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The Butte daily post. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1913-1961, May 24, 1917, Image 3

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053058/1917-05-24/ed-1/seq-3/

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^WSSÄWKfeÄTSSS
leadow Gold Bott«-,
Lb. 45c
tthat more i'oulcl be asked Ilian to
E, down at the request of good
i" d amt delicious butter, a cup or
n roasted coffee with some sauce
K|! 1 Whole meal of itself.
l mH | holler will make a hundred
Lm,.r tilings Rood. This Implies
KînOtV 001 I» BUTTER. Fresh
Euiriied sweet cream, salted just
t ,ht lo >c it that smack of good
so noticeable. Full weight
rinls—delicious chunks of Meadow
(eld--»penal, por pound........«c
"kTkct PARSNIPS
^IK-ei al- tt ll |s ...................^** c
CRISP DILL PICKLES
hood sire and flavors-, dozen----25c
■ FINEST cornstarch
barest and best, 2-lb bag, special lie
imported sardines
j, . naine lender Norway sordines.
|ey-n|!cncr can, special. 3 cans. .50c
Ll'TEYs HARRISON AVENUE
STORE
Ltesl addition to Luteys cash deal
vsleni a triumph for South
lid, patrons. Take your purchases
' along von save the difference.
SEEDED RAISINS
st quality, special, 2 packages
...........................25c
f.INC.ERSNAPS
family barrel, special for.......25c
JUVENILE TOILET SOAP
fral,e hie box, special for.......25c
FINEST CODFISH
thole, special, lb................14c
Lib bricks, special ..............S3c
>d box ...................45c
FANCY eagle blueberries
Jo. 2 can. special, 3 cans for....55e
i HIRE'S ROOT BEER EXTRACT
ugh for 3 gallons to the bottle
.............................20c
Irec.on tvbi.e blackberries
arge cans ................. -20c
>ARI I OR PIE LOGANBERRIE8
20c
VENTY POUNDS SUGAR *1.70
With *10 order.
llTEYS—WHERE CASH COUNTS
MOST
S II. TRADING STAMPS FREE
WITH YOUR PURCHASE
Triable Hets
SOME MEN
*r a perfectly plain SUIT.
|T lie.v want a neat fabric, sensibte
style and perfect fit.
\TTI\f.LY\S
•t ALL the
can please
f spring suits
requirements,
m—every day.
MATTINGLY'S
117 NORTH MAIN
(Hr Mail—Anything Yea Wish)
)r. Homer J. Flinn
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
. SPECIAL ATTENTION TO
itt.NKRKAL AND GEN1TO-URINARY
DISEASES
■ loo-lot Pennsylvania Blk. Phana 848.
esert madness drives*
MINERS TO FATAL DUEL
Yuma, Arlz.—From AJo has come a
n of bloodshed from hatred that
towed close association between men
Idlvergent social views, also due In
■t, perhaps, to the half madness
it sometimes overcomes the lonely
T»rt miners.
Iwn'ng and operating the Yoya
iup of mines. 18 miles southwest of
I; were Albert L. Conley. Robert W.
ilhof. Jay Fredericks, William W1I
•uid John Dach. The last two are
to have been a part of the labor
aient that failed to secure control of
J ' ,n l ' an, P und to have been bitter
I*"" 11 ' Bttltude toward thetr more
-ervatlve partners. A break Is said
H O been precipitated by the action
■ *ch and Wilson In locating for
pnselvea extensions of the ledge on
' 1 Partnership had been work
redericks, a newcomer, tried to
a " Peacemaker, but failed.
ch - u ,s ««Id, started hostilities
ins heaving of a rock and was
JPPed by a leg wound from a bullet
it tru Con,ey - The witnesses say
r Uaon, who had secured a shot
a few minutes later shot Conley
*> l *h the groin.
cut the femoral artery
niade a fatal wound.
fE BUTTE DAILY POST
-POSTS YOU ON THE NEWS
Superfluous Hair, Roots
and All, Quickly Go!
