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The Butte daily post. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1913-1961, June 01, 1917, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053058/1917-06-01/ed-1/seq-1/

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WEATHER FORECAST
Œjje Putte 2Battp iPoöt.
WEATHER FORECAST
MONTANA—Partly cloudy tonight and
Saturday, slightly warmer tonight._
L. 5, NO. 131.
BUTTE MONTANA. FRIDAY. JUNE 1. 1917
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
REE AMERICAN SAILING SHIPS FALL PREY TO SUBMARINES
__________________
Are Destroyed by Gunfire; One Is Bombarded Without Warning to Crew
YORK PORT CLOSED SEVERAL HOURS
UBMARINE NET DRAWN; SHIPS HELD UP
WINDJAMMER DIRIGO
F 3,005 TONS LARGEST
OF V ESSELS SE NT DOWN
Mate John Ray of That Ship Was
owned When Boats Were Launched
Under Shell Fire
Crew Put Off Germans Looted the Vessel
Blew Her Up With Bombs—Dirigo's Crew
ded at Plymouth—Men From the Barbara
~ght Ashore at Gibraltar, and Those of the
ces M. Are Safe at Cadiz.
American sailing vessels have been destroyed by
submarines, according to announcements made
the British admiralty. The'crews of all thi'ee
ave been landed. There was one casualty. John
ird mate of the big cargo carrier Dirigo, was
while the crew was taking to the boats. The ad
s statement says the Dirigo was attacked by gun
' out warning.
CEMENTS OF
TISH ADMIRALTY
[Thursday. May 31.—The
"ailing ship Dil i no, 3,005
"n sunk l»y a German sub
er«w ha.s been sanded
ceptinn of John Ray, third
ran drowned when the
A'ere being launched,
ent Issued by the British
says that the Dirigo was
gunfire by a German sub
ich gave no warning. The
subsequently sunk by
it lmd been ransacked
of the submarine. The
urred May 31 and the crew
at Plymouth.
o was attacked at 7 o'clock
rnlng. The weather was
ugh hazy. The men were
fore 9 o'clock. Joseph G.
American consul at Ply
ring for the survivors.
The Barbara.
iralty reports that the
sailing vessel Barbara was
gunfire of a German sub
7 o'clock on the morning
All members of the crew
at Gibraltar.
e Frances M.
rican sailing ship Frances
Page Seven.)
ERNED GERMANS
N TO BE PAROLED
cisco, June 1.—Paroles for
e 200 Germans interned at
Island detention camp here
tnined soon, It was un
today by department of
ente. Bailors from con
_:rman vessels and Germans
American ships are
who have made appllca
arole on advice of United
oritles, who are investi
erst» of each applicant.
MBUS MAIDEN WISHES
0 BECOME A WAR BRIDE
o Mayor W. H. Ma
for a Husband Out of
en Who Will Go to
rom Butte. Will Write
etters.
-be war bride wants a^lius
tte. This was learned this
Mayor W. H. Maloney
~eived a letter from Ger
Haven of Columbus, Ohio,
aven says she is alone In
"d wants to be represented
by a husband. She wants
a fine home for him when
from France.
to do something for my
at the same time for my
Misg De Haven. "I want
p bride, but I want a west
p a husband; one who will
in Prance and distinguish
possible get me a eow
DECLARE THE PROPOSED
INCREASE NOT JUSTIFIED
Western State Railway Com
missions Before Washington
Commerce Board.
Washington, June 1.—Western state
railroad commissioners today pointed
to the interstate commerce commis
sion at its hearings on the applications
of the roads for a general advance of
15 per cent in freight rates, data in
tended to show the effect of the Amer
ican law' on operating expenses of the
carriers. The purpose was to prove
that the proposed increase is not Jus
tified.
W. G. Pow'ell, rate accountant for
the Nebraska railroad commission,
presented figures on several lines north
of the Missouri river.
Protests against the Increase were
filed by representatives of the public
service commissions of Washington
and Oregon and the public utilities
commission of Idaho.
