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The Butte daily post. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1913-1961, June 04, 1917, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053058/1917-06-04/ed-1/seq-7/

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'Now Remember—
met
urry to your grocer's for a
n of Calumet—learn your
lal and best lesson in baking
bake everything with Calu
that proved a failure with
tlier Baking Powders.
'This is the test which
roves Calumet the surest,
afest Baking Powder in the
orki —the most economical
I buy and to use. My
lother has used Calumet for
ears — and there's never a
ake-day failure at our house."
Received Highest Awards
Nrw Cook Book Free —
See Slip in Pound Can
J*0T MADE Wt THE
I'WWVKl
AKING P0WDEI
urmmiMWiwvwMitftinfifu
I .*• <8
*
•v
lie
\VK ONE-THIRD ON YOUK DENTAL
BILLS BY CONSULTING
DAVIS
THESE PRIEES TELL THE
WHOLE STORY
>lid Gold Crown«.......JR f.00
orcelain Crowns . ......84.00
bridge Work, a tooth.....84.00
Silver Fillings ....... JÇ'I 00
'.old Fillings ........$1.50 UP
Till Set of Teeth.. . 810.00
!| Dent.nl Work Guaranteed Per
sonally for Ten Years.
;(!\ Attendant
35-36 Owsley block
PAHK AND MAIN.
j
i
'
,
i

ÄS CAMPAIGN
FM LIBERTY BONDS
ay Congregations Hear Ar-1
merits in Favor of Loan
to Government
p ei> church of the city yester
«'•tholic and Protestant letter»
»'•»<1 and arguments given In fa
T the Liberty loan bonds. It was
p ntly explained to the congrega
ttiai puri ha.se of the govern
bonds for the prosecution of the
r dn not alone a duty on gvery
but a privilege and from an
nent point of view a most de
thing.
ntion was also drawn to the
I
(
I
(
this afternoon at the
when visiting speakers ,
plea for the Liberty loan
of the speaker* pointed
that the man who subscribed
f r the v>ar, through the pur
"f bonds, money which he will
hack again with Interest, was j
Ut h a patriot as the man who '
• the front or the man who cul- I
the farm and so provides for
Mipply of the nation. j
addresses in e\ery instance ■
•Med to with the greatest in
•î n* ^ er *iî 8 doubt hut that j
w ill do its part nobly In the
r ^f raising its percentage of the
»«liions asked for.
ORIAL SERVICES
BY THE ODD FELLOWS
John G. Ross of the Trinity M
urch was the speaker yesterday
1<K>n at the annual memoriul ex
? hv the Odd Fellows and
chekahs of this city. The usual
mnsical numbers were given
program concluded with the
P* of "America" The services
Vef y impressive.
MINES ALUMNI HOED
THE ANNUAL BANQUET
Association Selects P. L. Pauly
as President for the
Next Year.
The alumni of the Montant State
School of Mines held the annual ban
quet at the Finlen hotel Saturday
night and elected the following ofli
rer« for the ensuing year: President.
P. L Pauly; first vice president. O. M
Fowler; second vice ('resident. Ken
neth Kirby; secretary-treasurer, A. E.
Adami, member of the executive com
mittee, J. H Manwaring.
P L. Pauly was toastmaster, and
among the speakers was Chancellor K.
^ Blliott, who believed that the pree
**nt war would last five years and cm
phaslzed the need of technical men in
the service of the government,
--------
M'DANIELS SPEAKER AT
WOODMEN EXERCISES
Attorney A. C. McDaniel« paid flt
ting tribute yesterday to the members
0 f the Neighbors of the Woodmen of
the World who had been called into the
Great Beyond during the past year. He
the speaker of the day at the an
nual exercises held by the Woodmen
hail. The program as given
In the Po«t Saturday was carried out
and the ritualistic part of the work
impressive.
DUMONT HAS SEAPLANE
TO FIGHT SUBMARINES
Paris, June 4.—M. Dumont, the Bra
zilian aviator, ha« invented a power
ful type of seaplane for fighting sub
marines, according to a Turin dispatch,
which says that the new machine will
be manufactured in the United States.