Ahnolut*!)' Now How« Method)
, e _ . flr8t * n 11 hundred years
Niei.ti.u effect *ve method of removing
KJ Th halry k ro wths has been discov
It new Phelactlne process does
aiiv * y tÄlce °® hair-ends; it ac
ht» n,, r * mov ®* Uia roots! It does this
harmlessly. It does not
> thing like the depilatory, elec
wl° r ° ther method * Phelactlne la
non-poisonous, non -Irritât -
f'* 1 * «tick of It from your drug
v . t ? Uow th e simple Instructions, and
, ■Ätlsfaction of seeing the root«
Tu ." rem °ved at last. If not per
. "«tisfted the purcl.ase price will be
'■ta to you,
TURN nil OVER
TO POLICE CHIEF
California Supreme Court Or
ders Chief Witness in the
Mooney Trial Held.
Ran Francisco. May 24.—Frank C.
Oxman, leading witness in the mur
der trial of Thomas J. Mooney, was
discharged from the custody of the
sheriff and remanded to the custody
of the chief of police by order of the
state supreme court here today.
Oxman was held In custody of the
sheriff to answer in the superior court
on charge of attempted subornation of
perjury. While preliminary hearings
were going on, his counsel appealed to
the appellate court for a writ
habeas corpus. This, the supreme
court held today, properly constituted
stay of proceedings, and further ac
tion in the preliminary proceedings
therefore wns improper.
Action of the court, which was
unanimous, placed Oxman exactly
where he was when a warrant was
first sworn out. The case, under legal
procedure, now will go back to the
police court of Judge Matthew Brady,
as If there had been no preliminary
hearing.
Oxman'« counsel hastened to police
headquarters to give bail.
VESSELS IN WAR ZONE
TO USE SMOKE BOMBS
Ne
York, May 24.—Smoke bombs,
designed to protect merchant vessels
from submarine attacks, are now be
ing used on vessels passing through
the war zone, according to Information
brought to an American port today
a French ship. The bombs are thrown
by hand and on striking the water
ignite and throw out a dense cloud of
black vapor which hangs low over the
water like fog, screening the move
ments of a vessel in danger of attack
UNDERTAKERS.
TORELLI- Funeral services for Paul
Torelli will take place from the resi
dence of A. Francis Coni, 80 Main street,
Meaderville, tomorrow (Friday) at 9
o'clock, thence to Holy Savior church,
where high mass will be celebrated for
the repose of his soul at 9:30. Inter
ment in Holy ('.ross cemetery.
HORTON - The remains of James
Horton are at Sherman & Reed's under
taking parlors. Notice of funeral later.
SHERMAN & REED
Undertakers and EmbaI mers
Aetomobtle and Carriers Eqnlpmenl
1S1-135 .Eaat Broadway
Phon*» 57 and 51
SOKOLICH -Anna, wife of Frank
Sokoltch, died this morning at the resi
dence, 1813 South Idaho street, age 54
years. The funeral will be held at
the residence on Monday morning at
an hour which will be announced later,
proceeding to St. Patrick's church,
where mass will be celebrated.
MOORE The remains of Carrie
Moore, who died this morning, age 33
years, are at the Daniels & Bilboa un
dertaking parlors pending instructions
from relatives Funeral announcement
will be made later.
DUNNE—The arrangements for the
funeral of the late Bernard Dunne have
not been comp leted. The remains are
at the Daniels & Bilboa undertaking
parlors. Funeral announcement will
be made later.
DANIELS & BILBOA
Undertakers sad Embslmsrt
Antsmoblls sad Csrrlags Equlpmsal
Phone S88. 403 Sooth Mala St
Rasldsncs Phone S822-J.
Office Always Op«*_
CARTER—The funeral of the late
John C. Carter will be held tomorrow
(Friday) afternoon at White's funeral
chapel at 2, under the auspices of En
terprise lodge I. O. O. F. Interment in
Mountain View cemetery.
