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The Butte daily post. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1913-1961, May 28, 1917, Image 1

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WEATHER FORECAST
nr'TTE_Tonight: Unsettled; shower».
Tomorrow —Unsettled ; cooler.
%^utte JBatlp $oôt.
WEATHER FORECAST
MONTANA-Unsettled weather tonight
and Tuesday, probably showers, warmer
extreme east portion tonight._
VOL. 5, NO. 127.
BUTTE MONTANA. MONDAY. MAY 28, 1917
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
ST OF FOOD
SUPPLY BILLS
les $14,770,000 for Sur
vey of Food Situation
in Country.
SURE GOES THROUGH
ITHOUT RECORD VOTE
Rankin, in First Speech,
as Interested Audience
of Congressmen.
5 hington, May 28—The first
e administration food bills
ng appropriations of ap
•nately $14,770,000 for a
y and stimulation of the food
y passed the house today
ut record vote,
imilar bill is pending in the
RANKIN IN
HER FIRST SPEECH
ihington. May 28—Represent
Rankin of Montana made a
the floor of the house today
«Mentally won her Initial fight,
lucceeded In amending by a
aous vote In the committee of
Vole the food bill bo as to pro
Wt In making the proposed food
the services of women shall be
'insofar as practicable.
must take an intelligent
■^sponsible share In the world's
f we are to see that all the
arc fed all the time," declared
ankin.
endous applause greeted Miss
when she arose to speak and
she concluded. Members poured
cloak rooms and lobbies to
maiden speech of the first
vornan and she had the
audience that has attended any
i the food bill,
ork, such as gathering in
no»' pre\ enting waste, in
activities that we have been
med to seeing women engaged
id Miss Rankin. "And when
activities are so closely related
Is the food question, wom
especially well fitted by their
K and experience to do this
It 1« self-evident that women
ing to fill many positions that
filled by men in the past
Is Is one of the places where
an be used effectively."
I ENVOYS TELL
OF COUNTRY'S NEEDS
jhington. May 28.—"Italy's urgent
eds of railway equipment, coal,
~d steel were laid formally be
merlcan officials today by the
commission.
rnment officiais Indicated that
demands would be met as far
I hie, hut that they would have
considered In conjunction with
orniouN war needs of America
and of the other allies.
IL EXPECTS BERLIN
WAR DECLARATION
Janerlo, May 28. -A Noticia
hat In German circles It Is as
that Germany will declare war
within two or three days,
S, FIRST COMMANDER TO
ET ACTION, IS PROMOTED
I 1
I Chief Commanding U. S. 1
ps in European Waters is
de Vice Admiral. Nearly
.000 Americans Already
Fig hting in Fr ance.
h ngton. May 28.—Rear Admiral
111 charge of American naval
uns in European waters, was
ly appointed today a vice ad
by President Wilson.
on, May 28.—An official state
IsRucd here today says that
* the Americans serving In the
and French armies and the
units ordered to France there
ortly he 100,000 Americana in
statement adds that 8,500 air
"111 be constructed and 6,000
* trained In the United States.
' er contingent of the American
corps arrived In England to
The contingent comprised units
niladelphla and St. Louis.
end of jitneys.
*jne. May 28—All flve-cent fare
biles were ordered off the
Spokane today after word
reived from the secretary of
the automobiles were op
"lthout bonds.
(C .iri lfStl It IT, By John T. MoCutcheon 1
DO VOW PWOrvMSfi- loyally
To PAOTBCT MR AND MINS
WHILE I AM AWAY PROlkCTlNfr
YOU ? *
a
a
loam
j|| '
BATTLING THEIR
WAY TO TRIEST
Their Guns Now Hammering
at Last Great Austrian
Barrier.
VIENNA CLAIMS TH£
ATTACKS REPULSED
The Austrian Statement Tells
of Thousands of Prison
ers Taken.
THE WAR SUMMARY.
Ths Italians have fought their way
forward to within two milas of Duino,
the most formidable barrier between
them and Trieet. The great battle
now enters its eighteenth day without
any sign of an abatement. Vienna re
fuses to concede the Italian victories
but the map telle tha story of General
Cadorna's steady advance.