COMPENSATION ACT
A
Under it 1,860 Employers and
70,000 Employes Are
Reported.
Helena. June 4.—In the 23 month«
during which the workmen's compensa
tion law has been in operation, 1,860
employers elected to come under the
act, bringing with them 70,000 em
ployes. During this time there has
been paid out $668,567.66. which, with
pending claims of $110.000, makes a
total liability to date of $778,667.65.
These figures are shown in a report
made by the industrial accident board
to Governor Stewart.
The total accidents reported to date
number 14,244, of which 226 were fatal;
11 totally disabled; 256 permanently
partially disabled; 13,692 temporarily
totally disabled; of which number 3,465
received compensation and 10,760 re
turned to work before the expiration
of the two weeks' waiting period, and
were only furnished the medical and
hospital attention provided by the act.
of the fatal», 152 were In quartz mines.
31 In coal mine». 32 in »melting, l ...
construction work, 10 in lumbering,
11 in electrical power work and 22 In
miscellaneous occupation».
Self-Insurance.
mployers, 60 qualified
! Washington
$440.000.
1
j
Employers'
Of the 1,860 (
under (Ian one to carry their own
risk and pay compensation direct to
their Injured employes. They brought
with them under the act 22,708 pm*
ploves reported for the year 1915,
now fully 40.000), and have paid out in
compensation of all kinds (Including
pending claims) $581,890.86. Thif
computed on the reported annual pay
roll (year 1916) of $31.268.298, which, at
the some ratio for the 23 months,
amounts to $59.901.734, indicates an
< ldent cost of less than 1 per cent,
if computed on the actunl payroll
would likely show a cost of less 1
one-half of one per cent, which, In
dit ion to indicating very cheap Insur
ance. also evidence« the gratifying fact
j of a low accident record.
Risk by Insurance Companies.
T'nder plan two, which provides oom
1 anv insurance, 1,119 employer« oper
ated, reporting 16.060 employes, who,
through 13 different Insurance com
i I finie», paid out In compensation (In
' I hiding pending claims). $149,163.97.
, which, computed on the reported an
imal payroll (year 1916) or $12.065.680
• »r $2''.,135,879 for the 23 months. In
i < atcs an actual necident cost of 1
than three-fourths of one per cent of
e pay roll, « hlch w ould indicate that
î resent premium rates might he safely
■ reduced
State Fund Insurance.
I Plan three, called "state Insurance,
j was selected by 681 employers, witl
< 218 dtnploÿefl. account which the stnt
has paid out in compensation of a]
kinds $38.106.85, with pending claims
aggregating about $12.000. makl
n total of $50,106.85, which, computed
on the reported annual payroll
$3.204.893, or $6.142 702 for the
months, shows an accident cost of 1
than one per cent, which indicates that
the premium rates fixed by the legis
lature for plan three are. like the In
surance companies* rates, too high;
hut the equalizer under ( lan three
Ists In the authority given the hoard
to pass the monthly assessment when
the money is not needed. Fo far only
four assessments have been levied out
of a possible 20. yet the Industrial
fund Is In food shape and shows a liai
once of $30.635.99 on hand. There ha:
been collected a total of $68,742 84
which Indicate» a premium cost of
about one per < ent. whl< h Is perhnj
the cheapest Insurance protection i
existence.
994 Plants Inspected.
During the past 23 months 994 plants
have heen Inspected and many recom
mendations for the safety of employ
made Forty-three quarts mines, 26
eoal mines and 695 hollers havs also
been Inspected and 1,200 engineers'
licenses Issued.
The report also shows that In the
thousands of ca*es passed by the
board no appeals have been made, the
rulings of the board being eminently
satisfactory.
The expenses of the hoard amount
to 152,293.66. against which has been
earned 14.494 70, lea\ ing a net expendi
ture of »47.798 96. This Is gratifying,
as the expenditures In other state«
w-here the law has been In operation
j have lasen much greater. Nevada
spent over »60,000, Oregon »100,000,
j Washington »220,000 and California
MOUNT LASSEN AGAIN
IN VIOLENT ERUPTION
Redding. Cal.. June 4.—A violent
eruption of Ijuisen Peak, which was
preceded by a subterranean explosion
felt for miles around, occurred here
early today. The volcano sent forth
a black ashy cloud of great volume
which obliterated the sun for more
than one hour when It was blown
southward by a high wind. The
eruption was apparently growing I:
activity with unprecedented rapidity.
