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The Butte daily post. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1913-1961, April 18, 1917, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053058/1917-04-18/ed-1/seq-8/

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CLEAN UP WEEK
STOP
And Consider What Cleanup Week Means to You and to the Mem
bers of Your Family
YOUR HEALTH SHOULD FIRST BE
CONSIDERED ABOVE AU THINGS
The Chief Organ of the Human System Is the Stomach. Unless
This Organ Is Capable of Performing Its Functions
YOUR HEALTH IS ENDANGERED
Do You Realize What It Means to You if Your Stomach
Is Neglected?
IT MEANS ILL HEALTH
All the Leading Medical Authorities Agree That a Great Proportion of the
Poisons That Are Conveyed to the Stomach Come from the Mouth.
BAD TEETH PRODUCE POISON
CONSIDER WHAT THIS MAY LEAD TO
--NOW
CLEAN-UP WEEK
Decide That Your Teeth Shall Receive First Attention.
Hutto's Leading Dentist. Assisted by Hi*; Staff of Competent Assistants. All of
Whom Are Registered Dentists. Is Ready to He of Service to You.
I Publish a Price List and Live Up to It
I MAKE
?'© gold crowns for ..... $5.09
$10 hridgework. per tooth.....................$5.00
$20 pistes for .. .......................... 510.09
Plates repaired for ........................$1.50
Porcelain and enamel fittings to match your teeth
as low as .................. $2.50
Teeth extracted .............. $1.00
Children*» teeth extracted ...... 50c
An Iron-Clad Written
Guarantee
for fifteen years that is as good
as a government bond, with all
work done in my office.
DR. RINCKEL
o Broadway ^ CLARK S RANK
z l ' est tyroacw ay LADY ATTENDANT
Phone 226* W
HUTTE
Anaconda Office, Gnose
Bldg. Dr. Gil!, Mgr.
BELIEVES CENTML PIERS
IRE 0NJTO10 PEACE
(Continued from Pape One.)
The Yossische Zeitung of Berlin «ays
that as condition» of returning to w< rk.
the strikers demanded a sufficient sup
ply of bread and potatoes, pr«-pev «iis
&
"That-little Smith-girl
ahov-S locks • SC' r.ics !"
Da
v children?
ik -Stylish • and. • d£
pendabl« ^anur> Cncsi
lend • ike ■_ ir.al • lever.
that-mekes -th* ■ dirhems
and • ina: - prompt - iueh
complimentary • rsmarAi
I
URGENT YEARNING FOR
PEACE AND FOOD AMONG
MASSES IN GERMANY
The Hague. Tuesday. April IT (via
London. April 18». —How urgent is the
yearning for peace among the German
people and how great :s the increased
strain just imposed on them In conse
quence of the reduction of the bread
ration may be judged from the exhor
es of woeful al
ternatives published in provincial
newspapers on the inauguration of the
curtailment of the bread supply. The
Courier <-f Hanover. f«-r example, rep
resents that a quick but unsatisfactory
poar-e would not lead to a better food

Great Britain. France. Italy and even
the United States are reckoning with
a world famine for the coming year
and that instead of solving the fo«»d
problem by a premature conclusion of
pea*.e the demands of these countries
for their own needs would prevent the
supplying of German:» with foreign
foodstuffs.
More Sacrifices.
The Courier portrays the British
people as paylmt the highest grain
prices of a century and declares that
the Germans are situated more favor
ably than those who planned to starve
them, not being menaced by a bad
world crop and rapidly sinking ship
tonnage. If. however, the blockade of
Germany should succeed through lack
of economy, the newspaper says, "our
f
bitter hunger, but also a lone period
of lowest wages and the most [ain
ful enfeeblement. Then while France,
R
Lorraine, Tr'.wet. the Trentino, Con
stantin«-pie ar.d big Austro-Hungarian
provinces as the price of peace, Great
Britain will undertake the long
planned assassination of our economic
rights. Bread would be dear, and
wages low for our entire laboring
population. We must therefore mus
ter ail of our strength, clinch our
teeth ar.d. remembering the sacrifices
and sufferings of our men folk in the
field, hold out and take up this new
food sacrifice."
j
j
j
;
ï
i
1
THE BUTTE DAILY POST
POSTS YOU ON THE NEWS
ms CONVICTION BASED
UPON FUSE TES TIMONY
(Continued from Page One.)
tri. t Attorney Fickert and Edward
Cu -.ha. assistant prosecutor, as having
h.ol knowledge that he was to testify
falsely to support Oxman's story. In
signing the warrant. Police Judge
Matthew* Brady said: "It is custom
•' ■ to g<t the approv&l
of the district attorney to such a war
rant as this but in this case I don't
think it will be necessary."