SAM R. WHITE
MASSEY—Mrs. Mary Jane Massey,
aged 61 years, widow of the late James
Massey, died early this morning. The
remains are at the residence of her
daughter. Mrs. Florence Bennett. 930
California avenue, where the funeral
will take place at a time to be an
nounced In later papers.
JOSEPH RICHARDS, I™
Fanerai Directors and Embalmora
Warrington Richard« Pres, and Mr
I*-lf Sooth Montana St
Phone l#7 _
McNALLY—The funeral of the late
Michael McNally will take place Sat
urday mornlnn at Waleh'e undertak
ing parlors at 0 o'clock, proceeding to
tho Sacred Heart church, where high
mais will be celebrated at 9:30 o'clock.
Interment In Holy Croea cemetery. Au
tomobiles.
M. J. WALSH
Fanoral Director and Eaahalaae
121 Eaat Park It
Phono M_
LARRY DUGGAN
Reliable Undertaker and Embala
*21 North Mala Street
Bell Phono 77*
WITH PATRIOTIC FERVOR
VETERANS OPEN' SESSIONS
!
(Continued from Page One.)
he graduated from school to the time
he was admitted to practice law and
finally to the time he was elected chief
executive. But his proudest moment,
declared the mayor, was in extending
welcome to the Montana veterans to
Butte. "Every citizen of Butte stands
behind this welcome," declared the
mayor. "I want to say to you veter
ans of the Q. A. R., your wives and
sons, that we are glad you are here
and I hope and trust that every hour
you spend In the city will he one of
pleasure..
On the Brink.
Our nation stands on the greatest
brink In Its history. The history of
this war will not be written behind
the flag of Great Britain. Nor will
It he written behind the flags of
Franco or Belgium. But it will he
written behind the flag we all adore—
the Stars and Stripes."
Long and repeated cheering greeted
the words of the mayor. When It
finally died down sufficiently for him
to continue, the city's chief executive
declared: "The most glorious news of
all will be what the American soldier
will do in this war." The mayor con
cluded with the prediction that after
the war Imperialism and Prusslasni
will be a dead Issue, never to revive.
National Relief Corps Officer.
After Department Commander Reiche
responded with a short speech in
which he voiced the sentiments of
Mayor Maloney, he introduced Mrs.
Ida K. Martin of Minneapolis, national
president of the Woman's Relief Corps.
Mrs Martin, w'ho has the distinction
of being the first national officer to
attend a local G. A. R. encampment,
brought the greetings of the entire
organization composed of nearly 170,
»00 members. She also brought the
greetings of the commander In chief
of the G. A. R. rank, whom she re
cently conferred with In the east. She
complimented the G. A. R. In having
such a grand order In the Woman
Relief Corps. Reviewing the work of
the women, Mrs. Martin declared that
the G. A. R. was formed In Decatur,
111., in 1866. The organization struggled
along for 15 years. Something was
needed, declared Mrs. Martin. Finally
in Denver in 1883 the National Wom
an's Relief Corps was formed as an
auxiliary of the G. A. R.
From that time the relief corps has
prospered. As the name implies. Mrs
Martin declared, relief is the first con
sideration—not charity. In the 31
years of Its existence the corps has ex
pended nearly $5,000,000 in relief work.
In spite of the enormous amount of
money, Mrs. Martin declared it is a
low rate of interest which Is owing
to the veterans of the G. A. R.
Abreast of the Times.
Mrs. Martin continued that the W.
R. C. has kept abreast of the times,
having been affiliated with the Red
Cross since 1900. Mrs. Martin called
attention to the fact that while the
O. A. R. is the first love of the relief
corps, its work extends to the needy
in every line She added that the
corps stands ready now, as it has at
all times, and will unflinchingly stand
by the men who now go to the front
and do their part in this great war.
Mrs. Martin concluded by declaring
that at present the people of the
United States are greatly Interested in
foreign-speaking people. "I refer to
four classes," she said. "First, those
found here; second, those brought
here; third, tfïose invited here, and,
fourth, those who belong here. I wish
to speak of the third class principally.
