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The Butte daily post. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1913-1961, April 18, 1917, Image 3

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053058/1917-04-18/ed-1/seq-3/

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15*. W.PARK
3.SVUTH MAIN
Luleys Spring Canned Fruit Sale
April 18 to 25
'•ill he some time be
•ssert now more than
Home fruits nre low, if not entirely Roue, and it
fore fresh fruits arrive. The appetite craves fruit ,
any time of the year.
While canned fruits arc advancing weekly and 1917 pack must of paces
sib set a new record for high prices, I.utey's can still give you the benefit
of n fortunate good buy made during the fall » id winter.
These special low prices should make desserts a feature of every meal
Bin sufficient quantities to last well Into next fall while these low prices
continue through the canned fruit sole, April 18 to 25.
n■___ .„1 „ Fine quality, bro
Pmeapple ken No . 2
,. nn do/ en $1.65; half dozen.....83c
rv Finest Hawaiian;
Pineapple extr ., lhil . u s |j ces;
1 ar^c '1V± cans, special, dozen, $2.63;
half dozen, $1.35; 2 cans........45c
PI,.me F - X,ra qualify of Green
I Hin.S (; a g e plums for table
same: special, dozen $1.95; half
(lo/enl $1.00; 3 cans.............50c
r • Select table grapes;
ufftp^S large 2V4 cans, special,
dozen $2.10; half dozen........$1.10
Choice pie or table
UrapcS quality; large 2^ cans,
$1.93; half dozen, $1.00; 3
. ,,, '...... 50c
O ..L„. Finest perfect fruit
reaches ln th | ( . k ,. k . h svnip;
quality; extra special, dozen
$'2.90; half dozen .............$1.45
S e _
good syrup: large 2H
ins' special, dozen $2.10; half
dozen .......................*1-10
P„;, r l,pt Kxtrn quality fruit;
reîtent?» r | c fi syrup; large 2%
miis; special, dozen $2.65; half
dozen. $1.35; 2 cans for.........45c
K * Finest 35c quality;
ApriCOtS perfect f ril it ; large
cans ; extra special, dozen $2.90;
half dozen ....................$1.45
Anrirnts Kxtra 'I'uil'ty for
2\pri -OW sauce; half or sliced
fruit : large W, cans, special $2.50;
i.ilf dozen $1.25; 2 cans........43c
Anrirot* ' holce quality, large
rtpri^OTS 244 cans, special, per
dozen, $2.10; half dozen for....$1.10
Ppare Finest extra quality of
Cttr ® Bartlett pears; large
35c 2H can, extra special, dozen
12.90; half dozen ..............$1.45
Pparc Choice quality; large
I o 2 x /z can; special, dozen
$2.25; half dozen .............$1.15
Ppoye Extra .quality BarUett
pears; large 2% can
dozen $2.50; half dozen, $1.25; 2
way to
Prunes^ c 0
a i unco .»P,, h»
Gallon Fruits
buy fruit—when this size is to«»
much to use at one time, heat the
remaining portion and seal in the
usual Mason or Sealfast jar.
Finest Texas quality in
* thick syrup; large No. 10
can; extra special, half dozen, $6;
fan ...........................$1.00
f"*V% App I û « Fine black pitted
V^nernes cherries; an abun
dance of flavor; large No. 10 can,
special, half dozen, $4.40; can 73c
C'KprriPQ little r e d pitted
v^uciricb cherrieq; extra qual
ity; No. 10 can, special, half dozen
$5; can ........................85c
Loganberries ?, 0 c li 1 ! , ril ! > s a r ,!f
splendid pic quality and w ith
sugar added exceptionally nice for
sauce; No. 10 family size can; half
dozen $3.25; can ................60c
solid pack
prunes; nice pie qual
ity; with sugar added, splendid
sauce Item; No. 10 can, half dozen
$2.25; can 40c
Oaqm. Finest large California
* cars Bartlett pears in syrup;
a perfect sauce item; $1 No. 10 can,
special half dozen $1.40; can ..75c
Ghoice bulf Peaches;
rt;acnes | a ,. Rt . No ln n ,„ ha | f
dozen $2.75; can ...............S 0 c
Ctt ttiin Tomato catsup, pint ho!
V.al8Up |k ,. speciat .........20c
Roast F-ef "ÄrS
dem; mammoth 55 can, special 45c
Flour Pastrv four. best and
cheapest for pastry; 49
lh sack $2.155; 24H-1I, sank special
.........................$1.10
Mille for all pur
poses where fresh milk is
used, dozen ..................$1.10
ÎVÆ^afro At the meat department.
