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The Butte daily post. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1913-1961, April 25, 1917, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053058/1917-04-25/ed-1/seq-1/

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WEATHER FORECAST
f, rT TK — Tonight: Unsettled, rain,
' t.mimmtow: Unwilled weather.
VOL. 5, NO. £9.
#
Œïje iButte Batlj» $oôt
___ BUTTE MONTANA. WEDNESDAY. APRIL 25. 1917
WEATHER FORECAST
MONTANA I'riHiMUd w<ath«r Innlfflil
nd Tliiin.I«y. |uobat»ly ruin, Higlilt>
PRICE RVE CENTS.
MERICA'S FIRST SHOT IN T HE WAR SINKS ENEMY SUBMARINE
aval Gunners Aboard Big Steamer Mongolia lei Go With Single Solid Shol at
1,00# Vards Smash Periscope and Send a Lurking U-Boal to Bottom of Ihe Sea
IVER BOAT RlADY
TO LAUNCH TORPEDO
AS SHELL HIT HER
r esscl Was Going at Full Speed. Officers
Watching Through Field Glassei Have
No Doubt Submarine Went to Bot
tom With All Hands
London. Vpril 25.—Captain Rice of the American steam
ip Mongolia, which has arrived at a British port, told
c associated press today that the Mongolia had fired the
rsl gun of (he war for the United States and sunk a
erman submarine. The naval gunners on hoard made a
can hit at 1,000 yards. The periscope was seen to be
altered on hoard. Even more pertinent a fact, as re-:
ards the ultimate fate* of the submarine, was that the
ell disappeared immediately after the hit was made,
e captain stated that a shell always ricochets in thej
ater and can be seen again unless it finds the mark.
! 1 was seen on the water after the submarine disap
■ared. The Mongolia was going at full speed and
as a long distance away when the spray and foam
hsided. but from the bridge the officers observed
e spot through their glasses and they are confident the
Iimar.ne was sunk.
Rios Mild*
»great liner
TYw
i tain
*1 about to ;* » t
n> k the i
i British water» «
m April 1
irM th«-ro v .,
tel.
at th«.* U-boat
1 ■
Sighted Dead Ahead.
" Peri-; 'as «lighted dead
*h( 1 on Um- list afternoon of the*
a ' {f ' Th< ij*tJiiu gave the order
f il sjiffi] ahead with the inten
1 "f rammln« the submarine. The
« ! I tew min
s ,ater reappeared on the Bhlp'3
•elside The gunners fired, hitting
Perlauope s-inurely and throwing
» fountain of water.
Tribute to Gunners.
Hptaln In paid a high tribute to
gunners and to the manner In
1 I they were handled by their of
j'or five d,i s and nights," he said,
nadnt had mv clothes off and we
hi* r.,t o 0 f lookout» on duty
the time U was 5:20 o'clock in the
Z n,J ' )n of Ul * nineteenth that w-e
1 , l . h - h ' il,,l,arinp ' The officer
imandlng th»* gunners was with me
»e bridge where, in fact, we had
' ™ 08t ,,f tl,c time throughout the
Sight the U-Boat.
M-m? »V 3 haze ov «r % the eea at
j fi e * ,iif l Jtmt taken a sound
' e * r ' Retting near shallow'
and we were looking at the
We' * n f ' rst mate cried:
'Tb" t . B - A i S "* ,mar ' ne Port bow.'
in fi , , rn # nne was c,ose to us, too
, 8uh ® ot , )r her Purposes, and she
e *' s asaln In order to
°'ng us" * better P° alt lon for tor
® an Trained on Sub.
- >»wViL l ' rlacope 80 down and
rM ,hl " 1 Wi4ter - 1 Quickly or
, '»rhoara' l änj' T* " heel PU " "
th ^ Shli, ' 8 8wun * the nose
^marine i , ,'''' the !, P° t "'here the
•*, „V. ad '*•» **n. We were
" — *peed ahead and two
■'age Three.)
