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The Butte daily post. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1913-1961, July 11, 1917, Image 3

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053058/1917-07-11/ed-1/seq-3/

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«ICALKNAfl
Iw.*
|l7Z. W.rARI
' S^tmi NAIN
»Buy Right. Do You?
EN YOU PAY MORE THAN LU
PRICE YOU PAY FOR
J)IT—AND WHY SHOULD YOU
Fou ARE DEALING FOR CASH?
Fas you combine your efforts of
dealing with a store that gives
»rer cash price, you are apt to
discouraged and fall back to the
|way, not realizing that discour
nent was the result of the lack
rightly applied cash dealing.
Un you shop at Lutey's savings
|as sure and steady as the sun is
et, and your shopping will be
right.
fcpiNG UP THE BARGAINS AT
LUTEY'S
Awake for Bargains" is the
an for Lutey's. Bargains that
merit and prices that appeal.
Is another one for tomorrow:
ÿornia new yellow onions, mam
size, mild table quality, excel
cooking variety, splendid sliced
steak; nice when boiled and
ncd. Use them freely, the price
Extra special, 10 lbs.. ...25c
Fay and tomorrow only
big extra free stamp offer
s tomorrow night. Today and
orrow the last chance to secure
[EXTRA FREE STAMPS with 98
nd sack or FIFTY EXTRA with
K-pound sack of either Lutana,
Ident, X-L or Premium flour,
loaves of better bread is our
claim for these flours.
OLD OR NEW
F, while CalifdFnia potatoes, 100
nds .......................$4.00
ounds ....................$2.03
bounds ....................$1.10
fendid quality old potatoes for
fee enjoying old ones; special low
e, 50 lbs ..................$1.60
C. & B. PICKLES 75c
, the genuine Cross & Blackwell
ious sour gherkins, crisp, snappy,
J spiced, Inc ideal relish of those
■ring a hot spiced sour pickle.
*1 quart C. & B., 95c size gherkins,
special while they last.....75c
I $1.25 CRYSTAL ICE CREAM
■ FREEZERS, SPECIAL 95c.
IRE'S ROOT BEER EXTRACT
Fini, three bottles ...........50c
SHIPMENT BRAN COOKIES
(cate, nutritious, laxative; 5-lb.
$1.25; pound ..............25c
FINEST FANCY HEAD RICE
n does the occasion occur for
a sale of finest head rice as we
cut here. Large, bright kernels,
blished rice, 12V6c quality, extra
Hal, 8 lbs 75c; 4 lbs. 40c; 2 lbs.
[.............................25c
THE BIG SUGAR DEALS
CONTINUE—
I a great saving they amount to.
proly pays to take advantage of
these generous deals.
ounds sugar...............$1.70
With ? 10.00 order.
ounds sugar...............$2.10
With $12.50 order.
ounds sugar...............$4.05
With $20 00 order.
ROVE TOMORROWS BREAK
W1TH LUTEY'S F R E S H
ROASTED COFFEE.
»ouvemrs
Of Butte
in Copper
|a. Spoons, Jewel Boxes, Match
», Fobs, etc., priced from 35c up.
ling Silver Birth and Souvenir
■ns, new and up-to-date deaifns,
priced from $1 up.
/LE - WINTERHALTER
HANNIFIN CO.
101 West Park Street
)NER WILL PROBE
KILLING OF SULLIVAN
killing of Patrick H. Sullivan
kt I.eggan at tys saloon. 73 East
street, early yesterday morn
^111 be investigated by Coroner
i inquest to be held tomor
$fternoon. Sullivan was accl
killed by Leggan when ho
rom his cabin to give w'arning
oldup in progress at his saloon,
distance away. Sullivan was
[on the ground Just opposite the
j door and In Leggan's random
fire.
pvan will be burled tomorrow
The funeral will be held
Ihe home of his sister, Mrs. Km
4urphy of 119 West Woolman
*t 9 o'clock, proceeding to St.
church, where a high mass
Ruiem will be celebrated. In
to* will be made In the Catholic
Misses Agnes and Gladys Sul
|of 816 West Quartz street have
Jto the Morris ranch at Potomac
Jnd their summer vacation. They
toke absent about a month.
CLLrANS
solutely Removes
Mgestiop. One package
resit 25cat fall druggists.
DEMANDS TO SE
State Metal Trades Council
Anrees on Proposed
Wage Scale.