Duino, at the gates of which the
Italian guns are now hammering,
marks a point at which the Carso
plateau almost touches the sea. Pro
tected by the ocean on the one side.
It Is powerfully defended to the north
by Mount Queroeto, a height of con
siderable magnitude which dominates
the country for many miles around.
At the foot of Mount Querceto, fac
ing west, lies the little town of Me
deazza, and the Italians have smashed
their way to within a few hundred
yards of the village. It is possible
that a lull will occur before they at
tempt the formidable ask of storming
Mount Querceto.
Persistent attempts ace being con
(Continued on Pag« Nln«.)
B&AB ADM. NX/. S. SIMS
He is the first American commander
to get his forces into action in the
European war. Admiral Sims was to
day appointed viejg admiral by Presl
dent Wilson.
25« DEAD, 1,200 INJURED IN SERIES OF
TORNADOES I N MIDD L E WE ST AND SOUTH
Thousands of Houses Wrecked and Immense Area of Growing
Crops Devastated By Storm That Takes Its Toll in Eight States
OLID AND INJURED
Revised figures on dead
and in
jured in the
storm* of
the last
three days in e
ight states
show the
following dead
and injured:
State—
Dead.
Injured.
Illinois .......
...... 92
650
Indiana .......
220
Kansas .......
....... 26
60
Kentucky .....
..... 40
60
Missouri .....
...... 1
12
Tennessee . . .
53
Alabama . . . .
...... 31
100
Arkansas ....
...... 23
62
Total ......
....... 245
1,207
SENATE MAKES A
FURTHER CUT IN
WAR TAX BILL
That Body Takes $15,500,000
Out of the House
Measure.
Washington, May 28.—Involving a
further reduction of the house war
tax bill by $15,500,000 the senate fi
nance committee today decided to ex
empt motion picture films, jewelry
and chewing gum from taxation. A
new confectionery tax was considered.
Instead of the house rates on man
ufacturers' gross sales of athletic
goods, perfumes, cosmetics and pro
prietary medicines, the committee de
cided to keep them as sources of rev
enue, but by stamp taxes instead of
the 5 per cent gross sales tax. The
committee also Is considering a tax
on tonnage of pleasure yachts Instead
of the house tax on their cost. The
changes decided upon today followed
the committee's decision to strike out
the 5 per cent tax on all manufac
turers' sales.
URGE SPUN TO BREAK
WITH TEUTONIC NATIONS
Madrid, May 28 (via Paris).—Reso
lutions adopted at the great mass
meeting in Madrid yesterday in favor
of the entente allies were presented to
the Spanish minister of the Interior
today. The resolutions were to the
effect that "Spain should break dip
lomatic relations with Germany and
should accept all the consequences
from the action which she is com
pelled to adopt for the defense of her
dignity."
Disaster Wrought by the Elements Began on Fri
day in JÇyj isas: Saturday Evening Central Illi
nois \$Sar Storm Swept and City of Mattoon
Was Devastated; Sunday Evening Another
Tornado Took Up Its Course in Southern Illi
nois and Swept Through Three States Into
Alabama.
Tornadoes during the last three days, in eight states of the middle
west and the south, have killed nearly 250 persons, injured more
than 1,200, wrecked thousands of houses and devastated many
thousands of acres of growing crops, according to summaries today.
Latest Tornado Sunday Night.
The latest in the series of tornadoes started late Sunday, ap
parently in the vicinity of Willisville, in southwestern Illinois, swept
southward across the Ohio river into Kentucky, down the Mississippi
into Arkansas and Tennessee, and finally veered eastward toward
Alabama, where the storm apparently spent itself. The dead in the
four southern state* was roughly estimated at one hundred and the
injured at several hundred. »
Twenty-six Killed h Kansas Village.
The destruction began last Friday at Andale, Kan., where 26
people were killed and 60 injured. Late Saturday another twister
struck the rich corn belt of central Illinois, killing 54 persons and
injuring perhaps 500 in Mattoon. At Charleston, 10 miles east of
Mattoon, 37 were killed and more than 150 injured. The property
damage in the two cities is estimated at $3.000,000.