HANKS COURT AND JURY
AS HE'S SENT TO PRISON
f Ä mps 2 n ' Found Guilty
Gets Term
*• «■
S&ter last » ° U , nd * ul| ty of man
ration on th. nm * afler * • hort
■»U morn in« 1 * l ' art of the
V. Uwyer^, Bentenc *d by Judge
ri »or mor> not less than two
prison at « *" five »'ears in the
r ' he , ta 'Po, ltlon ha f rd S( . la t bor Previous
~ J P»rman „ * t,Unc *. Attorney
?* y A - J V. iÎ 10 ' along wUh A t
' mi * ot > at the?.??"' repre ' M ' nt *d
tri al. made a abort
CLARK BITTER
IN OPPOSITION
TO THE DRAFT
Speaker of House Says Mis
sourians Must Have Chance
to Volunteer.
Washington, April 25.—Opposition
to the selective draft reached its
climax In the house today when
Speaker Clark took the floor to cham
pion the volunteer army amendment.
Deploring that he could not stand
by the president, whom he unre
servedly declared wrong on the ques
tion, the speaker pleaded that young
men be given an opportunity to offer
their services voluntarily.
"1 protest," he shouted, ''against
having the slur of being a conscript
placed upon the men of Missouri. Bo
far as Missourians are concerned,
there Is precious little difference be
tween a conscript and a convict."
Speaker Clark commended the con
gressmen w'ho have stood by the vol
unteer plan, declaring that the vol
unteers have done most of the na
tion's fighting.
Many to Speak.
Advocates of selective conscription
without the volunteer amendment
claim a majority of 60 or 70 in the
house. House leaders hoped to reach
a vote by Friday, but this appeared
by no means certain, since more than
60 members still were to be heard.
*Jn the senate a similar situation ex
isted. Many' senators wanted to ex
press their views on the bill before
consenting to a vote and leaders dis
like to resort to the new rule under
(Continued on Page Three.)
address in which he asked the court
to exercise leniency. He said that
neither he nor his client had a word
of criticism to offer as to the verdict
of the Jury or the manner in w hich the
trial was conducted. Mr. Furman said
that the jury had recommended
leniency and the defendant had de
cided in view of that fact to throw
hiznself on the mercy of the court.
There would be no appeal and Thomp
son was willing to take whatever
punishment the court saw fit to pro
nounce and was anxious to commence
serving the term of his imprisonment
without delay. Attorney Furman said
that he thought that the court must
have been impressed wlt& the standing
of the men who took the witness stand
(Continued on Page Sixteen.)
IT
HIER COURSE
TORERO SPUN
Note to Berlin Says Spain
Must Defend Herself if
She is to Live.
RUTHLESS CAMPAIGN OF
U-BOATS IS UNBEARABLE
Former Premier Resigned. Con
vinced That Spain Should
Declare for War.
Amsterdam, April 25.—The text of 1
Spain's note to Germany, as given in
a Berlin dispatch, which convayed a
grave warning that the end of Spanish
patience is in sight, also contains a
suggestion that a cris s may be averted
through negotiation. The note said in
part: "All the recent attempts of the
Spanish government, undertaken with
tho intention of safeguarding its sea <
traffic and the lives of its sailors, have
failed in the face of the Imperturbable
resolution of the imperial government
to employ unusual and violent war
measures."
The note then complains of the series
of restrictions Germany has imposed
on Hpanish shipping and of the sink
ing of Spanish ships without warning.
It declares that these methods render
the economic existence of Kpaln almost
impossible* The note continues:
Germany's Iniçratitude.
"All these prove that German inten
tions neither aim at acknowledging oar
rights nor take Into account, us they
should, the requests of a country whose
friendship until today was unabated
and whose neutrality was preserved
without wavering.
Must Defend Spain.
' if the Imperial government persists
In declaring that It adhere« to Its de
termination in order to defend Itself,
It must not be astonished if Hpain, for
the same reason, must emphasize her
( Continu
I on Page Eleven.)
AFTER SCULP OF
Chancellor is Accused of Sym
pathy With Socialist
Peace Plans.
Copenhagen, April 25 (via London).
