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The Butte daily post. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1913-1961, April 19, 1917, Image 1

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WEATHER FORECAST
Εje Putte Datb jtost
WEATHER FORECAST
MONTANA—Generally fair tonight and
'hursday; warmer went and central por
VOL. 5. NO. V
BUTTE MONTANA. THURSDAY. APRIL 19. 1917
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
ILSON IS Dt.'RMINED
CONSCRIPTION .LAN OF
EXPERTS SHALL PREVAIL
csident Says He Will Appeal Direct to the
Country If Necessary to Defeat the
Volunteer Advocates
ouse Military Affairs Committee Sends in Ma
jority and Minority Reports—Senators Dis
cuss the Press Censorship Bill—Many Oppose
Military Limitations of Free Speech.
Washington, April 19.—Debate on the administration
my bill will begin in the house Monday. An agreement
s reached today by house leaders and consideration of
e measure is expected to last from two to three days,
ajority and minority reports will be filed with the clerk
the house on Saturday. The bill as amended by the
mmittee was introduced today by Chairman Dent. It
as immediately referred back to the committee for the
rfunctory report. Mr. Dent expects to report the bill
ionday and take it up in the house Tuesday. The house
Ijourned this afternoon until Monday.
*
n the senate the military committee
1 voted 10 to 7 to recommend the
ninistration bill virtually as it was
pwn by the army general staff. This
» to be reported today and It may be
sed by the senate without awaiting
se action.
President Determined.
President Wilson was still de
rmined that the selective draft plan
ould prevail and it seemed probable
at if necessary he would appeal di
pt to the people on the ground that
! nation's safety depends on prompt
ictment of the general staff bill,
preparing to lead the light In the
use for the administration bill, Rep
lentative Kahn, ranking republican
the military committee, conferred
(day with Secretary Baker.
It is expected Mr. Kahn will present
jlth his minority report, a letter from
leretary Baker sent to Chairman
*nt two days ago In a final effort to
th* mmittee to approve the ad
ation plans which outline
* he purpose of the military ex
■ provide places for 750,000 in
il volunteers in the expanding
»my and national guard and
reasons for distrusting any
?heme for taking into the service
Unplete volunteer units as proposed
the majority of the house commit
[Representative Kahn will have avail
fcle als., i detailed study of England's
sruggU with the volunteer system
lade by American military experts
personally watched the process. It
understood these reports graphically
' the failure of the system under
'»test test in history and point
Mtinued on Page Twelve.)
j
OPTI O N FOB HMD
alest Plan to Settle Trou
bles Will Be Announced to
Parliament Thursday.
1 '' April 19.—The Manchester
... an l;,n sa > s that it is virtually cer
nni lt * >lomler Lloyd George will
ounce thn government proposal for
, , i S T Uor of the Irish question on
f uraday. The scheme will be based
' oLinty option, with some arrange
nt. , U J* Ke °ping the counties that
, tt Ka nat rul ° in orderly relation to
^eglslation of the Dublin parlia
osa * "iü Put the home rule
W»nV?, rce at once * and while it is
TPosJ th lat hoth 1,iah Parties will
'either He „ 81 ieme ' U 18 bel| eved that
he U \! ,,orsiat in their resistance
hie an savH thnt seems prob
ieideril ^* r Edward Carson has
- 1 ° the premier's solution.
-
two years.
LUB UNANIMOUSLY FAVORS
SELECTIVE CONSCRIPTION
, n ar ' a " s Pledge Themselves
Wi^nd Behind President
A "J All War Measures.
Bntto^u F ole the North
Address MakeS 30 E,0qUent
thTnft 1 , ' rlKht sunshine will glad
M u *<- nrese „ ° f Eur °I>e at the cloee
U war and to the L'nited
IS DETERMINED
TO FIGHT IT OUT
New Government at Petrograd
Will Not Weaken Resist
ance to Enemy. •
Petrograd, April 19 (via London).—
Russia's allies need have no fear that
she will desert the alliance or weaken
her resistance to the enemy, Prof.
Paul Milukoff, the foreign minister,
said today, in an address to the rep
resentatives of British and French
workingmen who are now ln Petro
grad.
"We understand that in the moment
of the revolution you might be afraid
we would lose our strength for re
sistance," said the foreign minister. "I
beg you to announce to your country
men that free Russia has become
doubly strong through democratiza
tion."