Central Illinois and Indiana Stormswept.
Another destructive storm late Saturday crossed a territory ap
proximately 100 miles north of the center of Illinois, reached into
northern Indiana and caused the lqs* of a dozen lives, the injury of
more than 200 and a heavy property damage. Because of fallen
wires communication into the stricken districts has been difficult.
91 DEAD AND 5,000 ARE
HOMELESS IN MATTOON
Mattoon, 111., May 28.—With 91
known dead, 600 injured and a prop
erty loss estimated at $3.000,000. Mat
toon and Charleston, twin victims of
the tornado which swept central Illi
nois Saturday, today began organizing
relief measures for more than 5,000
homeless persons.
Under supervision of the Red Cross
food stations have been established
and plans made for the burial of the
storm's victims today. Appeals have
been issued for money, and clothing
particularly for women and children.
An appeal for $250,000 to meet the
Immediate needs of the tornado vic
tims was Issued today by the Red
Cross.
Compilation of the first detailed
statistics on the disaster indicated that
Charleston's dead numbered 40 and
Mattoon'8 55. One death was also re
ported from near Springfield. Mo.
103 PERISHED IN
FOUR SOUTHERN STATES
Memphis. Tenn., May 28.—Reports
today from the devastated territory in
the four southern states swept by tor
nadoes yesterday and last nicht placed
(Continued on Pa«« Three)
GERMANS STILE RELY
ONJREJUBMARINES
Berlin Issues a Reply to Lloyd
George's Declaration That
Menace is Solved.
Amsterdam, May 28 (via London).—
The speech of Premier I-loyd George
last week, in which he said German
submarines were being combated suc
cessfully and that England could not
l>e starved by the submarine campaign.
Is characterized as 'only empty
words," In a semi-official German re
ply.
"Facts are lacking," says the reply,
"because our navy has found little
trace of the new methods whereby, ac
cording to the views of the enemy, the
submarine danger can be met. Hith
erto all enemy experts have agreed
that with the present means they are
powerless against the serious dangers
occasioned by submarines. A change
In technical methods cannot be
achieved In a fortnight. We calmly
await Lloyd George's prediction as to
the future."
ENTREATIES TO
RUSSIAN ARMY
TO BATTLE ON
Fighting Commanders Urge
Their Men to Prepare
for the Attack.
ALL CLASSES IN THE
EMPIRE NOW UNITED
Nation Awaits Decision of the
Army as to Future
of Russia.
I
I
Petrograd. May 27 (via London,
May 28).—Virtually all of the diver
gent political factions, all class or
ganizations, councils and even the so
cialist lenders, with the exception of
the Extreme Lefters, today re-echo
the appeal of Minister of War Keren
sky to the troops and applaud the new
order of the day, "Advance!" It re
mains to be seen how the army itself
will receive this final exhortation to
patriotism and the defense of Russia's
newly-won freedom.
C. instant efforts have been made
during the past two months by repre
sentatives not only of the government
but of the soldiers to bring home to
the army that the abandonment of
active warfare would not only mem
treachery to the allies but the inevit
able loss of all that has been gained
In the revolution. It is confidently
believed that this last call, supported
as It is by almost every element of
society, will move the army to a re
alization of the situation. All the
commanders have added their ap
peals to the order of Minister Keren
sky. They all emphasize the neces
sity of not only defending the country
against the enemy but of an immetl*
ate advance to relieve the pressuie
upon the allies which Germany his
been able to exert by transferring the
bulk of her troops from the eastern
to the western front.
What Leaders Say.
General Alexleff says: "Advance to
attack the enemy."
general Brussiloff says: "It is nec
essary to conserve and consolidate
freedom. The soldiers must over
(Continued on Page Three.)
QUICK RECOVERY OF G. A. R.
VETERAN BELIEVED DYING
Col. Fred Hunt, Stricken With j
Paralysis in Theater. Taken
to Hospital Unconscious. To
day He's Smoking and De- j
daring "You Can't Kill an
Old Timer."