—The movement for the overthrow of
Chancellor von Bethmann-Hollweg,
halted for a time by the adoption of
ruthless submarine warfare, is again
becoming evident In Germany The
agitation is attended by Internal dif
ficulties, talk of possible peace term9
and food troubles
The pan-German, conservative and
national liberal organs are today
sharply campaigning against the so
cialist peace program and take the
chancellor severely to task for not dis
associating himself and administra
tion from Schiedemann and his propa
ganda.
The conservative Deutsche Tages
Zeitung demands a strong hand at the
helm, W'hich alone. It says, can save
(Continued on Tage Eight )
300 VILLISTIS KILLED
IN BATTLE IT CARMEN
Outlaw's Principal Force
feated and its Com
mander Slain.
De
Juarez. Mex., April 25. — Carranza
forces in command of General Eduardo
Hernandez met and defeated the prin
cipal command of Francisco Villa at
Carmen, between San Buenoventura
and Moctezuma, yesterday morning,
according to the official report of the
t»attle received here today from Gen.
Francisco Murguia, commander in
chief of the division of the northeast.
Gen. Manuel Ochoa, one of Villa's
commanders, was killed in the fighting
at Carmen. His body was found.
Three hundred Villa troops were killed
and wounded, the official report said
Frenc^i Village of Moncby NVill Go D own
in Histo ry As the War's Bloodiest Spot
1
<
WARRANT FOR $200,000.000 TURNED
OVER TO BR ITISH AMBA SSADOR TODAY
It Represents the First Loan by United States to the Allies Great Brit
ain Is Said to Be Spe nding $8,000,000 a D ay in the United States.
Washington, April 25.—Secretary McAdoo today handed the British ambassador
a treasury warrant for $200,000,000, the first loan made to any entente government
by the United States under the $7,000,000,000 war finance measure.
Sir Cecil. Spring- It ice, British ambassador, handed to Secretary McAdoo a receipt,
completing the transaction. The amount of the loan was deposited today in the fed
eral reserve banks by banks subscribing to the $250,000,000 issue of treasury certifi
cates of indebtedness due June 30. The $50,000,000 remaining of the issue will be
disposed of in a manner yet to be announced, tireat Britain will save approximately
$3,000,000 annually in interest charges by obtaining the loan from the government
instead of from private institutions, as the government's interest rate will be .'0/,
per cent as compared with a minimum of 5 per cent on a private loan. Great Britain
is spending approximately $8,000,000 a day for foodstuffs and munitions in America.
WILL NOT ASK AMERICA
TO ENTER INTO FORMAL
ALLIANCE WITH ENTENTE
'Balfour Declar-a Allied Gov
: ernments Are Satisfied to
Rely Simply Upon the As
surance of U. S. That it Will.
See the War to the End. j
Washington, April 25.- Arthur
James Balfour, British foreign
'secretary, stated today that the
allied government would not think
of asking this country to depart
from its traditional policies or
enter into any formal alliance
which might prove embarrassing.
"Our confidence in the alliance and
the assuran es of this government."
Mr Balfour said, is not based on
such shallow considerations as arise
from treatl«*». No treaty could in
crease our unbounded confidence that
the United .States, having come Into
the rar, will see it through to the
great end we all hope for."
Mr. lialfour. after his first two days
in the Ameil an capital, consented to
an interview' to express his gratitude
for the warmth of his reception.
No Ordinary Struggle.
"For two and a half years," Mr. Hal
four continued, "people here In this
country have watched the great and
blood-stained drama abroad and with
ea^-h panning month the conviction has
grown that this was no ordinary
struggle involving a few miles of ter
ritory or some small national ambition,
but nothing short of the whole welfare
of mankind "
Such a cause. Mr Balfour said,
could not fail to affect the United
States.
Need America's Full Effort.
"And now. when after all these
months you feel impelled to enter the
struggle. I am certain you will throw
I
j
(Continued on Page Eight )
STORMY SCENE IN THE
GERMAN REICHSTAG
Body is Summarily Adjourned
Until May 2 Soon After
Its Opening.
London, April 25.—Adjournment of
the reichstag until May 2 after a brief
session yesterday is reported in a Cen
tral News dispatch from Amsterdam.