"Russia will continue the crusade for
annihilation of German militarism with
the greatest intensity, for our ideal is
to prevent all possibility of war In the
future. Our present problem consists
j of organizing our forces of defense,
shaken by the revolution. We shall
(Continu
IYge Sev
MAY SUSPEND WORK
ON SOME M L SNIPS
Proposal Made to Give Ship
yards Chance to Build Mer
chant Ships Quickly.
Washington, April 19.—Temporary
suspension of construction work on
the five new battle cruisers and also
on other capital ships is under con
sideration, Secretary Daniels said to
day, so that the steel shipbuilding in
dustry may be concentrated on con
struction of merchant ships to make
good submarine losses.
Plans so far made are only tenta
tive and nothing will be permitted to
Interfere with the prompt completion
of fighting craft now well advanced in
construction or to hinder the building
of new destroyers, scout cruisers,
submarines and other small vessels
which can be completed in less than
two years.
States will come the glory of bring
ing the God-given freedom of the west
to the blood-spattered plains of the
east," declared T. F. Cole, president
of the North Butte Copper Mining
company, at the close of an impas
sioned address before the Butte Rotary
club today In favor of universal mili
tary training and selective conscrip
tion. It w*as the most enthusiastic
meeting the organization has yet held
and Mr. Cole's remarks brought tre
(Contlnued on Page Twelve.)
IN THE WAKE OF THE NEWS.
e^/VCZ Æ 'Tts/r GRFA.'Y
ÇÆQfSisS yc/VoAr C</r (AJfSr
«5.
x->
i
:
7 »"
'r'Otj'vry
VO /qyy ^
41
r//.f a MArrso/zrDg re c -rn/E \sc^/vrs' -A
GERMA 'y *>i»r ON Tn£ StKjHTES'T PA?0o0CA.-r/0/v
—From the Portia.« Oregoi
Hoarding oi Provisions by Consumers
May B ecome a Disaster to tke Nation
BERLIN DECLARES THERE IS NO
GERMAN SUBMARINE IN WESTERN
ATLANTIC; DENIES SMITH ATTACK
Berlin, April 19 (via London).—It is officially announced that
there is no submarine as yet in the western part of the Atlantic. The
statement follows:
"The Reuter telegram regarding an attack by a German subma
rine on the American destroyer Smith can be described only as a frivo
lous means of attributing to, Germany the opening of hostilities. In
fact no submarine is yet in the western half of the Atlantic."
MRS. DANSEREAU KILLS
HER HUSBAND AS CLIMAX
TO SERIES OF BEATINGS
Oyster Cocktail Vendor Stopped on Stairs of His Home by Bul
let From Wife's Gun as He Ascended, Apparently to Renew
Attack. Woman Shows Officers Black and Blue Bruises in
Proof of Her Story of Cruelty. Four Children Orphaned by
the Mother's Act.
As the climax to a series of beatings which left her body a mass
of black and blue bruises, Mrs. Laura Dansereau shot and killed her
husband, Art L. Dansereau, an oyster cocktail vender, at the family
home, 1212 East Second street, shortly before 8 o'clock this morning.
Mrs. Dansereau fired one shot at her husband as he mounted the
stairs apparently with the intention of repeating an attack of the early
morning and the bullet took effect in the left shoulder, cutting the
sub-clavian artery, ranging downward and probably penetrating the
heart. Mrs. Dansereau surrendered herself immediately after the
shooting to City Detectives Frank White and Joe Williams and is
being detained at the City Emergency hospital pending an investiga
tion by the county attorney's office
The couple's four children, the eld
est of whom is 15 and the youngest
8 years of age, and Dansereau's moth
er, Mrs. Louis DanBereau, wife of a
local expressman, were In the house
at the time of the shooting, but did not
witness the actual firing of the shot,
although they were In a room which
adjoins the hall and stairway, where
the tragedy occurred.
Woman's Story.
Mrs. Dansereau told police officers
upon their arrival, and her statement
is backed up by the testimony of
neighbors, that her husband had an
ungovernable temper and that for the
past three or four years he beat her
frequently. To the coroner and the
detectives she exhibited bruised and
contused breasts, a veritable mass of
black and blue bruises, and numerous
black and blue welts on her body in
proof of her assertion that she had
been terribly beaten. She declared
that it was only when she believed that
her life was in danger that she took
a revolver, which had always been
kept under the pillow of their bed, and
fired at Dansereau as he ascended the
steps. She expressed contrition and
when full realization of what had hap
pened came to her she became hys
terical.
