
jjînnda, April 14.—Jack Kelly, white,
• It l«akc Slim." colored, were nr
last night by Night Chief Walsh
fTii-er O'Keefe charged with being
ous and undesirable characters,
»ere given a chance this morning
town and availed of the oppor
ABY UP WALL DEAD.
onda. April 14.—Benedict Daniel,
'ear-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Chas.
. died this morning at the family
ec. 511 Cherry street. The funeral
B held tomorrow afternoon at 2
SIT THE SMELTERS.
°n«la, April 14.—Among the Butte
to the smelters today were Dr.
Reinhardt and son, Irving Rein
Prof. w. H. Clark, Prof. B. E.
1 and George Phillips.
P. MAHONEY
funeral director
Main Street, Anaconda.
FIOE NEVER CLOSED
Bell Phone It
A. & P. RY.
Time Table
Anaconda '.<«• U« l:M Ml
• Bau. UJI fM «4»
1 • ■ «
B un« ... • IM CM II:*»
"•ron*. .,0:U CM 0:00 MM
MANY IE OPPOSED
TO
Question Raised by Congress
man Evans the Cause of
Much Discussion.
Anaconda, April 14.—The question
of conscription for the army raised by
Congressman John M. Evans' telegram
to Montana constituents has caused
all sorts of discussion in and around
Anaconda. The telegram came di
rected to the Anaconda Chamber of
Commerce. There being no organiza
tion of that name it was delivered to
the secretary of the Anaconda Busi
ness Men's association, which has in
the past few years taken over and
cured for matters of this sort, as well
as ail others in which organized ef
fort was called for in this city.
Those telegrams were published in
the Post of yesterday and are self ex
planatory. Exceptions to the reply
have been taken and another message
was sent to Congressman Evans last
evening as follows:
"Reply of the Anaconda Chamber
of Commerce to your telegram in no
wise represents the sentiments of the
community. Anaconda stands loyally
behind the president in his request for
authority to raise an army by con
scription.
"It is not a question of a lack of
volunteers, but of raising an army in
the manner which will be the best for
the lasting good of the nation. In
asking for conscription, we feel that
the president has been advised by the
best authorities in the country.
"We urgently request you to back
up the president by voting in favor of
conscription."
The message of the business men,
sent the night before, was as follows:
"A consensus of opinion gathered
tonight from citizens of Anaconda is
that Montana will rally to the colors
with men and resources, and that con
scription Is not necessary at this time.
Anaconda and Montana are strictly
loyal and will support any measures
adopted by our president and repre
sentatives in congress to the limit of
powers."
It is evident that Anaconiia men of
all classes are of one mind as to loy
alty to the administration, and that
their differences are largely as to
means rather than as to thé aim.
A few of tho prominent citizens who
boulii'bé veafchOd ihday expressed their
opinions on the, sjjljject as follows:
L-. V'. Uqpfdqr—"1 do not think con
scription is necessary at this time.
Montana vyill rally to the colors if it
is necessary. rt
J. M. Minor—"Volunteers first, if we
qecd morÇ; soldiers get them."
W. am fur con
scription."
L. G. Smith—"I do not believe 'In
conscription at this time. I do not
think it necessary.'*
John W. James—"! think that con
scription is useless. The Anver lean
people are too patriotic and too loyal
to need conscription. So far as Deer
Ixidge county is concerned the re
sponse will be in excess-of the pro
rata called for.
George P. Wellcome—"I am in favor
of conscription if an army cannot be
raised any other way first, hut let us
try the other way."
J. P. Stagg—"Lot those who want
to go, go first. If that is not sufficient
then conscription."
J. Ii. Gnose— "If that demonstration
last Monday night meant anything at
all, if there was any patriotism or
loyalty in that immense throng, con
scription is not needed in Anaconda."
Chauncey L. Beal—"No, conscription
at this time would he a slam at the
patriotism of the American people.
Give our boys a chance. They have
not had time to make ready for the
response they are ready to make to
President Wilson."
Tom McGrath—"No, we do not need
any such measures in Montana yet."
Mayor Ed O'Brien—"1 do not think
conscription is necessary in Ana
conda. This city will furnish its full
quota of men for the service."
Albert Kletn—"My boy has volun
teered. If other boys do not do like
wise, I favor conscription."