1 There are hundreds of thousands com
| ing here annually. When they reach
j our shores th^t are all strange. There
I fore it Is our duty as a patriotic or
I ganizatlon to teach them about our in
stitutions In which we take so much
pride- It Is our duty to instill into
j them the patriotic spirit of '61."
After the cheering which followed
; Mrs. Estella Worth of Butte, on be
half of the Woman's Relief Corps, pre
sented Mrs. Martin with a huge
bouquet of flowers.
Ladies of the O. A. R.
Mrs. Martha White of Hamilton, de
partment president of the Ladies of the
G. A. R., followed. She declared that
to become a member of the organiza
tion one must be a blood relative of a
soldier. Mrs. White declared that she
was glad to hall from' » >ecatur, 111., tho
birthplace of the G. A. R., and pic
tured the benevolent work of the or
ganization by telling of the recent
burial of a confederate soldier by the
men who wear the bronze button of
the G. A. R.
Sons of Veterans.
W. C. Crum of Helena, division com
mander of thi Sons of Veterans, was
given an ovation when, with a num
ber of Sons, he was called to the plat
form by Oo»onel Reiche. Round after
round of applause followed the singing
of "The Old Hag Never Touched the
Ground." In a speech Commander
Crum urged the aid of the G. A. R.
and the ladies In locating a camp of
Sons of Vetetans in every city and
town in Montana. Without their aid
this could not be accomplished, he de
clared.
A patriotic oration, entitled "The
Man Without a Country," by Michael
Harrington, was roundly cheered.
A decided hit of the encampment is
being made by the Boy Scouts. Not
only last night when the veterans
gathered at the hotels, but today a
band of 60 voungsters clad In regula
tion khaki offered assistance. The
boys are divided into four troops.
TrooD 1 was on duty last night and to
day. Troop 8 will take up the work
tomorrow, while on Saturday troops
2 and 4 will act. During tomorrow's
parade the scouts will act as orderlies
and couriers.
Tonight'« Program.
Tonight's patriotic entertainment in
the Auditorium will begin at 8 o'clock.
The program follows:
Bugle call assembly.
Medley, "Songs of Uncle Sam" (Hos
mer) ; A. C. M. band.
Remarks. Joseph R. Corby, chairman.
Munie, "American Patriotic Airs,"
Grade School ofehestra, under direc
tion of Miss Bennett.
Reading, selection, Miss Helena
Daly.
Solo, selection, Misé Marguerite Da
vis; acompanlst, Miss Ivey.
Reading, selected. Miss Helen Little.
Solo, "I'll Stick to Uncle Sammy,"
Miss Fay Lloyd.
Address, Judge Bourquin.
Flag salute and song. Sixty Children
of Grade Schools under direction of
Miss Bennett
Violin duet, Rowland Stanley and
Max Mason; harp accompanist, John
Burkland.
Address, Hon. W. B. Rodgers.
Music, Stevens Glee club.
Essay on patriotism and presentation
of Loyalty Pin, on behalf of depart
ment W. R. C.; presentation by Ruth
A. Burton.
Presentation of Lincoln's picture to
Washington junior high school, on be
half of department L. of O. A R. ; pre
sentation by Mrs. Susie Stillenger; ac
ceptance by Prof. L. H. King.
Presentation of flag to Lincoln camp
No. 5, Sons of Veterans, on behalf of
department W. R. C.; presentation by
Mrs. Ida Davies, department patriotic
instructor; acceptance by Guy L. Tyler,
commander Camp No. 5.
Closing song, "Star Spangled Ban
ner," audience.
Friday Morning.
9 to 12—Executive sessions of va
rious organizations.
Friday Afternoon.
2—Parade.
Marshal—Capt. D. Gay Stivers.
Aids—Maj. C. J. Sargent, Second
Montana infantry; Capt. O. S. Sperry,
Second Montana infantry; Gen. G. I.
Reiche, Grand Army of the Republic;
Ed Morrissey, Spanish War Veterans;
Nels W. Pearson, Spanish War Vet
erans; Charles Henriksen, Spanish
War Veterans; Maj. Guy L. Tyler.