Notice, Electrical Workers.
Members of local Union No. 65 are
notified to attend meeting June 8,
1917 Important business.
W C. MEDHUR8T. Sec y — Adv.
PIRATES WIN.
The Pirates yesterday defeated the Sky
larks In the Junior league by the score
of 11 to 4. Dugan and thins mo were the
battery for the winners, while Vankusbld
and Cunningham work. 1 at the points for
the losers.
FUNERAL OF HRS. WHITE.
The funeral or Mrs. Kettle K. White
»'«» held this afternoon from the faun
lly residence. 810 South Montana
atreet. Rev. M. Hudtloff officiated.'
Interment was made In Mount Mo
nah cemetery.

Don't be discouraged
Resinol Soap
will clear your skin
Many and many a girl has a clear,
healthy complexion today because some
friend came to her with that sound ad
vice. Resinol Soap not only is delight
fully cleansing and refreshing, but its
daily use reduces the tendency to pim
ples, offsets many ill-effects of cosmetics,
and gives nature the chance she needs to
make red, rough skins white and soft.
If tha skin is la b«4 shape, through neglect or im
proper treatment, a little Resinol Ointment should
st first be used with the Resi
nol Soap, to hasten the return
to normal conditions. Resinol
Soap and Resiael Ointment
are sold bp all drugguta.
WISCONSIN GRIDS IN
PATRIOTIC MEETING
Demonstration for Flag Marks
the Annual Banquet
Gathering.
Chancellor Elliott of the University
of Montana was the speaker of the
•vening at the annunl banquet by the
ilumni of the University of Wisconsin
Saturday evening at the Silver Bow
lub. HI« topic was "The War,"
he predicted that the "Grads of Old
Wisconsin" would cheerfully do their
part for the government In the emer
cy. There were several other
speakers, ull of whom praised the
loyalty being shown not alone by the
Wisconsin men hut through the coun
y In general. There were cheers and
ngs and a most enthusiastic rally
for the flag. J. H. Warner was toast
master. There were .30 present.
DR. T. V. MOORE Will
LEAVE FOR FRANCE
Former City Physician to Take
Preliminary Training at
FortMacKenzie.
Dr. T. V. Moor«, former city phy
sician. will JenÉfe tomorrow night for
Fort Mai KmgP, wyo., whera he
Join the medical corps which
shortly leave for France. At Fort
MacKenzle, Dr. Moore expects to meet
several of the men ho attended school
with at Creighton university. He
one of the first of several Butte doc
tors to volunteer service.
GLORY HOLE OF TREADWELL
MINE TO RE TAILING PIT
Juneau, Alaska, June 4.—Regardless
of what may he done In reclaiming the
main workings of the Treadwell mine
which were flooded recently following
a cavelh. the fate of the "Glory hole"
I« Healed. This famous open work of
the second largest gold mine in the
world Is to become a tailing pit.
The glory hole Is 500 feet across and
» ma i 500 U nt long! - ira from this
chasm was crushed years ago and tons
of gold extracted. At one time it
yawned open to a depth of 900 feet.
Then the side» caved and It filled to
within 300 feet of the surface.
This plug of surface rock was the
safety catch which prevented the
flooding of the lower workings and en
abled the men below to escape when
one of the big stopes on the 1,400 level
gave way under the edge of the Oas
tlneau channel, allowing the waters to
pour into the upper drifts and tunnel».
The water soaked through this plug in
lesa than two hours and thundered
down into the mine.
Many of the stopes In the lower lev
els were great caverns from 200 to 300
feet wide and twice as high and long.
Air imprisoned In these chambers,
2,000 feet below the surface, was com
pressed until It forced Its way through
crevices to the surface under the long
tailing dump and the mud boiled up In
hundreds of places like so many little
craters for hours after the collapse.