TO ENLIST THE RAITISH
SUBJECTS IN 1MERICI
% New York, June 1.—A campaign to
enlist some of the estimated 800,000
British subjects In this country was
begun today when offices for the "Brit
ish Recruiting Mission" were engaged
here. Actual recruiting will not be
started, how'ever, until Brig. Gen. W.
A. White, head of the mission, outlines
its objects In a statement which is ex
pected on Monday. Whether the mis
sion W'ill establish recruiting stations
in other cities will depend on the suc
cess achieved here.
1
!
"I am alone in the world. My
father fought in the civil war and made
a name for himself. He has been dead
for 10 years. My mother died four
years ago.
"Now, I have a good home and a
nice income. I v ould like to go to
France as a Red Cross nurse, hut I
can't do it. 1 faint at the sight of
blood. I want a husband; one who
will go to war. I prefer western men
because they have the red blood of the
sort the country wants. If you can
get me such a man I will send him to
w'ar. I will write him every day and
when he comes home he will have a
loving wife waiting and comfortable
home.
"I am sending you my address, but
don't publish it in the papers because
my friends would 'kid' me to death.
Tell your single friends of military age
that a pretty girl, 27 years old. who is
comfortably fixed, wöuld like to hear
from them."
The mayor will give further infor
mation to those interested.
FROM HOSPITAL WINDOW
As it is Being Recovered the
Rope Slips and Body'Falls
Two Stories.
Portland, June 1.—rAn interne at a
Portland hospital early today found
the body of C. E. Lingerfunder, said
to be a Boise, Idaho, attorney, hang
ing out of a second story window from
a rope around his neck. The Interne
called for help and in the haste to get
the body inside the rope slipped and
the dead man fell two stories to the
ground.
Dater today the coroner said he was
uncertain whether death resulted from
the hanging or the fall. Lingerfunder
left no reason for his act. He was
about 45 years of age.
BY OFFICIALS FOR
CLOSING THF PORT
No Vessels Permitted to De
part From New York for
Several Hours.
ACTION STARTLES MANY
UNSETTLES THE MARKET
Confidence is Restored When
Authorities Quickly Re
open Waterway.
New York, June 1.—For reasons
which navy yard and customs officials
refused to reveal, the port of New
York was for a good part of the fore
noon closed today to all shipping by
the shutting of the gate in the steel
net closing the harbor, which was
placed in position soon after the sev
erance of diplomatic relations with
Germany. Shortly before noon it was
learned that the order closing the port
had been rescinded, although at that
time the gate was still closed.
Rumors started by the closing of the
harbor found reflection in the stock
and cotton markets. United States
Steel, which led the decline, dropped
from 131*/a to 126^. The losses were,
however, for the most part restored
by noon, when the ban on shipping
was lifted.
The cotton market, which had ad
vanced sharply on the government
crop report, became for a while ner
vous and irregular. The gate was re
opened at 12:20 p. m.
KIDNAPERS Et TO
CLjIM Tfll BOOTY
Springfield, III., Banker Also
Fails to Get Back His Kid
naped Babe.
Springfield, Mo., June 1.—Carrying
$(>,000 In currency and driving alone an
automobile equipped with lights of
peculiar design, J. TI. Keet, a local
banker, kept a lonely vigil last night
through the iryjd-soaked roads ol
Green county, where he had been ad
vised he would be halted and giver
his kidnaped son for the ransom he
carried.
At daylight he returned home, the
kidnaping party having failed to keep
their promise, because several other
motor cars trailed Keet, although h<
requested them not to do so.
Lloyd, the 14-month-old son, wai
stolen from their home here while his
parents were attending a dance at a
local country club.
Mil TI DIW It
HISBIPPWM
Washington, June 1.—Administration
managers in the senate today decided
to let the newspaper censorahip section
of the espionage bill die with the
house vote of yesterday against tt.
The senate conferee» expect to drop
the hard-fought section out entirely
and bring the bill before the senate
for final passage containing only the
undisputed provision«.
REPORTED TO BE ONE OF THE P'5 IN THE PEACE PLAN
IConyrlgbt: 1917: By John T. M.'CuU'hoon. J
]
!