.Sons of Veterans; Rev. G. W Thomas.
Boy Scouts; Mrs. Mary J. Wright.
Woman's Relief corps; Mrs. Georgia
McPherson, Ladies of the Grand Army
of the Republic.
Chief of police, platoons of police,
Sergeant Walter Morrison.
Anaconda Copper Mines hand.
The colors.
Detachment of First battalion Sec
ond Montana infantry, In command of
Lieut. A. G. Swaney, battalion adju
tant, Second Montana Infantry
Grand Army of the Republic.
Montana State band.
Spanish War Veterans.
Butte City band.
Sons of Veterans.
Fife and Drum corps.
School children.
The-parade will form Friday at 1:30
p. m. on West Granite street, botweei
Main and Montana. The parade wil!
start at 2 p. m. from the courthouse;
Granite to Montana; south or
to Park? east on Park tf
j west o
* Montai
1 " y° m l n k; north on Wyoming to
1 Broadway ; west on Broadway to Main;
noï *th on Main to Granite: west on
| ° ran,t< * to courthouse, where it will
disband,
! mittees.
OFFICERS ARE ELECTED
BY SONS OF VETERANS
W. C. Crum of Helena Chosen
Commander—Guy Tyler is
Vice President.
W. C. Crum of Helena was elected
commander of the Sons of Veterans for
the states of Montama and Idaho late
this afternoon Guy L. Tyler of Butte
was chosen senior vice president. The
meeting recessed at 3 o'clock without
electing further officers. The after
noon's session consisted mostly of rou
tine work. Including reports of com
commltt«« from the Wom
an's Relief Corps extended greetings
to the Rons of Veterans and presented
a beautiful bouquet to the newly elect
ed commander.
SPANISH VETERANS
LATE IN STARTING
Commander States the Regular
Business Session Will Be
Held Tomorrow.
The afternoon session of the United
Spanish War Veterans was not begun
until late and consisted mainly of re
ports of committees and the appoint
ment of new ones by Commander L.
L. Lee.
The credential committee, consisting
of Mr. Moran of Butte, C. V. Grundy
of Missoula and J. G. Flannery, sub
mitted a report. Commander Lee
stated that the regular business ses
sions would probably not get under
way until tomorrow morning.
NATIONAL PRESIDENT
IN PATRIOTIC ADDRESS
Mrs. Martin Says Work of Re
lief Corps Has Increased
Respect for Flag.
Mrs. Ida Kane Martin of Minneapo
lis, national president of the Women's
Relief Corps, addressed the afternoon
session of the organization. She stated
that the patriotic spirit of the south
was being stimulated day by day and
it was her belief that the north and
south would be more firmly cemented !
after the present war. She added that
the work of the Women's Relief Corps
in the south had increased respect for
the Stars and Stripes. She praised
the corps because of the part It Is
playing In the present public crisis.
Mrs. Martin was conducted to the
chair by the color-bearers of the or
ganization and welcomed by Mrs. Mary
Jane Wright president of the Lincoln
corps. A committee consisting of Mrs.
J. Wilson Moore of Missoula, Mrs.
Helen Barry Sturm and Mrs. Margaret
Lemley extended the greetings of the
Women's Relief Corps to the members
of the G. A. R. Several committees
were appointed for the business ses
SWIMMING EVENTS
NT BaTTE HIGH
First Annual Contest Was Held
Yesterday Afternoon at
the Gymnasium.
The first interclass swimming con
test w'us held at the Butte high school
yesterday afternoon at 4 o'clock under
the direction of Physical Instructor
Cook, who declared that the exhibi
tion would do credit to professionals.
Principal Bauce E. Milliktn said that
the exhibition brought forth more In
terclass enthusiasm thun he had ever
seen recorded at the institution. The
classes scored as follows:
Seniors ........................ 52
Sophomores.................... 34 ife
Freshmen ..................... 29
Juniors..... . ................... 27
The Engel silver trophy cup was won
by the senior class, which consisted of
Wesley Reed, Emmet O'Neill, Con
Hayes, Neil Wilson and Lowel Bowen.