The glory hole, while always an at
traction to visitors and tourists, has
long been a menace, and one of the
first decisions of the mine chiefs was
to turn the tailings from the mill still
In operation Into the chasm, which will
be filled, hut it will take years to com
plete the Job.
CASTOR IA
For Infants and Children
In Um ForOvar 30 Years
Always bean
the
Signature
WILL ROUND UP ALL
"HOBOES" ON TRAINS
Railroad official# In Montana hava
betn instructed by the heads of the
railroad tines to give every assistance
in their isjwer to the federal author
ities in rounding uu "slackers" after
tomorrow "Hoboes" will be arrested
on trains and turned over to the au
thorities If they cannot show their
registration cards.
WILL CURE FOR
THE VOLUNTEERS
Congregations to Adopt En
listed Men and Provide
Delicacies.
Through the Silver Bow Ministerial
association the members of the dif
ferent congregation« of the Protestant
churches of the city will keep in touch
with the hoys who have left Butte for
the army and navy and furnish them
with the local papers and with various
delicacies. This was decided upon this
morning at the special meeting of the
association. Secretary Rev. L. A. Wil
son was instructed to secure
names of the enlisted men In all de
partments. The enlistments will he
divided among the congregations and
each enlistment will be assigned to a
special member of tho congregation.
The question of the annual picnic,
for which the special meeting was
culled, will not he decided until July
2. The ministers have now formally
adjourned for the summer holidays,
June, July and August. Instead ot
meeting on every Monday they will
meet during the summer on the first
Monday in July.
BERNARD REGIN GOES
T D JOIN 0. S. ARMY
Brother of Well-Known Hotel
Man, University Gradu
ate, Enlists.
Bernard Regan, brother of Jack j
Regan, proprietor of the ifcgun hotel
near Silver Bow, was among the
cruits In the marine corps to lc,
Butte lust Saturday night. He
receive orders in Portland end from
there will probably go to San Fr
cisco. The young man graduated from
the University of Notre Dome. While
entitled to n trial for a commission, ho
chose to enlist as a private. J
promised his brother he would n
him In France when the age limit is
raised.
HIRSCH LODGE FIRST
FRATERNAL BODY TO
BUY LIBERTY BONOS
for
of
it
to
the
the
to
in
In
Baron de Hirsch lodge No. 420, I. O
B. P»., voted $500 to purchase LIbertj
bonds at its meeting Inst night. The
lodge is the first local fraternal organ
ization to purchase war bonds. Wh»
the motion was made it was unani
mously carried by a rising vote.
The lodge also went on record tr
keep # ail members who »-nlist. in good
standing during their period of se
Ice. During their period <>f service
dues will he suspended and these mem
bers will receive all regular l«»dg*
benefits.
MUNITION FACTORY
NEAR PARIS BLOWS UP
Parts, June 4 All Paris was awak
ened about 4 o'clock this morning by
a detonation .« hen a factory in Auber- i
I villlers, a suburb, exploded with such j
force that nothing was left of the j
structure whllo the roofs of nearby
buildings were carried away. No cas- j
ualties have been reported.
CHILDREN'S SERVICE
AT THE LOWELL CHURCH
A special children's «lay service was
the feature of yesterday morning's
services at the Lowell Avenue Metho
dist Episcopal church. The program
wag devoted to the Biblical subject,
"The King's Garden." and the musical !
and literary talent of the congregation
took part. Kdward Saunders preached
at the evening services and solos were
sung by Miss Lucinda Fluent, soprano;
Phelix Mac Neal, tenor; Edward Davis,
baas, and Mrs. W. J. Gray, contralto.
Instrumental numbers were rendered
by Miss B«rtha Halverson, pianist,
and Garnet Fischer, violinist.
EMMA MINE PRODUCING
ON A^LARGE SCALE
Nearly 200 tons of ore a day is being
hoisted from the Emma mine, which is
running in the vicinity of 14 per cent
sine, 7 per cent lead and nearly 7
ounces of sliver to the ton. The vein
on the 1,000 foot level has been en
countered and conditions are very en
couraging Sinking of the shaft to a
depth of 1,600 feet is now proceeding
Drifting is now going on east and west
and on the east end the same rich ore
that «ai found on the 600 and 800 foot
levels is being encountered.