G. W. Sparrow—"I do not think that
American boys will have to he forced
into the service of Uncle Sam.'*
T. J. Kelley—"Yes, I cannot see how
else the army is to be raised."
Frank Muller—"Under present con
ditions, conscription is not needed."
E. E. Hauser—"For invasion there
will be plenty of men but we are go
ing across the water. Conscription
may be necessary."
J. H. Murphy—"No. Conscription is
not necessary."
Brush Beckwith—"The enthusiasm
and patriotism shown here indicate
that locally conscription Is not neces
sary at this time."
C. R. Fuller—"If Uncle Sam needs
men there will be plenty forthcoming."
R. M. Grelg—"Let everyone take his
own shift. I favor conscription."
Fred Gangner—"Not at all necessary
here, but give the president full
power."
C. R. Rae— "I believe we will find
that, when called upon, there will be
plenty of young men In this country
willing and ready to go."
Judge Pringle—"After three years
of war Great Britain has not resorted
to conscription. Why should we?"
ROADS OPEN NOW
TO THE TEN MILE
Anaconda, April 14.— Th« road to the
Ten-Mile ie now ready for traffic for the
flrat time alnce the heavy snow* at the
beginning of the winter.
The Frankline— Circles and Read
ings. Phone 286-W. 114 Eaet Park,
Anaconda. Leaving Monday.
TWO ANACONDA MEN
DIEB THIS MORNING
Patrick Smith, an Old-Time
Blacksmith, Leaves Many
Friends to Mourn.
Anaconda, April 14.—Patrick Smith,
an old-time resident of Anaconda, 44
years old. died this morning. For years
Mr. Smith worked here as a black
smith. He was kicked by a horse and
lost a leg. Since the accident he had
worked as a cobbler.
Bernard A. MeOuinlan also died to
d'*y. He was but 27 years old. A
brother In Lawrence, Mass., and mother
in Ireland, survive. The body may be
shipped to Massachusetts for burial.
ROCH ON LEAVES' C I TY
FRIENDS_H0N0R HIM
Anaconda, April 14.— C. G. Rochon,
popularly known as "Jim" and employed
in charge of traffic on the hill for the
past 12 years, has resigned and will leave
for Alberta, Canada, to go ranching. He
was presented today by his friends with
an expensive diamond-set watch charm,
engraved with the emblems of his frater
nal associations. Mrs. Rochon was Miss
Edna Waterbury. Both will be missed
ami the best wishes of hundreds follow
m for success and happiness.
CRANKING FORD, SHE
GETS A BROKEN ARM
Anaconda, April 14.— While cranking her
Ford machine this morning Miss Edith Smith,
daughter of Peter Smith, received a broken
arm. The engine back fired.
ANACONDA CHURCHES.
Anucondu, April 14.— Swedish Bap
tist White temple, corner Fifth and
Cedar streets—Sunday school at 10:80
a. in., with classes for all. Preaching at
11:30 a. m. by the Hev. A. Johnson
Stormans. Evening services at 7:30
o'clock. Tuesday at 7:30 p. m. the
Ladies' Aid society will meet in the
•hureh. Mrs. Kd Scline will entertain
nid Mrs. A. J. Stormans will have
barge of the program. You are cor
dially welcome.
Don't forget the big dance tonight
at Austrian hall.—Adv.
ANACONDA BRIEFS.
Mr
J. Krum «and daughter,
Genevieve, have gone to visit rel
atives in Zumbrota. Minn.
Mr. and Mrs. II. H. Durston left
today for New York.
Mrs. William Coburn, who has been
visiting relatives in the city, returned
home today to Auburn, Wash.
Eyes examined $1, at L. F. Verberok
moes, city's leading optii ian since
Mrs. A. G. Davidson has gone to
Salt Lake to visit.
July, 1897 — Adv. v "
Dr. Crafft, osteopath. Phone 629 bTk.
FINANCE COMMITTEE
GOING AFTER FUNDS
Woman's Patriotic Committee
Must Have Supplies to
Keep Up Work.
With its organization complet^, hwdlfdi
of members enrolled and daily a greater de
rnand for supplie? felt, the finance committee
of the Woman'« Patriotic association of Butte
hu« issued a general m i'eal for financial aid
and the members of the committee will ap
preciate all contributions.
The members of the committee arc : Mrs.