Cot. Fred A. Hunt, civil war veteran,
newspaper correspondent and maga
zine writer, prominent Mason and a
man who fought the Indians under
Gen. Nelson A. Miles In the late '70s
from Indian Territory, now Oklahoma,
to Montana, won out In a battle with
death in Hutte today. Stricken with
paralysis while attending a perform
ance at Pant&gea theater, rushed to
Murray s hospital iu a critical condi
FOR LIBERTY LOIN
IS BUTTE'S COIL
Local Bankers Start Energetic
Campaign for Bond
Subscriptions.
NON-TAXABLE FEATURE
MAKES THEM ATTRACTIVE
New Government Issue Equiv
alent to 6i Per Cent
Industrial Bond.
At least a million for the Liberty
Loan from Butte.
This is the goal of local bankers
who started an energetic campaign
today to interest patrons and de
positors in the many advantages
of the new bonds, subscriptions
for which are now being received
not only at the bank« but at the
Butte postoffice as well.
The Liberty loan allotments sug
gested for the various federal reserve
bank districts show that $100,000.000
worth of the bonds have been allotted
to the ninth district, which should sub
scribe for from eight to ten million
dollars worth of the bonds. This
brings Butte's allotment up to more
than a million.
Shows Spirit of Nation.
"Every American who loves Amer
ica's honor should subscribe," say the
bankers, and they point out that the
real success of the loan is to be more
determined by the number of Ameri
cans participating in it than the
amount subscribed. The spirit of the
nation, they declare, is going to be
Judged abroad, especially by our ene
mies. more by the number of men and
womefl who support the bond issue
than by the mere amount of money
subscribed.
''The $2,000,000.000 bond issue of this
year Is named 'The Liberty Loan of
1917,' because It is to be a loan from a
free people to be used in freelnr the
world." said a prominent Butte banker
today In discussing the issue. "It is
the loan of a liberty-loving people to
he devoted to the establishment of
liberty In Europe and on the high seas
Every American who subscribes to the
belief that an American should stand
bv his or her country should subscribe
to the bond Issue."
As to Security.
Bankers point out that Butte has far
more postal savings depositors in pro
(Continued on Page Sixteen.)
FBBÏÏ FOB ARMY
nun form
Recruiting Officers in Butte
Kept on Jump Receiving
Applicants.
Forty men enlisted in the regular
army. 20 In the navy and 2 in the Sec
ond regiment. National guard of the
United States. In Butte today. Re
cruiting officers were kept on the jump
all day receiving applications and ex
amining recruits.
George Tony, a husky Greek, and
John Fmlgh enlisted for service with
the Second Montana and the follow
ing enlisted in the navy: L. Williams,
hospital apprentice; I). MacDonald,
hospital apprentice: V. Denlston. hos
pital apprentice; J. Murphy. third
class tireman; J. R. Jenkins, machin
ists' mate, second class; W. McFar
land. fireman, third class; W. Solberg,
fireman, third class; T. McCarthy,
landsman electrician; J. Crowley, third
class fireman ; P McGrath, apprentice
seaman; Walter E. Dowling, tireman.
third class; S. Porach, tireman, third
class; E. V. Cronnelly, tireman, third
class; T. F. Lee. hospital apprentice,
second class; H. Barron, landsman
(Continued
Tage Fifteen.)
tion. his life despaired of by the ph)
stcians at 5 o'clock this morning, tt
grizzled war veteran was sitting u
tn bed four hours later smoking
cigar This afternoon Colonel Hui
predicted that he will leave the hoi
pltal In time to assist In the decoratic
of graves and the Memorial day sen
Ices Wednesday.
Colonel Hunt, who has been in Moi
tana for the past three months wrt
tng a history of the state's India
fighters, had been stopping at tl
Montana Soldiers' home tn Columb
Falls. He came to Butte to attend tl
G. A. R. encampment. Ijist night 1
attended the theater performance wii
G. I. Reiche, retiring commander
the department of Montana. Towat
the close of the performance the o
(Continued on Pag« Fight)

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