BUTTE BUSINESS HOUSES
WILL PROBABLY SUSPEND
FOR REGISTRATION DAY
Meeting of Merchants Called
for Tonight to Decide on
Tuesday's Policy. Non-Resi
dent Eligibles Flock to the
City Clerk.
PRESIDENT'S PROCLAMATION
WARNS THOSE WHO SEEK TO
EVADE REGISTRATION JUNE 5
Washington, June 1.—President Wilson, in a proclamation is
sued today, warns all persons seeking to avoid registration by
leaving the country, that they expose themselves to prosecution and
military service eventually in spite of their efforts to avoid it. The
president's proclamation says:
"I, Woodrow Wilson, president of the United States of America,
do hereby give warning that all persons subject to registration
* * * who withdraw from the jurisdiction of the United States
for the purpose of evading such registration expose themselves
upon their return to the jurisdiction of the United States to prose
cution for such evasion of registration pursuant to section five of
the act of congress approved May 18, 1917, which enacts that 'any
person who shall wilfully fail or refuse to present himself for regis
tration or to submit thereto as herein provided, shall be gulity of
a misdemeanor and shall, upon conviction in a district court of the
United States, having jurisdiction thereof, be sentenced to imprison
ment for not more than one year, and shall thereupon be duly
registered."
Whether or not stores and busi
ness houses of Butte will be closed
Tuesday, conscription registration
day, which has been proclaimed a
state holiday by Governor Stewart,
will be decided at a special meet
ing of the merchants of the city
called by Secretary Charles Austin
of Butte Chamber of Commerce
for tonight. It was authoritative
ly stated this noon that in all
probability the merchants will de
cide to suspend business for the
day.
Registration of non-resident eligi
ble« for select service draft oc
cupied City Clerk Charles Treacy to
day almost to the exclusion of all
other business. As registration day
approaches, those in Butte whose legal
residence is elsewhere are anxious to
get their card* to the registrars of
their home precincts before Tuesday,
and as a result are applying in large
numbers for registration at the city
clerk's office.
All arrangements for the registra
tion on Tuesday have been completed
(Continued on Page dev «a.)
Government Takes Steps to
Quell the Anti-Draft Agita
tion. Officers Have Made
Many Arrests in Numerous
Cities.
Washington, June 1.—With only
four days more before Tuesday,
draft registration day, the depart
ment of justice planned today to
exert every energy to quell anti
draft agitation, which already has 1
resulted in a number of arrests in :
various cities.
Department of Justice officials say
many persons have responded to their
request that cases of opposition to
draft registration be reported. These
reports are referred for investigation
to l nited States attorneys, marshals,
who have instructions to make ar
rests promptly, when they discover at
tempts to hamper execution of the
draft law. The war department an
nouneed that no man registered would
be required to answer the question of
whether he claims exemption. It will
be sufficient to present his claim if
he is called before an exemption board
later. Officials at seaports and along
United States boundaries have orders
to detain men seeking to leave the
country to avoid registration, and the
war department Is considering means
(Continue on Page Seven.)
STEAM ROLLER OF
ALLIES RUDY TO
START ON A9AIN
French Now in a Position to
Launch New Offensive.
British Advancing.
THE WAR SUMMARY.
Dispatches from the French front
today indicate a renewal soon of the
offensive against the Germans. The
French are in more advantageous po
sitions now than when they began
their offensive in April. I.ast night a
German post in the Chevreux dis
trict, near Craonne, was captured.
The British to the north are again
reporting gains, after a period in
which only raiding operations were
attempted. The advance was scored
in the region of Cherisy, between
C'roissilles and the Arras-Cambri road.
In one of their big attacks during the
height of the Arras battle British
troops were reported as having reached
Cherisy. but were not able to hold It
at the time. They now have pushed
forward again a little to the west of
the town.
Big Movement Pending.
Reports from both Berlin and Lon
don today indicate the probability
that an important military movement
by the allies is under way on the Bel
gian front—possibly an attempt in
force to hit the German flank on the
coast a crushing blow.
pitch of notable intensity such as
-- ,-----...icanj alien as i
usually precedes an attack has been ;
reached by the artillery fire near the
coast and to the south in Ypres dis- j
trlct - I
Meanwhile, British air raids have j
'«-nntirmed on Page Seven.)