J. K. Heslet, chairman . Mr«. John J. McHat
ton, Mrs. John Scovil, Mrs. T. J. Murray,
Mrs. C. B. Rhodes. Mrs. A. T. Morgan, Mrs.
J. C; Pvle and Mrs. T. J. Grin,
The committee members will begin an ex
haustive canvass of Butte for funds, as these
members are responsible in a large measure
for the success of the organization in keep
ing up the supplies and affording every mem
ber an opportunity to put in as much time
ns possible on the work.
The money will Ik? devoted entirely to the
purpose of furnishing bandage« and other
hospital dressings. The first shipment of
bandages was sent from Butte today, within a
week sin<*e the work was started. Another
box will be shipped to New York for trans
shipment to Europe next week and it will in
clude a number of the much sought after
knitted rrticles which are highly prized by the
soldiers.
Among the knitted goods the second box
will contain are several svs eaters, socks,
mufflers and caps.
I
FRIENDS PAY TRIBUTE
TO MEMORY OF BERSEY
A tribute to Jabez Bersey, who was
found dead a few days ago under the
J I. trestle, was paid by a few of
his friends who gathered at the funeral
services held this afternoon at Sher
man & Reed's undertaking parlors.
Rev. George D. Wolfe officiated. Burial
was made in the Mount Moriah ceme
tery.
Mr. Bersey had no relatives in Butte
and his funeral was held at the ex
pense of a few intimate friends and
church members, who have known him
several years. A beautiful floral
tribute w*as sent by these friends. Mr.
Bersey was a native of Cornwall, Eng
land, but he had spent many years of
his life In the United States.
STOCK EXCHANGE FIRM
SUSPENDS BUSINESS
New York, April 14.—The failure of
the stock exchange firm of Morris &
Pope was announced today. The firm
consists of Lewis G. Morris, exchange
member; J. Hathaway Pope and Frank
B. Porter. The failure is not regarded
as Important.
CHAMPIONS RETAIN
COURT TENNIS TITLE
Boston, April 14.—Jay Gould and W.
H. H. Huhn of New York, national
court tennis doubles champions, re
tained their title today by defeating
Joshua Crane and D. P. Rhodes in the
final match of the championship, the
score being (-1, 8-2, 6-S. The title
holdere showed splendid team work
and easily disposed of their opponents.
Edward Foley, aged 48 years and for
merly a policeman of Butte, died last
evening from heart failure. He ia sur
vived by his wife, a daughter, a son.
Frank, and two brothers, Peter of
Butte and Richard of Victor.
COLONEL ROOSEVELT'S
SO N GO ES TO CANADA
Quentin Joins the Dominion
Aviation Corps to Get
Instruction.
Montreal, April 14.—Quentin Loose -
\elt, son of Col. Theodore Roosevelt,
has Joined the Canadian aviation corps
to obtain instruction for service with
an American army at the European
front should an expedition go abroad,
it was announced by Colonel Mulloy,
one of the organizers of the Tour of
War Convention. if no American
troops go to France young Roosevelt
will serve with the Canadian air forces,
Colonel Mulloy stated.
ANOTHER SON WEDS
BEFORE JOINING COLORS
Boston, Aiirll 14. Archibald B.
Roosevelt, son of Col. and Mrs. Theo
dore Roosevelt, and Miss Grace S.
1 ,ockwood, daughter of Mr. and Mr«.
Thomas S. Lockwood of this city, were
married at noon today in Emmanuel
Episcopal church.
The date of the wedding was set
forward because of the expectation of
an early call to the colors by Mr.
Roosevelt, who is a member ut tire of
ficers reserve corps at Harvard uni
versity.
PRETTY CNURGR WEDDING
BY REV. FATHER BARRY
A beautiful wedding ceremony took
place Thursday morning at Immacu
late Conception church when Miss
Birdie Christopher, a native of County
Waterford, Ireland, and Daniel Parker
Wells were united in the holy bonds
of matrimony by Rev. Father Barry,
the pastor, at nuptial high mass at S
o'clock. Miss Nellie Connolly, a very
dear friend of the bride, was brides
maid, and Thomas Christopher, brother
of the bride, was best man.