No Triangle Here.
Neither drink nor another man or
woman figured In the domestic dlffi
(Continued on Page Nine.)
MORE BRITISH HOSPITAL
SHIPS UNDER ATTACK
London, April 19.—There have been
further losses recently of British hos
pital ships which will be published
shortly, Andrew Bonar Law, member
of the war council, announced in the
house of commons today.
BESTBICTIl OF
SALES NECESSARY
IN SOME STUPFES
Only the Holding Off of Pan
icky Consumers Can Sta
bilize the Market.
MILLERS UNABLE TO
SHIP THEIR PRODUCT
Price of Bread Soon Will Be
Advanced—Canned Goods
Prices Soaring.
Chicago, April 19. — Notable ad
vances marked the first half hour of
trading in wheat futures today. May
rose 794 cents to $2.40 and July 8'4
cents to $2.05'/2. May wheat sold at
$2.43 before the close of the session.
There was a complete recovery on
prices from yesterday's slump oc
casioned by the removal of duty on
Canadian wheat. At Minneapolis the
flour mills were reported swamped by
shipping orders and embarrassed by
inability to get enough cars. Last
week the flour output increased 28,055
barrels as compared with the same
week a year ago. Sales, however,
were made at prices hitherto un
known. Demand from the larger deal
ers fell off, but that from the family
trade increased.
Purchase of canned goods for sum
mer delivery has pushed up the price
of the new crop, not yet planted, in
some instances 100 per cent. Tho re
mainder of last* year's canning has
risen proportionately. Housewives
have taken fright and are laying in
huge stocks at huge prices.
Limits on Marketing
The enormous purchase of canned
goods and other staples has forced
many retailers to set limits on mark
eting. Grocers in residential districts
declare that the demand for supplies
has been so great that they cannot
meet it. Restrictions have been placed
on the sale of canned goods, flour,
sugar and soap. It Is hoped that by
holding off consumers who are panic
stricken the market may be stabilized.
Hoarding May Bring Disaster.
"This hoarding threatens to become
a disaster to the nation," said Sol
Westerfeld, president of the National
Retail Grocers' and Butchers' associa
(Continued on Buge Seven.)
SHIFTING BATTLE
NOW MOVES AWAY
FROM THEM
Last Teutonic Stronghold. 0c
i copied Nearly Three Years.
Has Been Captured.
FRENCH ARMIES TEAR
ON THE GERMAN FRONT
: Quarter of a Million German
Reinforcements Unable
to Hold Neville.
THE WAR SUMMARY.
German/ has thrown a quarter of a
million fresh troops Into the fray on
the 60-mi!e sector of the western front
between Soissons and Aberive and still
is unable to check the French advance.
LAST GERMAN HOLD
ON THE AISNE LOST.
Both north of the Aisne and in the
Champagne, General Neville's forces
are pressing forward. The last strong
hold of the Germans on the Aisne was
taken with the capture of the Va illy
bridgehead yesterday and their waver
ing lines continued last night to be
pushed rapidly northward.
THREE-MILE WEDGE
PIERCES GERMAN FRONT.
From Ohavonne, on the Aisne, the
French have driven more than three
miles north of the river despite des
perate resistance by Von Illndenburg's
reinforced armies. In the Champagne
the French have driven a great wedge
more than three miles deep into the
German line between Rheims and Au
berlve, and last night's attacks netted
General Neville's men several Import
ant heights in the Moronvilllers re
gion. ,
HEAVY CAPTURES OF
MEN AND SUPPLIES.
Me
chile the British
quiescent
so far as th« official accounts show,
awaiting their turn to strike the other
flank of the Von Hindenburg line.
The French have so far taken more
than 17,000 prisoners in their of
fensive. At last accounts the British
had taken in excess of 11.000.
The French also have captured near
ly 100 guns.
GERMAN REINFORCEMENTS
UNABLE TO STOP FRENCH
I
j
j
j
I
I
J
j
1
i
10 GROOMS WILL
N0Ï ESCAPE SERVICE
Department Says Men Marry
ing Since War Began Can
not Avoid Duty.