The Reed gold medal for the high
est number of points was won by
Rockefeller, who scored 28 out of the
34Vj won by his class. The second
prize, the Gillis silver medal, went to
Con Hayes, with a total of 17 points.
The judges of the diving contests were
Arvid Johnson and C. V. Munsey, and
for the other races. Coach Bierman,
A. Bchauss and Homer Bradford.
Mr. ('00k officiated os starter.
sion and the meeting recessed late in
the afternoon before taking up the
routine business.
PROMINENT FIGURES AT
ENCAMPMENT TODAY
Charles Warren Has Not Missed
a Meeting—Extend Greet
ings to Visitors.
Among the prominent figures at the
encampment today are Gen. Charles
Warren, who has never missed a state
encampment of the organization
Simon Hauswirth, listed for the next
department commander; Col. E. S.
Paxson of M'ssoula. artist and old
timer, who is chaplain of the Spanish
War Veterans, and Tat Conlan, a con
federate veteran. The local boys were
busy all day meeting the new arrivals
and extending the greetings of the city
und what is said to be the w'nrmest
welcome that was ever extended to a
state encampment.
In fact the local members of Lincoln
corps were busy all day exchanging
courtesies with the viators and con
ducting them to their rooms in hotels
and private houses. Headed by Gen
eral Warren and Mr. Hauswirth, the
local committee omitted nothing that
would add to the comfort and conven
ience of the soldiers of the Republic.
They W'ere ably assisted by the ladies,
headed by Mrs. Clara O'Connor Daly,
Mrs. Estelle Worth and Mrs. Della
Ptets and tho Boy Scouts, under the
direction of Rev. G. W. Thomas.
G A. R. AND W R. C. HOLD
SERVICES FOR DEPARTED
The Veterans Also Name Com
mittees to Extend a
Welcome.
Memorial services for departed
members were held at a joint session
of the G. A. R. and Ladies of the
G. A. R. at the courthouse this after
noon. The services were held in Judge
Lynch's court room.
The G. A. R. named the following
committees:
Welcome to the W. R. C., George H.
Taylor.
Welcome to the Ladies of the G. A.
R.. William Coleman.
Welcome to the Rons of Veterans,
Colonel Hunt.
Welcome to Spanish War Veterans,
Charles Shoemaker.
Greetings to Sons of Veterans, Z.
Buche« nan, J. Marchiose, Charles Blel
enburg.
Greetings to Woman's Relief Corps,
James R. Goss and C. H. Cobb.
Greetings to ladles of the G. A. R.,
William Coleman, John Deenan and D.
Brennan.
Greetings to Spanish War Veterans.
E. L. Barnes, James M. Sligh and
Charles West.
Guy L. Tyler, newly-elected senior
vice president of the Sons of Veterans,
extended the greetings of that organi
zation to the members of the G. A. R.
He stated that the main object of the
organization was to perpetuate the
history of the veterans and the work
they had done.
SMALL COINS DISAPPEAR
FROM CIRCULATION
I
I
I
;
1
!
j
|
Berue, May .2.—German papers re
port a vexatious and almost mysteri
ous disappearance of small coins, mak
ing it constantly necessary to issue
new provisional iron money which
must be "cashed In" after the war.
The government, since 1916, has
coined and Issued 10.603.000 marks
worth of silver, 50 pfennig pieces, most
of which have disappeared from sight
almost as fast as put out. In addition
it has put out 116.000,000 10-pfennlg
pieces and about as many 6-pfennig
pieces made of iron, and even these
are disappearing. Business firms are
known to have in some cases as much
as 70,000 marks worth of iron money.
The situation Is to be relieved, it is
reported, by a huge Issue of "bons" for
60 pfennigs apiece, which will be put
out by individual municipalities and
taken up after the war.
The shortage of small money and its
retirement from circulation and Into
countless stockings have been under
way for more than two years. It be
gan originally in the occupied portions
of France, then spread to similar dis
tricts In Russia. Its first result was
the issue of municipal paper money all
over northern France, and the Issue of
military orders forbidding the natives
to accept either French or German
money but to accept only town "bons."