J VIeats Phone 2280.
Fine corned beef, lb ........ . 12V£c
Salt spareribs, lb ...............15c
Pickled ham, Ih ................28c
SAVE S. & H. TRADING STAMPS. AN ADDED SAVING TO EVERY PI It
CHASE AT U TEY'S.
PROPOSES Il CRUT
'epresentative Asks Govern
ment to Encourage Produc
tion in This Way.
The Post's Washington Bureau.
ston, D C„ April U If con
f* 88 Should pass a hill that has been
Introduced hy Representative William
, » ox of Indiana the greatest distri
bution of seeds in the history of the
world would take place in the L T nited
8tates this spring under government
auspices,
Lmler the Cox bill the sum of $5,
U0( \ 000 18 appropriated and made im
mtdiately available "to enalde the de
partment of agriculture to purchase
ami distribute seed supplies for the
farmer."
1 he congressional seed distribution
t,,r many years been a subject of
and ridicule. The proposed dis
kutlun would be 20 times greater
in the spring, when young
n ' an ' s fancy lightly turns to
'noughts of love"—
Engagement Rings
A fe the second thought. We
car O' a selection unsurpassed
'-diamonds, superb, flawless,
ra lan t, in rich, rare settings.
We have them
FROM $25 TO $500
guaranty bond goes with
each ring sold.
Towle - Winterhalter-
Hannifin Co.
- 101 w 'e$t Park Street
Oui
i
;
;
than tiie ordinary annual distribution
through members of congress, for
which $230,000 is appropriated.
Under the present rules each mem
ber of congress is allowed to distrib
ute 28,000 packages to his constitu
ents and under the proposed distribu
tion he would have presumably 560,000
packages to distribute, which would
suggest the necessity of each member
of congress having a seed warehouse in
connection with his office. However,
Representative Cox says that the pro
posed distribution would not he made
hy members of congress hut by the de
partment of agriculture without re
gard to congressional districts and
where the 9eed would do the most
good; also that grains, potatoes and
other seeds would he sent out that are
not now included in the annual distri
button.
The "whereases" of the Fox bill re
cite;
"Nations having an aggregate popu
lation of more than 300,000,000 people
have turned away from the peaceful
fields of Industry and production to the
fields of war, devastation and destruc
tion;
"Europe has mobilized and now has
on tiie firing line a mobile army of
upwards of 2,000,000 men;
"Whereas our nation is now at war
with the imperial government of Ger
many. in which it is contemplated to
raise millions of troops in the United
States;
"Armies must be fed and clothed and
the civilian population of nations now
engaged in war likewise must he fed
and clothed;
"The United States Is the natural
granary of the world with its inex
haustible soil. Its varied climate, its
energetic and industrious urban peo
ple. hacked by knowledge and wisdom,
intrepidity, energy and willingness to
work and toil to produce food to sup
ply armies and civilian populations;
"Latest data and statistics gathered
by the department of agriculture dem
onstrate to a certainty the shortage of
food supply in the United States In
meet, vegetables and cereals;
"The agricultural department,
through its splendid organization, Is
abundantly able and prepared to pur
chase and distribute seed to farmers
where needed if available funds - he
furnished said department for this pur
pose."
Department of agriculture < fflcials
say the great difficulty in the way of
the Fox plan would be in securing the
seeds.
MISSOULA MAN WILL BE
LAND BANK APPRAISER
The Post's Washington Bureau.
Washington, April 18.— W. M. Graves
of Missoula was today appointed ap
praiser of the Spokane Land bank.
Congresswoman Jeanette Rankin has
received an assignment on the public
lands committee of the house.
Lakes
or the
omi
ng
season
freiglit
navlgutio
1 u
ill
open w
ten day
h, accor
III
g t<
M.
J. Seal
general
agent
of
th
e
Beat
Transit
corpor
ition,
who
waa ir
city today from
his
hea
^quarter
Seattle.
"The
east bo a
nd
rat
SB I
orome
tive on
April
20,
M
-. s
oa brook
today.
"We a
Hi
*lpa
e a
record
ness th
is .-»eas
in
on
ac(
ount o
congestion of
fro
ight
i a
rs. No
nouncement ha
is y
ot 1
een ma
to the
opening
P
1RSO
iger
buHine
ESTIBLISH RITES
OR CREAT LIKES
M. J. Seabrook Here From Se
attle Visiting Local
Shippers.
The
have
und and westbound rates
stnhlished on the Great
and
vithln
•ook,
akes
de as
''Business In Seattle is better at the
esent time than at any other time
in the history of the city, due t
large extent to the activity in ship
building circles. They are turning
practically one boat a week at
Seattle."