Philip Scheidemann, socialist leader,
expressed regret that the reichstag
should t»e convoked and then ad
journed almost immediately. George
Ledebour. leader of the socialist dem
ocrats. demanded that reich6tag should
meet today for discussion of the food
problem.
"Thousands of workmen." he said,
"have been forced to abandon work
owing to their distre««.**
Herr Ledebour* a words caused an
uproar. Permission to continue his
speech was refused.
French Delegation, Headed by
Joffre and Viviani, Arrives
Safely in Washington and is
Given an Enthusiastic Wel
j come by Great Crowd.
I Washington, April 25.—The
j French commission headed by
General Joffre and former Premier'
Viviani landed safely at the Wash
ington navy yard today soon after )
noon from the president's yacht]
Mayflower.
The reception of the French mission
transcended the usual diplomatic
courtesies. Rousing cheers and hand
' lapping greeted the Frenchmen
Marshal Joffre, hero of the Marne,
was the canter of Interest, although
Kene Viviani, head of the commission,
was warmly received. A« Marshal
Joffre stepped from the Mayflower a
young French officer, already ashore,
kissed his bands.
Highly Honored.
Headed by Secretary Lansing, the
American officials paid the visiting
Frenchmen every honor.
As the Mayflower came to her
wharf marines and sailors kept ba k
all but those directly connected with
the reception ceremonies. Atta< he* of
the French embassy and of the state
department waited, carrying French
and American flags
Marshal Joffre. Minister VivianJ
and the other members of the party
lined the rsll of the Mayflower. With
th«*m were Ambassador Jusa^rand,
Assistant Secretary Roosevelt. Assist
(Contlnusd
Pag* Fight )
SHIPPERS WILE BE HEARD
IN BATE A DVANCE CASES
Commerce Commission Pre
scribes Method of Proce
dure in Hearing.
Washington. April 25—The inter
state commerce commission today pre
scribed the method of procedure in the
15 per cent rate advance cases by per
mining the railroad* to file supple-*
mental tariff* coverin« the tnereaae
Th;» l* in line w.th me ramnnuioa'ii
announcement of a few days ago. The
new tariff will be subject to protest!
suspension, complaint. Investigation
and correction, the commission an- |
nounced, and their filin« is only pre- ;
llminary to detailed consideration of I
the application and does not dispose of
the cases. i
Indications are that the commis»:on
will Boon set date* for hearings at
which the merits of these increase*
will be considered and shippers will be
given an opportunity to state their
views. j
The effective date of the order,
should it be finally approved. Is
chanced from June to July L
USE OF UK
TRACT GEFEREO
State Accepts Use of Land to
Raise Crop for Public
Institutions.
'Helena, April 25 -The Anaconda
r, 'W*r Mining <om|.agy ha. rna.de >),«•
frtate >f Montana i • of tl e if
2.000 seres or more of lar.d for
Ihe year upon which to raise ail the
xard'-n and other n«.,j,,d ), y
»lat* prison, Innane aij-lum ar.d th*
«uborcutoiila «»riltari ,rn. Irr H r;
-din**
•nda
rh<?
company's dairy and *'<p*-r;m*-r;r farm
in th« Dccrr Lodge valley, offered the
land today to the «»ate board of ex
aminers and th« offer was a' -epted
Warden Frank Conley of the state
prison will do the farming for the
«»ate with convicts and will begin
plowing 1.000 acre« of irrigated land
near Galen at one« Between 1,000 and
1,000 anres of dry lar.d will be planted
to wheat.
WOULD FORCE PORTLAND
SPECULATORS TO SEEL
Holding 80.000 Sacks of Pota
toes in Cold Storage for
Higher Prices.
Portland, Ore.. April 25.—Eighty
thousand sacks of potato«*« are being
held In Oregon cold «torag«» ware
house« by speculators waiting for 1
higher price«. d~*iar*d Mayor H R
AI bee in a letter he sent today to
United States District Attorney Clar
ence Ream**», asking what step« can
be tak«*n to force the potatoes onto
the market.