Children Cry for Fletcher 7 »
•W.> x'..\VA'lvNsV\V
CAST0RIA
*-»N> •vV.WV.W'.' n \ V
r f ho KiacI Yot, Have AJ .7t.yc Liciujht lias ;>orne the nlgtia
5-1 Fiat; been mode under hla
turc of Chas II Fletcher, and
v« r 90 years. Allow no one
UouutcrfeltH, Imitations and
personal supervision for over 30 years,
lo deccivo you l:t this.
"Just-as-good" uro l>ut experiments, out! endanger tho
health of Children—experience ag ains t experiment.
What Is CASTORSA
rla Is n harmless substitute for Castor OU, Pi
Custorl
gorlc, I>rop; and fioo-.hlng Syrups.
Opium. Morphine nor other narci
more that, thirty years It has been in oonstai-t use for tho
aro
. . It contains neither
Morphine nor other narcotic substance. For
relief of Constipation, Flatulency, Wind Colie and
Diarrhoea; .nlluyliig Fovcrl illness arising therefrom,
and by regelating the Stomach and Dowels, aids the as
similation of Food ; u.îvlng healthy and natural sleep.
The Children's Puuacc»- The Mother's Friend,
YLfc Kind You Have Always Bought
1 Bears the Signature of
Bn Uiue For Over 30 Years
THE CWTWn COMPANY, NEW VOM CHT. _
THE ITALIANS GAIN A
SWEEPING VICTflflY
(Continued ft-om Page On«.)
one of their periodical status of com
parative quiet. The French front is
the liveliest, the Germans reacting
there after the recent French suc
cesses. A counter-attack on the Vau
clerc plateau last night was repulsed
Immediately with heavy losses to the
Germans.
The Paris w'ar office announces that
so far In May 8,600 unwounded Ger
mans have been captured In the field
of the French offensive between Bois
sons and Auberive.
ITALIAN FORCES TAKE
BIG SECTION OF LINE
OF AUSTRIAN DEFENSE
Ro
Ma
24
(via fjondon).—The
Italian forces yesterday broke through
the Austro-Hungarian lines from Cas
tagnavizza to the sea. taking more
than 9,000 prisoners, says the official
statement issued today by the Italian
war department.
The Italian war office announced
that Italian forces had occupied part
of the area south of the Castagnavlzza
Boscomalo road, had passed Boscomalo
and had captured the town of Jamiano
and strong forts east of Pletrarossa
and Bagnl.
The Italian official report says the
Austro-Hungarians at first were sur
prised and nonplussed. Towards eve
ning they launched counter-attacks
but were repulsed.
Italian airplanes numbering 130
dropped 10 tons of bombs on the Aus
tro-Hungarians.
The British batteries co-operated
with the Italians.
GAS ATTACK TURNS
OUT TO BE BOOMERANG
Petrograd, May 24 (via London).—
The official report Issued today says:
"On Tuesday the enemy released a
ave of asphyxiating gas east of Ll
pltza Dolna, north of Galitch, but
thanks to a change in wind the gas
as diverted In the direction of the
enemy trenches.''
GERMAN SHIPS ARE
ACTIVE IN BALTIC
London, May 24.—Pronounced Ger
man naval activity in the Baltic on
Tuesday !s reported in a Central News
dispatch from Copenhagen. Yesterday
violent cannonade lasting through
out the night was heard by persons
living along the shore. Houses on
southern Danish Islands shook from
the concussions.
ITALIANS KEEP UP
AGGRESSIVE ACTION
Ieondon, May 24.—The Italian offen
sive has entered Into Its second stage
with new and Important gains between
Gerzla and the ses. said Maj. Gen. F.
B. Maurice to the associated press to
day. The first day of the new drive
has resulted In the capture of more
than 3.000 nrlsoners.