This is Mr. Seabrook's first visit to
Boitte since last October. He is look
business with the local
shippers. '! am always glad to get
hack into Butte." says Mr. Seabrook,
"to meet my old friends and the ship
pers with whom I have been doing
business for many .years."
MOBILIZING THE FARMS.
of
/
jT.T GALLOWAY
Formerly assistant secretary of
agriculture, he will have charge of the
mobilization of the agricultural In
terests of the nation, co-operating
with the council for national defense.
Most of the 10,000 employes of the de
partment will be at his disposal.
TWO WIVES HEAR JUDGE
SEND BIGAMIST TO PEN
I
Valdosta, Ga. — J. Manning, alias
Martin, who was recently Indicted
here for bigamy, has been sentenced
b.v Judge Harrell in the superior court
to one year In the state penitentiary
without the alternative of a fine. By
agreement. Manning entered a plea of
guilty and asked for mercy.
Before entering the plea Manning's
attorneys attacked the indictment,
which was based on his marriage to
Mrs. Reidletreimer in this city last
December. The attorneys held that as
Manning's second marriage was illegal,
he having a wife at the time, it would
not be possible to convict him of
bigamy on his last marriage in this
city.
The fact that Manning had three
wives was not known when the indict
ment was drawn. Wife No. 2 and
Wife No. 3 were in court, and the for
mer testified to her marriage to Man
ning. It is stated that she lived with
him seven years after learning of his
first marriage.
Both of the wives were visibly af
fected, and Wife No. 2 was in tears
much of the time. Manning has fre
quently expressed his love for Wife
No. 2 and stated that he would re
marry her If he could get out of his
trouble. Both of the women are hand
some, refined looking and members of
good families.
THE POST FOR THE NEWS
It Is by Comparison That
Good Dressers Are
Distinguished
£
DV COMPARISON we
distinguish the best
from the nearly so. So
by comparison we dis
tinguish Jonas clothes
from all others. There is
that about Jonas clothes
thnt proclaims them su
perior. It has taken over
a quarter of a century to
complete the organization
that builds these superior
garments. Discriminating
dressers know this and are
praising our designs and
woolens.
HENRY JONAS & SON
11 EAST GRANITE STREET
WHLKERVILLE NOTES
The Juvenile Templars, a subsidiary
organization of the Independent order
of Good Templars, is planning ou gl\ -
ing its aid in the war by assisting In
the making of bandages. Under the
direction of Mrs. G. J. Stephens and
Mrs. W. H. Williams, the youngsters
will meet in the i. O. G. T. hall in
Walkervllle Friday afternoon alter
school hours tor the first lesson in
making bandages, which will be sent
to Europe for use by the allies.
Mrs. Spencer and daughter or
Whitehall, who have been visiting at
the Oates residence on Dewey's Point
since Sunday, have returned to their
home. Mrs. Spencer was formerly a
resident of Walkervllle.
Mrs. John Rich of Dewey's Point
Is rerorted to be ill at her home;
Mr. and Mrs. Huntsln-'er. Nick Hem
mer and Miss Kate Sullivan, w ho have
spent the winter in Walkervllle, visit
ing at the home of Mrs. I,. J. Mulli
gan, have returned to their ranch near
Conrad, Mont.
Miss Olive Oates, »who has been
visiting for two weeks at the Spencer
home in Whitehall, has returned to
her home at Dewey's Point.
Theodore Moore has moved from the
Palace hotel to South Main street.
John Blewett of «'apltol Hill will
leave In a few- days for Seattle
_
Members
of the
ville lodip*
of the Independent orde
of Good
Templars
enjoyed a haiij
week-end
as guests
of the
lodge in
Anaconda.
They left her
Saturday
evening an
d returned Sund
ay by way
of Gregson
Springs.
Miss Margaret Shea of 210 Toboggan
avenue, who has been visiting hei'
mother over the Easter vacation, has
returned to Missoula, where she is at
tending the Sacred Heart academy.
Mr. and Mrs. Joy Walker are recent
arrivals In Walkervllle. They arc
making their home at 210 Toboggan
avenue.
Mrs. John F. Bowden of 14 Glad
stone terrace, who has been ill at a
local hospital, is rerorted to be stead
ily improving.
W. J. Odger and daughter of Logan.
Mont., have been called to Walkervllle
by the death of Mr. Odger's sister,
Mrs. E. D. Daman.
Mrs. and Mrs. L. L. Price of Dillon
are new arrivals In the Hill city.