Api
iili- '
de- 1
state
Washingt
tary age who have marrie
state of war against Germai
dared will not escape their
of military service under
partment order formally
today. The department's
follows:
'The war department announces
that all men marricU since the out
break of the war will be treated upon
the same basis as unmarried men in
sofar as their military obligations are
concerned, lt is desired that the ut
most publicity be given by the press
to this announcement."
The department was moved to take
this action in order that all men
should understand exactly what is
contemplated in the organization of an
army to fight Germany. It was de
sired that there should arise no ques
tion of slackers upon the score of
marriages contracted since the out
break of war with the possible con
struction that marriage in any case
was hastened in order that military
duty might be evaded.
GREAT CAMPAIGN TO ADD
TO STATE'S FOOD OUTPUT
Greatest Problem is to Finance
the Farmers So That They
May Multiply Their Culti
vated Acreages for Wheat
and Potatoes.
Helena, April 19. — The Montana
state council of defense, named Tues
day by Governor Stewart, met last
night with the governor in the chair
and immediately set to work to se
cure the greatest possible acreage in
Montana and sow' it with food prod
ucts.
It develoued tiiat a special session
SENDS II BULLET
INTO BRUN OF
FORMER WIFE:
Gus Koski Shoots Woman for
Returning to Butte After
Being Divorced.
NEITHER HAS CHANCE
TO LIVE. SAYS DOCTOR
Man Fires as Woman Flees
From Him to Find Place
of Safety.
A quarrel of six months stand
ing between Gus Koski and «his
former wife Hilda Grandroth end
ed at 1:15 o'clock this afternoon
when Koski fired a bullet through
the woman's head and then sent
I its mate through his own brain.
At 3 o'clock hoth were still alive
but, according to City Physician
j T. V. Moore, neithef has a chance
j to live. The shooting happened
j on the porch of the home of the
woman's friend at 219 East Plati
num street. Koski was a miner at
I the Black Rock mine. His former
wife secured a divorce six months
ago and since that time she re
I sided jn Idaho. She came back to
J Butte yesterday. Mrs. Grandroth
has two children by another hus
band.
tVhen Mrs. Grandroth arrived in
r.ntte yesterday afternoon she called
j at the home of her friend on Platinum
1 street and asked for shelter until »bin
i to find Y ork. The retfueat was grant
ed. During the afternoon the woman
' "mil t he St: eets (>f : :
_' ' ' ! ' ! 1 h'nurteei 1
WRITER ATTACKS
Declares Austrian's Peace Par
ley Plan Would Ruin
Germany.
Amsterdam. April 19 (via London).—
The proposal of Count Czernln, Aus
trian foreinn minister, for a peare con
ference of all the belligerents is at
tacked b.v Count ton Reventlow In tha
Berlin Tages Zeitung as meaning ruin
to tho German empire. Von Retent
low declares that ('mint Czerniu took
no account of the fact that the Ger
man empire Is now- lighting a buttle
"which must lead to victory." He de
• lares that a conference on the basis
of the principles recommended by the
Austrian minister would destroy Ger
many internally and externally.
ACTION OF U. S.
Washington. April 19.—Nicaragua
aligned herself with th*» Latin-Am
«an nations endorsing the entry of
Fnited States into the war with C
many, it was announced today.
Reports of anti-German riots in
gentine, wholesale dismissal of
tionals of the central powers f
government workshops and arse
and the order to German resident
evacuate a certain suburban zoni
Buenos Aires are construed here
indicative of the difficulty the Arj
tine government will have in prev
ing itself being forced by its own |
pie into an open br-ak with Germ
of the legislature may be necessary to
finance the state's farmers in their
efforts to multiply the areas of land
to be cultivated.
Present were C. D. Greenfield, state
commissioner of agriculture; Charles
J. Kelly of Butte, Senator J. E. Ed
wards of Forsyth, B. C. White of Buf
falo, Mrs. Tyler Thompson of Mis
soula, Chancellor Elliott of the State
university and Will Campbell, editor
of the Helena Independent—all mem
bers of the council—and Prof. Alfred
Atkins and Professor Hamilton of the
State Agricultural college.
The council decided to attempt to
(Continued on Page Three.)

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