SEBASTOPOL GARRISON
WANTS REAL ACTION
Sebastopol, May 54 (via London).—
The officers and men of the local gar
rison have unanimously requested that
they be sent to the Riga front to fight
the Germans Their action Is In re
sponse to the speech of Minister of
War Kerensky and the appeal of the
council of soldiers and workmen's
delegates
8,600 PRISONERS
TAKEN BY FRENCH
Paris. May 24.—German counter at
tacks near the Vauclerc plateau were
repulsed last night with heavy losses,
according to an official statement Is
sued this morning. Pines Msv 1 the
French have taken 8.600 prisoners In
this district.
The statement follows:
"On the Ve u clerc plateau at ft : 30
o'clock last night an attack hv the
Germans made after a violent bom-'
bardment. was checked tmmedhitefv.
The Germans were driven tack to the
Ill TTK
MOTOR TRUCK
CO.—
(ieneral
auto and truck
repair
ing l'
rompt aervlee. All work
guaranteed. 422 Hopkina
street.
»
Phone 909.
trenches ia
hence they crime,
after suf
fering heavy hisses. Prisoners taken
in this region !n the operations of May
22 belong to six regiments from four
different divisions. Since May 1 8,800
unwounded Germans have been cap
tured by our troops between Boissons
and Auberive.
"In the Champagne there was rather
active artillery fighting on the Moron
v il Hers range On the remainder of
the front patrol encounters and In
termittent artillery fighting occurred."
COMPARATIVE CALM
ON BRITISH FRONT
London. May
24 —
"We secured a
few prisoners du
ring
the night as
tho
result of re-trol
en *<
ounters east
of
Leverguler." say
s today's war office
report on opt
erati.
uis along
tho
Franco-Belgian
front
"Nothing
else
sting occurred."
REVIVAL OF ACTIVITY
ON RUSSIAN FRONT
Berlin, May 24 (via London).—Re
viving activity at several points on the
Russian front Is announced by army
headquarters today, the Riga district
near the Baltic coast being particu
larly mentioned.
FAMOUS PUGILIST DIES
EDOM PNEUMONIA ATTACK
(Continued from Pag* One.)
slipped away
worked his
stoker.
Soon after his arrival here, how
ever. he became the victim of avarici
ous managers and it wan not long be
fore he was held up to ridicule and
acorn.
Dubbed a Slacker.
He became Involved in trouble with
the boxing commissions of New York
and Wisconsin because of conflicting
contracts with different boxers Then
Governor Whitman of New York
dubbed him a "slacker" and refused to
allow him to appear In the ring in
the state. This action was followed
by similar orders by the governors of
Wisconsin, New Orleans. Ohio and
other states where the game flour
ishes. The result was that he was not
able to get a single match in this
country. He then declared his Inten
tions to become a citizen of the United
States and enlisted in the aviation
corps.
A week ago it was announced that
he was suffering from pneumonia and
had been taken to a hospital. His
manager at that time stated that his
boxing days were over.
Darcy was born at Woodville. N S.
W.. Australia. Oct. 28. 1895. His fight
ing weight was between 158 and 160
pounds and he was 5 feet 6 inches
high He began boxing In amateur
tournisments in 1911, but his work was
of such high class that he soon Joined
the professional ranks. Like Fitzsim
mons, he was a blacksmith by trade
and was credited with having a punch
In either fist which was only excelled
by those of the Lanky Bob. Most of
his battles were won by the knockout
route, among his victims being such
well known pugilists as Eddie Mo
Gooiity t twice), Jimmy Clabby
(twice), George Chip snd others.
During hi* entire career in the ring he
lost but three bouts. One was a 20
n und affair with Bob Whitelaw at
New Castle soon after he entered the
game Whitelaw was given the de
cision. The other two bouts were both
lost on fouls, which Darcy declared
after the mills were entirely uninten
tional. They were to Fritz Holland
after 18 rounds of milling and Jeff
Smith after two rounds.
j
___ ___— —
, THE POST FOR THE NEWS
A daughter was horn this morning to
Mr. and Mrs. Gustan Gustasson at
their home. 2015 Howard avenue.
Mother and babe are doing nicely.

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