N,ch ' ,,s
The I. a dies' Aid
Methodist church
I Thursd
f the Mount Bethel
•hurch will bo entertained
fternoon at the church par
's. William Kitt and Mrs.
The son of Mr.
Stephens of Tobogc
at his home.
id Mrs. G core
Members and friends of the Mount
Bethel Methodist church are requested
not to forget the "conundrum" suppt
and apron and necktie social to l
given In the . hurch Friday night,
program will bo furnished.
BASEBALL RESULTS
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
At Brooklyn R. H. E.
New York...................8 9 0
Brooklyn I
Batteries Snllee, Smith and Middleton and
McCarty ; Coombs and Miller.
AMERICAN LEAGUE.
At Philadelphia R. H. E.
Boston ......... 2 5 1
Philadelphia ............... 0 7 2
Batteries Leonard and Thorima ; Noyes and
Schang.
FOREIGN RECRUITING
BIlL PASSES HOUSE
Washington, April 18.—The Webb
bill to permit foreign governments at
war with Germany to recruit their
citizens in this country for their armies
passed the house today without a roll
call. It has already passed the senate.
PRETTY WEDDING
AT SACRED HEART
Peter McVeigh of Great Falls
Married to Miss Anna
bel Dolan.
A very pretty romance was culmi
nated this morning at the Sacred
Heart church when Mr. Peter Mc
Veigh of Great Falls and Miss Anna
bel Dolan of this city were united in
matrimony at a nuptial high mass by
Rev. Father Venus. The many friends
of the contracting parties were com
pletely taken by surprise at the an
nouncement of the wedding today.
Mr. McVeigh is one of the substan
tial business men of Great Falls, being
a member of the firm of Pupore &
McVeigh, railroad contractors, and is
w»ll known and highly esteemed
throughout the entire northwest.
The bride is a charming daughter
of Montana, having been born in Ana
condu and educated at the Sacred
Heart Convent of Missoula. She wore
u beautiful gown of white crepe do
ith white picture hat and car
ried white
Sli.
her sister, Mary, wl
ided
mas
« The bi ide v
awn y by
her
aunt, Mrs. W. E. Kline,
who was
ihc
hostess at the wedding
»rcakfast *
sen
ed' in lier apartments ln
he Nap
ton.
M
r. and Mrs. McVeigh st
arted on
thel
honeymoon this morn!
lg going
ea st
on the Milwaukee and
will visit
io was similar
>wnod and who carried pink roses. .
McVeigh's best man was his '
tier, James McVeigh of Butte. Mrs. I
f-s McVeigh sang the solos at the I
New York, Philadelphia, Balt____
and Boston. They will return in about
two months and make their home in
Butte.
EXPERT TO BE U. S.
FOOD DICTATOR
m
» WOOD vUNDEitTOOD 2j
■■■■■■■■■■■■IIP
■till
HERBERT
HOOVER..
Hoover, American engineer and
chairman of the Belgian relief commis
sion, has been named by President
Wilson as head of a commission to
take charge of the growing, sale and
distribution of food» in this country.
SUBSCRIBE FOR THE
BUTTE DAILY POST
UNDERTAKERS.
COLEMAN- -The remains of Patrick
Coleman are at Sherman A Reed's un
dertaking parlors. Notice of funeral
luter.
SHERMAN & REED
Undertakers and Fmhalmera
Automobil« and Carriage Equipment
131-135 East Broadway
Phones 57 and 58
LAM AX—The funeral of the late
Mrs. Emma Laman will take place to- '
I morrow morning at 9 o'clock at
i Walsh's undertaking parlors, proceed
ing to St Lawrence's church, where
high mass will be celebrated at 9:30.
' Interment in Holy Cross cemetery.
Automobiles. Mrs. Laman leaves her
husband. Edward Laman, and three
; brothers. Felix and Josej h Ogier and
j John Cheramy, all of Butte.
i REJINOVICH—The funeral of Ma
I tilda, the beloved daughter of Mr. and ,
1 Mrs. George Rejinovich, will take place
I tomorrow afternoon at the family resl
| dence, 2024 Yew street, with services
at the Holy Savior church at 2 o'clock.
Interment in the family plot in Holy
I Cross cemetery. Automobiles.