Following the wedding ceremony a
delightful breakfast was served at the
home of Maurice Kane, uncle of the
bride. The tables were decorated with
spring flowers. The following were
present in addition to the four princi
pals and the officiating priest: Mr.
and Mrs. McFadden, Maurice Kane and
Mrs. Frank Wells.
The bride, who was charming in a
wedding gown with white silk hat,
carried a beautiful bridal bouquet of
roses. Her attendant, Miss Connolly,
wore navy blue and a white hat and
carried a bouquet of pink carnations.
There were a number of friends at the
wedding and follow ing the church cere
mony they gathered to exten
the best wishes to the young peopl
who are well knovwi here and ar
.prominent In the young society work
I The groom was born in Michigan.
BI5EBIU 'RESULTS
AMERICAN LEAGUE.
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
At Brooklyn— R. I
Philadelphia ...
Brooklyn ......
Batteries—Hix
Coombs and Me
and Killifer, Smith
R. 11. E.
At Boston—
New York ............
Boston .......................2 5 J
Batteries—Tesreau and McCarty; Ty
ler, Barnes and Gowdy, Tragressor.
BAKER IS INJURED.
Polo Grounds, N. Y. t April 14.—J.
Franklin Baker, the crack Yankee third
baseman, had his left thumb broken in
the second inning of today's gnine be
tween he New York and Boston Amer
icans when he was hit by a wide pitch
delivered by Pitcher Pennock. The in
jury may keep Baker out of the game
for a month at least.
ARIZONA MINING MEN
PAY BUTTE A VISIT
Walter Douglas, president of the
Arizona Copper company and head of
the United Verde Extension, and Mr.
Greenway. a prominent Arizona min
ing man, left Butte last night west
over the Milwaukee in the former's
private car. They made a short visit
in the city, being joined here by Dr.
L. D. Ricketts and wife, who went
west with them. Dr. Ricketts is fa
mous as a consulting engineer and Is
well known in this city and Anaconda.
He has had a prominent part in the
development of Arizona Copper mines
and was formerly president of the
Groene-Cananea company.
ASKS COMMISSION TO
LOWER WATER RATES
Salem, Ore., April 14.—On discover
ing,the high cost ot water in some
sections is Impeding a state-wide chil
dren's movement for cultivating va
cant lots, Gov. James Withycombe to
day asked the state public servie*
commission to consider permitting tbs
water companies to lower their rates.
The governor said the water compan
ies had been appealed to on patriotic
grounds, but declared they fell back
on the statement that their rates wers
fixed by the commission.
.M Detro
t —
R. H.
E.
Cleveland
1
Detroit * ..
! 3 5
1
Batteries
-Klopfer,
Smith
and *>'.n
el 11.
Billings; B
oland
Cut
ninghar
l and Spen
At Phi lac
lelph
a z
R. H.
E.
Washing to
. 4 10
2
Fblladelphi
.1(1 20
2
Batteries
—Sim
w, Dumont
Jamie
son.
Ayres and
Alns
nil t)i.
Charity; R. J
jhn
son, Myers
and
Schang.
At New
York
_
B. H.
E.
Boston ..
2 7
1
Ni a Vorls
7 8
0
Batteries
Pe
mod
, May's
and C;
dy;
Mogridge
ml
Mi ne maker.
Committee From Chamber of
Commerce Makes Arrange
ments With Band.
Open air conceits in Butte during
the summer months are practically as
smed through the efforts of the Butte
Chamber of Commerce. A committee
arranging the details consists of: A.
Currie, J. L. Bruce, A. J. Davis, J.
H. Rowe and Louis Dreibelbis.
Arrangements have already been
made with the A. C. M. band. A
horns as an additional attraction has
been proposed. Circular letters were
issued today by the committee.
In part the circular reads: "The
ommittee feel that In view of the ar
rangements that can be made, and the
generous offer of the Anaconda com
pany to pay one-half of the amount
to be raised to finance this undertak
ing, it should not be difficult or bur
densome to subscribers to secure the
ther half and thus enable the public,
s well as visitors to our city, to have
the opportunity of enjoying the rendi
tions of this famed musical organiza
tion."
The money to defray half of the ex
penses will be raised by popular sub
scriptions. The place for the concerts
will be designated at a later date.
JOSEPH J. M'GAHEGiLL
VICTIM Of PNEUMONII
Widely Known Among Butte
Musicians—Resident of
City Many Years.