Fickert planned to bring Kigali'»
charges before the grand jury but
Chief White refused to adopt that
method, preferring to bring the evi
dence int«« open court. Oxman arrived
here last night. Kigali arrived this
morning.
1 Oman's bail was fixed at $2.500
cash or $5.000 bond.
Kigali in his statement to Chief
White detailed conversations he had
with < aman after his arrival here
Jan. 6 during the Mooney trial in re
sponse to letters and telegrams from
Oxman.
Their Conversation.
All you have to do is to say you
saw me in San Francisco July 22,* "
1 »xrr.an told Rigall. according to the
latter.
" Bu * I w asn't here then—I w as
never here.' "
You were as much here as I was.* "
» »xman rej lied, according to Rjgall.
'* 'They will prove my testimony
false.' " Kigali said.
" 'Never mind that—the state will
j take care of its witnesses,' " Rigall
j said Oxman replied,
j Kigali did not testify, but he said
; District Attorney Fickert gave him
ï $100. Oxman had promised him $250
i personally, Rigall said.
1 When the warrant for Oxman's ar
rest was asked of Judge Brady, a rep
resentative of the district attorney's
office opposed its issuance.
"I want to say to your honor," said
Thomas O'Connor, attorney for the
bomb defendants, "that the district at
torney's office is a party to this con
spiracy."
"Smith is certainly stuck on him
self. isn't he?" remarked Brown.
"He sure is." agreed Jones. "Why,
If he ever tried to sw*a!lo\v his pride
he would choke to death."
EICHT HOHE FOR
Ï
Recruiting Officers for Land
and Sea Forces Have
a Busy Day.
Eight mon applied for enlistment In
the army and nav> at the loenl re
' cruiting offices In the courthom
day. Four applicants for mint
to the army are mnh-rgoing ph
examination this afternoon and will
•filial mont papers t» ht Th
'applicants for the iihvj are a
qualifying this afternoon, while o
'John M. P. Valpatle. a 16-year-old
Austrian boy. qualified for enlistment
as an apprentice seaman.
Chief Gunner's Mate \V. R. Stevens
arrived from Salt I.nke this mornlnu
assist In recruiting here. 11» has
! been in the service for 14 years
Moth P. K. Harlan and J Stover,
the local army recruit in
kept busy today nn
swertng inqu
concerning enlistmen
it. and they
ticipate that er»' th»
' day is ovei
least eight or ten i
remits will 1
been enlisted.
Advancement
is Rapid.
In support of thtu
contention
the United Btaus .
it my now ot
more opportunities

ver before In its hlsto
recruiting ofrirorn
U
day
ited the
e
cent net
ion of th«
\\
ar dt
partaient
in
picking
100 none
'in
uissh
ned offlet
rs
from si
compan
es.
now
on the 1
a
eific col
st. and c<
tnmlssio
led them
ns
second
lleutenan
s.
first
lieu tenai
ts
and cap
talus. Tl
cs
mer
had pit
i
ously bt
'en repor
ed
for
'ommisMt
ns
by their
captains.
'I
lie 111
*n advan»
.■»I
were p;
rticularlv
l
of tc ic
nt as di
111
masters.
and the
at
my
lust now
is
short of
commission
'd officers.
P. D
Dorn, wh
V
as (1
si'barged
16
'ears ago yrsterd
iv
fr» 'in
the Thirt
\ -
fourth i
ifnntry. a

1 mite
>r regime
it.
re-enlisted last ni
*ht
as a
i rtvate
More
than enoi
gh
men
to form
n
regiment
are 1.
g
mllst
'd dail>
the regular armj.
U\
»tilin
to the w
ar
department, recoi
ds
of
which sin
»W
that for
the five
.1,1
s er
ding Sati
r
day nicht a total of 7.171 men were re
, cruited. Enlistments In the navy Sat
urday an»l Monday totalled i men
bringing the combatant tone up t«
71.696 men.
U. S. SHIPS GUARD
4.000-MILE LINE
Qr*
\}Ki
«SEKT
NOK? -K
■BERMUDAS
CHARLESTON
If AAVA1\.XAH \
Öüackscnvilld»
jt* A ' * -J
'>•- N
viren u
JAMA.l<5SrS>
fcICC
ctr*
*2?
PAHAM
,3ü AIT2.RÏ
This shows the immense territory
I nited States navy vessels are guard
ing. from Halifax to the Panama canal,
following an agreement with the allies
to protect shipping on this side.