:
34 MORE RECRUITS GIVEN ;
A HAPPY SENDOFF TODAY
Volunteers for In
Volunteers for the Naval Serv- 1
Depart This Afternoon ;
ice
From Short Line Station for
Salt Lake City.
A second patriotic demonstration, in
testimony of the high esteem in wKteh
the good citizens of Butte hold those
who have volunteered their services to
Uncle Sam. was held late this after
noon when a large delegation of citi
zens escorted ln automobiles 34 re
cruits for the United States navy to
the Short Line depot, whence they
left for Salt Iatke for further testa and
assignments. It was a demonstration
CEASE RECRUITING
No Conscripted Men Will Go
to France With General
Pershing.
ORDERS RECEIVED FROM
THE ARMY DEPARTMENT
Men Volunteering Now May Go
With the First Expedi
tionary Force.
Enlistments for the regular
army will closfr on June 5, Regis
Itration day, at 8 o'clock in the
morning, according to word re
ceived today by Recruiting Ser
geant Carr, who came over from
Missoula and reopened the local
recruiting station at 2 o'clock this
afternoon.
"We arp now recruiting for General
Pershing's army corps, which will he
nt to France," said Sergeant Carr,
nd I don't think an/ conscripted
men will pro with this expedition."
At 2 o'clock this afternoon Sergeant
Carr started examining a big bunch
of recruits who were gathered outside
the office awaiting his coming.
Seven for Navy.
Seven men were accepted for enlist
ment in the navy today. They are If.
M. Redmond. C. H. Dealon, P. J. Pan
yon. Ë. A. Rouleau, J. E. Comba, M.
2. Powers and John F. Morgan.
Oretl R. Willey and Charles Free
man enlisted in the national guard and
six other applicants awaited exami
nation late this afternoon.
O'Leary to Be Flier.
Arthur O'Leary, son o t Capt T. J.
OT,eary and for several years elevator
man at the courthouse, was accepted
yesterday for the aviation corps of the
army, a branch which has been closed
to enlistment for several weeks. Spe
cial permission for his enlistment wus
given by the war department. Mr.
O'Leary has made special study of
mechanics anti particularly the gaso
line engine. He has an application for
patent for an aeroplane improvement
now pending in the patent office. Mr.
O'Leary is 22 years of age and wm
reared and educated in Butte. He left
for Spokane last night in company
with Recruiting Officer D. R Harlan.
Teacher Enlists.
C. L. Markley, former football coach
and instructor in mathematics at the
Butte high school, resigned as principsl
(Conti nue« on 1 '; ikp Three. I
PEACE RESOLUTION IN
AUS TRIAN PAR LIAMENT
Declares Right of Nations to
Govern Themselves as the
Basis of Peace.
Amsterdam, June 1 (via London).—
According to a Vienna dispatch today
tlie Polish club has decided to author
ize Deputy Daszlnski, in agreement
rith other parties, to introduce an
urgent motion in the lower house of
the Austrian parliament declaring both
the belligerent parties now recognize
the right of nations to govern them
selves as the foundation of a lasting
peace.
The resolution, the dispatch adds,
summons the government in the name
of the house to dp everything possible
"with ail states and peoples who desire
Peace on the basis of an understanding
among the nations, to render such a
peace possible in the immediate fu
ture."
In keeping with the first one held lai
STErÄ
Join the army.
Parried In flag-bedecked automo
biles. the na\ y volunteers weri
brought through the main streets o
the city and all along the line cheeri
broke out as the gallant young fellow
waved their farewells to acquaintance!
on the street. At the depot a most en
thusiastlc reception was given them
Fourteen hundred cigarettes, package
of chewing gum and packages of pea
nut candy were distributed by th(
committee from the Rotary club
headed by Chairman A. L. Matter. an<
admiring ftjenda and relatives a dde<
(Continued on Pag* Seven.';-

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