Albee said he ha» started a probe
of conditions In Portland w-arehoi^es
and branded »peculators as unparti
otic because they held the - potatoes
instead of *e!!ifeg them at reasonab.e
prof!'» for food ar.d purchases
EMERGENCY HOSPITAL TOO
EXPENSIVE, MALONEY SAYS
May 0r-eleCt Plans tO CIOSC the
|n«titlitinn anri Talfd Carp nf
institution ana lake tare 01
Emergency Cases by Con
* rar » U/ith flnp nf the I Oral
W ' 1 .. , UI « *. U '
HOSpitdlS fOC the PreS€nt.
- '
Th * clty * m * r ** ac >' hospital, msu
tuted d jrltjg Former Mayor Charles P
Nevtn's a dm ini sprat ion. will be elimi
nated as too espensi-.e by Mayor-elect
tv H. Maloney, according to the «täte
ments he made today. A bi« city ho.
pital. with free wards for all people
Including a maternity department, may
take the place of the hospital now be
in« operated by th* municipality
Emergency cases for the present will
DEIDCOÏERTHE '
CRflIIND FIR IS
EIE CAN REICO
Village Was the Scene of the
Teutons Greatest Coun
ter Attack.
IN CREAT MASSES MEN
MARCHED TO TOT DEATH
Wave Upon Wave Came For
ward, Wavered and Was
Torn Asunder.
SLAUGHTER EVEN GREATER
THAN IN VERDUN ATTACKS
Hurricane of Fire Meets Body
of 4.000 Germans Rush
ing to Attack.
THK W AR SUMMARY.
In pushing tht British offensive
'today General Sir Ejougla» Haig
directed an attack along the three
mile front between the Coejetil
and Scarpe rivers where further
gains have been scored
South of the Arras ba'tlefront
General Ha:g is eating hit by bit
into the German lines between
Cambrai and St. Quentin. More
than 3 000 prisoners have been
taken.
British Fi
From a i
In Fran'
tpond*
The . ... _
Mon' hy le Preux whUh *•* * jt fl e
r. r »i,e« east, of Arras •'•il! ** ta r 1 ..t in
history as one of th«* bloodiest spots
of the world war The fighting - vrth.
east and «outh of this little Artois
liage, ter'-hed upon a high k: oil. has
exceeded in intensity any of the In
dividual struggles of the Komme Ef
forts of the Germans to retake the
.»lag« apparently have subsided on
account of the sheer exhaustion of
their available forest and the British
ad van «- eastward >f Mon hy ort:m.-e
elo» but eure!)
Ground Covered With Dead.
The ground <*row.d Mon b/ as far a«
the eye an rea.h 1« >vered with the
d«-ad. the German atta xera •% tng
employed the.r o.d tactics of attack
ing in mass formation. Letters taken
In tt*e la et t > o daps from German
prisoners written In front of Moaehjr.
say they regard the sit radon as »ores
than It was on the Somme while the
casualties ar* mounting tip as at Ver
dun. In one of the letters the opinion
is expressed that what ha» made the
fight: rg difficult has been th* fact
that the opposing forces hare aot oc
cupied fixed line«, but are scattered
in half built trer. hes on this pajt yt
the front
700 Caught in Death Trap
D- r:r.^ -e German crontsr attack
• ' -î ' Nur* F »r. -. »
1
-- - Ard'ed or. Use e-JOtract »• e-.e
ot ' te loc » 1 >t*a accordiag to Mr.
M » ioD .y,
"The city ha* heen the «oat km«
* ro '« h * lUl «** emer*en:y boapitak -
«:d Mr Maloner this moc^* -Wbee
It *a* started the county »«reed to
pay its share Every one knosrs the
ounty has fallen down on the a«re«
and w jn nothin«. The city
hasn't the money to keep it «oin«. The
cheaper plan will be to make a con
'-r»ct with one of th* local hospitals
'•'* the treatment of emergency case*,
"Later on it may be possible for the
ho bolld a 'sure enough hospital
that will handle all cases, instead of
selecting the patients. -
Mr Maloney stated this mornin«
tConiir..ed on Page ikghc,-

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