SPECIAL RATES FOR
MEETING AT FALLS
Lo< al railroads announce a rate of a
fare and one-third for the annual state
meeting of the Parent-Teacher asso
ciation at Great Falls, April 26, 27 and
**• The will be April 26
to April 28. with return limit April 30.
All purchasers of tickets are required
to secure certificates.
MURPHY FUNERAL.
The funeral * t Joseph Murphy, aged
«S years, who died yesterday, will be
held Thursday morning at 9 o'clock,
proceeding from the home of his sis
ter. 941 Lewisohn street, to the Im
maculate Conception church, where a
mass will be celebrated. He Is sur
vived by three sisters. Misses Ella and
Teresa and Mrs. Mary Hartman; a
niece, l.ucllle Hartman: four brothers,
Thomas. "William. Michael and Peter,
all of Butte
RAGINOVICH BABY DEAD.
Matilda Rabinovich, the 18-month
old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George
Kaginovieh, died yesterday at the
home. 2024 Yew street. The funeral
will be held at 2 o'clock Thursday
afternoon with aervlces in the Holy
Savior church Burial will be In the
family plot in the Holy Cross cem
etery.
HIGH SCHOOL CIRCLE.
The high school circle of the Parent
Teacher association will meet this
evening at the high school auditorium.
Superintendent W. E. Maddock will
give an address and Miss Tenner will
be heard in vocal selections.
Men!Here sNewSpvm
SUITS at
Fine in Quality of Weaves-Smartly Tailortf
S UITS that have every appearance of costing much more u
their modest $20 price—in the smart new styles as W(1 i]
the more conservative models—in neat mixtures', plain bi u ,. ai
black, and in sizes to fit every size man. or
New Spring Topcoats and Rain-proof Coals
In Splendid Array at Very Moderate Prit
New
Knox
and
Stetson
Hats
$3.50
to $5
Men s Bathing Suits Men's Fine Pi
In the new vivid shades and in
grays, blues and black; ready
with a most complete assort
ment at all prices from $2.50
to $7.50.
nces
manias
In many weaves—soisettes ox.
ford cloth, silktex and |' )Ure
silk. All the new spring
are ready now, priced from
$1.50 to $10.
NEW MANHATTAN SHIRTS
FINE NEW NECKWEAR
Ami all that is new and fine in men's furnishings ready for in
stant selection in the men's store at Hennessy's.
A
rrow
Coll
ars
Hennessys
A rrow
Hollars
The Prisoners Number 14.000.
Twelve Cannon and Many
Small Arms Taken.
(Continued from Png* One.)
under him had nothing to do but bil
low instructions to the letter.
Infantry Sweeps Forward.
As soon as the result of the battle
hetw et
n S<
issotis
and
Rhe
ms was
know n
the
order
vas glv
en t»
attack.
Punctually
it 4:45
the Fr
»noh
infantry
"wont
over'
well
apport»
»! b>
a pow
er ful
nass
of artillery.
The
swept
for war
d in
inagn
firent
style
and in
two h
ours
the fi
st line
8 VS
« in had
been «
apt ui
ed. 14
iter net
vs Cl
me that
the Fi
ench
s»» Idle
•s were
can
ying all
before
them and
taking
pris»
nets by
the sc
ore.
Tho>
seized Mont
'arnillct,
Mont
Haut
and
til the
cres
ts com
ma tiding th
regio
i.
Difficult Positions.
From their new positions the French
now look down upon MoronvilUers and
Kaurov. This Moronvtllers chain of
hills was regarded by all French sol
diers who had ever been In the sec
tion as virtually impregnable and its
capture caused the liveliest satisfac
tion to everybody. The 75's followed
up the Infantry rapidly and were soon
In action. They caught large bodies
if the enemy massing with the object
of making a diversion and decimated
them. According to onlookers, such
carnage had not been seen since pH*
action of Charme Gap nt the begin
ning of the war.
On the Other Front.
On the right wing the struggle was
equally to the advantage of the
French. Auberlve. on which the left
wing of the French offensive of 1915
broke, fell speedily, as well as all the
surrounding works. The French made
especially good progress nortli of
Auberive. In the section cost of
Yaudeslncourt, Hill 112 was stormed,
as well as a small wood east of the
hill, which was a regular nest of Ger
man machine gnns.
Go Four Miles Forward.
At certain points the advance was
cU.se upon four miles in depth. The
latest news reaching Paris says the
battle continued well into the night,
the Germans counter attacking with
out success and the French recon
structing the trench systems under the
-over of their artillery.