Joseph J. McGaregill, a native of
Boston and for many years connected
with the music business in Butte, died
today in his rooms in the Phoenix
block from nn attack of pneumonia
from which he suffered for two weeks.
For the last few years lie was em
ployed in the Anaconda company's
mine office in the old Dally bank
building.
Mr. McGaregill was the son of a for
mer chief of police of Boston. He
spent many years of his life studying
the piano under the leading artists of
the day in the east. He came to Butte
in 1891 and with his brother-in-law,
C. E. Crowley, became engaged in a
piano and music business here, which
he conducted until 1900, when the firm
sold out and he went into the mines
office. He is survived by his brother
in-law and his sister. Miss Agnes Mc
Garegill, who came here from Dorches
ter, Mass., upon hearing of his illness.
She will accompany the body to Dor
chester tomorrow. Mr. McGaregill was
a member of the Elks of Butte.
MRS. PITTENOUR DEAD.
Mrs. Eliza Pittenour, wife of W. A.
Pittenour, aged 5.8 years, died yester
day in Missoula, according to word re
ceived in the city. She had been a resi
dent of Missoula for seven years,
moving there from Livingston. Phc is
survived by her husband, three broth
ers, David. Frank and Napoleon of
New York: a sister, Mrs. John Mc
Manus, who was at her bedside when
she died, and a nephew, Frank Vatigtm
of Butte, and a niece, Mrs. T. N. ,$Ae-,
phenson of Missoula. The body will
arrive in the city tomorrow and the
funeral will be held at 2 o'clor-k Mon
day afternoon, with burial in the
Mount Moriah cemetery.
M DONALD BABY DEAD.
Allen John McDonald, the 7-day-old
son of Mr. and Mrs. Colin McDonald,
died today at the home, 1124 Hobson
street. The funeral will be held to
morrow afternoon at 2:30 o'clock and
burial will be in the Holy Cross cem
etery.
MANDREWS FUNERAL.
Many friends attended the funeral
services held today in honor of Edward
McAndrews. A mass was celebrated
in the Sacred Heart church this morn
ing in the presence of many friends.
Burial was in the family plot in the
Catholic cemetery.
TOOMEY FUNERAL.
John Toomey's funeral was held to
day with the services consisting of a
high mass in St. Mary's church. Burial
was in the family plot in the Catholic
cemetery-.
DWYER FUNERAL.
Funeral services were held today for
Mrs. Catherine Dwyer, with a mass in
the St. Lawrence church at 9:30
o'clock, which was attended by a large
number. Burial was in the Holy Cross
cemetery.
EVANS FUNERAL.
The funeral of Thomas Evans will be
held at 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon in
the Pythian castle and burial will be
in the Mount Moriah cemetery.
JOHNSON BABY DEAD.
Adele Marguerite Johnson, the Infant
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Axel John
son, died this morning, aged 11 days.
The funeral was held this afternoon
and burial was in the Mount Moriah
cemetery.
NOTICE.
Owing to the prtce of hay and oats
all single horses and buggies from this
date will be $4.00 per day except Sun
days $5.00 per day. All double will be
$8.00 per day from this date on ex
cept Sunday will be $10.00.
P. J. GROGAN,
JIM DAVIS,
mack McDonald.
J. D. MILLER.
MAURICE EGAN —Adv.
CARD PARTY
Tuesday afternoon at K. of P. hall.
—Adv.
You Read It in the
Post the Same Day
The bulk of the world's
daylight press news is
gathered day after day,
at eastern centers, and is
sent out, due to the differ
ence in time, so that it can
be printed and delivered
to the Post's readers at an
early evening hour.
In very large percentage
the Post's circulation cen
ters in Butte and at its bu
reaus in Anaconda, Dil
lon and Deer Lodge. As
every patron of the Post
knows, it is alert with re
spect to the news that is
of direct interest in these
communities.
Carriers deliver it at your
door for 50 cents a month.
It is a pleasant evening
companion in your home.
Butte's best advertisers
use its pages constantly.
It keeps right up with the
ne w j and—•
The Post Takes Good
Care of Local News
You Get the Post at
a Price Thats Low
You Read It in the
I Post the Same Day
SHOP IN THE BI TTE DAILY POST BEFORE YOU SHOP IN THE STORE

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