FOUR MEN KILLED IN
CANADIAN^ COAL MINE
Nanaimo, B. C.. June 4.- The foci
men killed by an explosion of gas ic
No. * mine of the Canadian Collieries
company at Cumberland Sunday
morning were Georgs Bertram, chief
surveyor; Louis Murdock, assistant
surveyor; John Bobbo, Are boss, and
J. D. Brough, miner. The four bodies
were recovered, terribly mangled. The
party was making its usual Sunday
excursion to the mine to map out work
for the following week.
Thomas T-eaman. fireman, narrow
ly escaped being asphyxiated. He war
s member of s rescue party and was
overcome by smoke but was quickly
brought to the surface and taken to
the Cumberland hospital and revived.
OPERATION SUCCESSFUL.
Rllen Lynch, the 5-year-old daugh
ter of Judge J. J. Lynch, was' oper
ated on last evening at St. James' hos
pital for appendicitis. The operation
was highly successful and the little
girl is reported as getting along nlcsly ;
today.
Bay^rTablets
Aspirin
Accept only Genuine
Aspirin sold as follows:
Beyer-Tablets of Aspirin sold in
pocket boxes of 12—bottle* of 24 and
bottles of 100«
on
Bayer-Capsules of Aspirin sold in
sealed packages of one and two dozen*
4 The Bayer Cf 03 $—Yonr L'.very package and every tablet
Guarantee cl I'u-Ity" bu "" B * yer Cr °"
et
*r v 4
The badp.fsa.-k "Aaplria" (P /.U ha c»*r
art~. ihet tha moeoacHicacitU»'.*/ rf aa3cyi.ra.-lj ii t!-j«o
t&Lku on J calcules h ci the ■où.-.LL UljCI n .^ tm ia .iufc .
n
en
LET'S TALK ABOUT OUR TEETH
AND A GOOD DENTIST
j
- 7 Jfel
si
%
jr
The longer you have neg
lected your teeth the moro
reasons there are why you
should engage the services of
a SPECIALIST on CROWN
and BRIDGE WORK.
Skillful treatment, conscien
tious care, best quality ma
terial and the very best opera
tions are a few of the main
features of my service. Ex
amination free.
Dr. Francis Atwell
Pyorrhea. Crown and Bridge
Specialist.
"•OS llaly Hank Bldg. Phone 2197
TO STANDARDIZE TRUCK
EQUIPMENT FOR ARMY
Washing!,
tensions f»n
4 Standard
-
'
hading manufacturers, it was a
nouuced today by the society of aut
mobile engineets, following a series of
ri upon by
WH9 an _
the council of national defens
Weekly meetings of truck r
turers and engineers will he
You Read It In
The POST the Same Day
The Post Takes
Good Care of
Local News
I N very large per
centage the Post's
circulation centers
in Butte and at its
bureaus in Anaconda,
Dillon and Deer Lodge.
As every patron of the
Post knows, it is alert
with respect to the news
that is of direct interest
in these communities.
T he bulk of the
World's Daylight Press
NEWS is Gathered Day
after Day, at Eastern Centers, and
is Sent Out, Due to the Difference
in Time, so That it Can Be
Printed and Delivered to the POST
Readers at an early Evening Hour
C ARRIERS deliver
it at your door
for 50 cents a
month. It is a pleasant
evening companion in
your home. Butte's best
advertisers use its
pages constantly. It
keeps right up with
the newt and—
You Can Get the
Post at a Price
That's Low
You Read It In
The POST the Same Day
Washington and Detroit to perfect the
standardization code and a confer
ence in Washington to consider stand
ardizing axh-s, radiators and frames
has been called for June 15.
A DOUBLE WEDDING.
1
*
P*rf
terdi
double we
rmed by R»
ildi:
M. D. Hudtloff yes
The contracting
nes K. Allen and
Miss Elizabeth Welter, and William
Welter and Mis* Viola Ryan.
THE POST FOR THE NEWS

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