HUDDLESTON Mary Ann Huddle
ston, aged 90 years, died last evening
at the residence. 310 West Granite
street, where the funeral will be hell
I Friday morning at 9 o'clock, proceed
' ing to St. Patrick's '-hurch, w here high
i mass will be celebrated at 9:30. In
! terment in Catholic cemetery. Friends
{are requested to omit flowers
M. J. WALSH
F onersl Director snd Embalmer
125 Esst Park St.
__ Phons 81___
BROWNING—Richard J. Browning,
aged 40 years, died this morniug at
903 Nevada avenu«. The body is at
Richards' parlors, where the funeral
will take plate at a time to be an
nounced in later papers Deceased
was a member of Victoria lodge. Sons
of St. George.
OPIE—Leonard Everett Opie, the 9
The World's Best Parlor Bed
«Mû fige« !
A whole new shipment just in,
representing every new model,
in all the late finishes of wood
and leather upholstering. If
you are thinking of getting one
of these serviceable parlor beds
we suggest that you make an
early choice, while all of the
styles are here.
Very Handsome as Davenport
When closed and used in the
daytime as a davenport or
davenette, a more handsome
piece of furniture could not
be found.
I *" •
There Are 43 Styles Here Now on Display
See the new models while the display is complete. New ideas in
davenettes, late designs in davenports. Every wanted wood, in
elegant finishes, and the new upholstering will appeal to you.
Kindel Beds Have Splendid Separate Mattress
When you get ready to make a Kindel into a bed for the night,
you do not have to pull away from the wall. Just turn the seat
over, and the springs and upholstering of the davenport disap
pear, and a separate and high-class mattress comes to the sur
face to sleep on.
READY TO SLEEP IN
Kindels are so constructed
that your bedding rolls
away with the mattress,
and when you make it
into a bed again, there is
everything complete and
ready to sleep on, by
very little effort.
If You Live Out of Butte Order by Mail
We Pay the Freight to Your City
Brownfield-Canty Co.
48-54 WEST PARK STREET
Special For This
Week
Hats of (harm and Style;
Specially Priced at
$ 3 . 95 —
$ 6.00
Jin
M 5
Fisher's Millinery
PARK AND MONTANA STS.
Raincoats
Crave nettes, Cnberdin**« «nd Rubherired
Raincoat* protect from *o;t snow* and
April bherwers.
AH size», priced uyuarda from Live
Dollars. The bes>t st
MATTINGLY'S
117 NORTH MAIN
(By Mail— Anythin« You Wish;
month-old son of Mr. and Mrs L. .1
Ople, died this morning at the famil.« j
home, 1041 Nevada avenue. The fu-j
neral was held privately at 4:30 this!
afternoon.
JOSEPH RICHARDS, ^c.
Warrington Richards. Pres, snd Mgr
Funeral Directors and Lmbalmers
15-19 South Montana St.
Pho
307
MURPHY—The funeral of the late
Joseph Murphy, aged 48 years, why
died yesterday morning, will take place
tomorrow (Thursday) morning at 9
o'clock at the residence of his sister,
941 Lewisuhn street, proceeding to the
Immaculate Conception church, where
high mass will be celebrated. inter
ment in the Fatholic cemetery.
LARRY_ DUGGAN
Reliable Undertaker snd Fmhslonef
S22 North Main Stresi
Bell Phone 77«
!
Buy Your Groceries
At Wholesale—It
Buys More
W r E skimp neither in
quality, weight or
measure—and prompt de
livery has always been a
feature of our business.
Catsup —Quart can, good
Catsup, for...... 20c
Preserves —N umber 5
pound can of Preserves
for ........... 81.15
Pickles —Number quart
jar Sour Pickles 30c
Or quart jar Sweet Pickles
for .............35c
Worcestershire Sauce_
Lea & Perrins famous
brand, 65c size for 55c
Or 55c size for . . 30<^
Milk—Medium size cans
Milk. 4 dozen for S 1.50
Or 12 cans for. . §>1.20
Apples—Jonathan Apples,
medium size, solid pack.
SI. 50
Flour —Economy brand,
Montana's finest hard
wheat flour:
fN pounds for SO.50
19 pounds for S3.30
O phones. 1130
Cd and 1131
Economy Wholesale
Grocery Company
601-B06-60.V610 Ft ah Ave.
DANIELS & BILB0A
Undertaker« and Fnibalmer«
Automobil« and Catriaf« F.qutpmenl
I'hone 3*8. 403 South Main SL
Raeldenc« F hon« 5822-J.
__ Offir« Alway Open
SAM R^HITE
funeral Director «nd Embalm«
129 South Main Street
IU1I Phone 311
NOTICE.
People desiring to have lots in Cath
oli cemeteries filled and seeded apply
for peimit at P. T. Dunn's office, 113
Hamilton street. We also wish to an
nounce that Mr. Joseph Xarby is no
longer sexton Catholic Cemetery As
sociation.

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