According to information from a re
liable source the double offensive of
the British north of Arras and of tile
trench on the Afsne disarranged the
German plans Field Marshal von
Hlndenburg, it is declared, was pre
paring an offensive against Riga and
another agnlnst Italy, while on the
western front he was considering an
attempt on Calais on the one hand
and on Paris on the other. The allied
western offensive spoiled all this by
obliging him to bring hack a large
part of the effectives intended for the
Russian and Italian fronts.
GERMANS CLAIM 3,000
PRISONERS AND ALLEGE
THEIR LINE HELD FAST
Berlin, April 18 (via London).—The '
number of prisoners taken by the I
Germans on the French battle front I
yesterday, according to the official i
statement issued today by the Ger
man arm> hradq
1er« staff,
tan 3.000
French attacks in the Champagne
Yesterday over a 12-mile front, tho
German statement adds, were prevent
ed from piercing the Teuton lines by
tho German barring positions. Part
of the wood between MoronvilUers and
Aubervlo was wrested with consider
able violence from French troops
which had reac hed there. During the
fighting on April 16 26 of the numer
ous French armored motor cars were
destroyed.
German forces In Macedonia, the
German official statement says, drove
the French from positions one kilo
meter wide on the Crvena Stena which
were captured by the French last
March.
BRITISH HOLD GROUND
AS SUPPLIES COME UP
British lloudquartei'8 in France,
April 18 (via London». (From a statt
correspondent of the associated press.)
(Operations on tho British front may
lu said to have reached a temporary
holding stage along the line of the re
cent advance. Toward Lens and St.
Quentin the process seems to be one of
absorption. Minor assaults here and
there are improving the British posi
tions, but the general battle scheme is
awaiting the development of its next
stages.
War operations involving such num
bers as are now opposed on the west
ern front necessarily move in waves.
The work of bringing up supplies, guns
and munitions during apparent lulls
often is more strenuous than the actual
assaults and It is of equal importance
The British plunge forward in Faster
week reached a greater depth in a
shorter time than any attack on such
large scale since entrenched warfare
began on this front. The total of 227
guns brought in, together with ammu
nition by the thousands of rounds and
other supplies, exceeds any haul made
during a similar period of the wai
What Germans Expected.
All German documents which have
been captured show- that the enemy
knew an offensive was being planned
about Arras because of the massing
of troops and batteries.
It is evident, however, that the Ger
mans expected their first or second
lines to hold. This was particularly
true of their conditions on VJmy
Ridge, which was the northern Gibral
tar of the Hindenburg line.
The operations about Lens are pro
ceeding. The British already hold po
sitions on all the western approaches,
although the city itself lias not been
penetrated. Lens is the central point
of the great mining district which
straddles for miles in all directions. It
is an ideal place to defend against or
dinary attacks, each slag heap and
factory building being an individual
fortress.
,p ln> weather continues to he miser
m
■Jf-i
Try It
Today. You'll
Be Better
Tomorrow.
Senelol
For Tonsilitls, Hoarseness and all
sore throat conditions, used as a gar
f e «» wl * kill the virulent germ ac
Hvity on the inflamed tissue.
Full directions in each carton.
For sale at all druggists in origin
nal Red Cartons.
BLACK
SHOES!
Many women prefer the con
servative, all black shoe. For
this reason we bought heavily,
long before the advance in shoe
prices. While our stock lasts
we can sell at the old pi ices, and
offer you great values in good
black shoes; specially priced ai
$3.501« $5
Colored Kids
In all the good effects and late
combinations.
$5.00 to $18.
51 W. Park St.
able with no sign of spring. The tem
perature was below freezing last niff
with a winter downpour.
BRITISH FORCES PRESS
BEYOND ST. QUENTIN
London, April 18. — The Brlti*
forces have made further P 10 *
north of St. Quentin and have cap
tured the village of Villers-Gm 8
according to an official statemen
en out by the war office toda.v.
statement follows: .-»her
"During the night we made in y
progress southeast and east of '
and this morning captured the '
of Villers-Guislain with some 1 [' *
ers. We also improved our | os 1
the neighborhood of Lagnicoui •
"Elsewhere there is nothin* ra 0
port of special interest. Ilea'.'
is again falling."
THE TEUTON ATTACK IS
REPULSED BY RUSSIANS
Petrograd, April 18 (via 1 '" ml v(0 .
Teuton forces yesterday n,a ®f,' 0 n
lent attack on the Russian P°® |< r aila.
the Danube river northwes ** The
the war office announced °
attackers were repulsed.
M'BRIDE FUNERAL. ^
The funeral of Gordon McJ* 1 i #
nfant son of Mr. and Mrs. • * % :.

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