(Continued from Pago One.)
the agreement reached by the strike
committee and the Montuna Power
company. President Frank J. Mc
Nulty of the international union will
lead the fight of the conservatives for
the ratification of the agreement, while
1. F. Dunne, chairman of the strike
ommltte, In an effort to keep the
mines tied up, will lead the radicals
In their fight against the adoption of
the agreement.
Heavy Vote Polled.
A heavy vote is being polled at Finn
hall, where the Metal Mine Workers'
union Is today holding a referendum
on the question of affiliation with the
International Union of Mine, Mill and
Smelter workers of the American Fed
ration. Long before the polls opened
at 9 a m. there was a crowd of miners
ready to vote and all morning and
well into the afternoon the line in
waiting to vote ran from 50 to 100
men. The polls close at 9 o'clock this
ening.
Tom Campbell and other leaders In
the Butte Metal Mine Workers' union
are making capital of a statement
made by Ecxecutlve Committeeman
William Davidson of the International
Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter
Workers to the effect that affiliation
with the American Federation in this
instance can only be made by the
miners as individuals and that if tho
union votes for affiliation, the execu
tive committe would order them back
to work for the reason that the Moyer
organization has not authorized a
strike in the Rutte district. This
statement, issued by the union's press
committee, is luring handed to each
oter.
Spite of the fact that this construc
ion leads inevitably to tho conclusion
that the Metal Workers' union could
not exist in case of affiliation, those in
favor of joining with the Moyer or
ganization have not given up the light.
orge I. Eekman, one of the charter
members of tho Metal Mine Workers'
nion, who has taken a leading part
in the campaign for affiliation, de
clared today that he believed the Butte
miners would yet Join the American
Federation.
Claims a Victory.
"I do not concede that the union
has gone against affiliation," he said
fternoon. "1 believe the major
ity of the miners of this district want
to be allied with the American Feder
ation of Labor as they know that only
through such alliance can they win
their demands. There will be a big
vote this evening.
'You may say for me," added Mr
Ecknmn, "that I am about to bring
suit for damages against the Metal
Mine Workers' union for accusing me
of doing business with the Sixth floor.
In a bulletin that was called to my
attention this morning I find they have
made this charge and I propose, to give
them a chance to prove it."
"Muckie" McDonald, president of the
organization that three years ago put
an end to the old miners' union and
that ran Charles H. Moyer and some of
his associates out of the district, is in
Butte. Muckie. known during the
period in which he and his friend Joe
Bradley dominated the camp as "King
Muckie," was sent to the penitentiary
with Bradley. Bradley died there,
Muckie was released hut sent back be
cause he disturbed a political meeting
at the Auditorium. Later he finished
his term and wont to Arizona
friend telegraphed him to "beat it to
Butte" as the "thing was going fine."
At that time Muckie had left Globe.
It was said by some of his old as
sociates here that he has been work
ing recently on the Pacific coast,
any event. Muckie is back in Butte.
Takes a New Turn.
Tom Campbell and the leaders of the
Metal Mine Workers union were much
disturbed last night when it was re
ported that affiliation with the In
ternational Union of Mine, Mill and
Smeltsr Workers will mean that the
miners must return to work and that
they cannot Join the Moyer organiza
tion as a body, but must do so as in
dividuals.
The report came from a committee
that had waited upon William David
son, member of the executive board of
the International Mine. Mill and Smel
termen's union. The committee put
the question fairly before Mr. David
son, who replied that the men if they
Join the International union will have
to go to work as the Moyer union has
not declared a strike. Furthermore
the miners will have to Join the Moyer
organization as individuals, declared
Mr. Davidson. Regarding the question
of wages, Mr. Davidson told the com
mittee that It will have to be taken
up In the regular manner as provided
by the rules of the Moyer organization
and the American Federation of Labor.
Campbell and his lieutenants then
decided to make a final effort to pre
vent affiliation. This consisted in the
issuance of the following campaign
bulletin by the rress committee of
the Metal Mine Workers:
Issues a Bulletin.
"The statement made by William
Davidson of the executive board of the
International Union of Mine. Mill and
Smelter Workers to the
mlttee of the Metal Mlne^Vorkere
union in regards to affiliation is as
follows: !
• That In the event of the Metal Mine j
Workers union voting to affiliate with !
the above-named International union, i
the executive committee of the 1. II. M.
M * a W. would Immediately order |
them all t>a& to work, and that the
Metal Miners would j
be recognized. individuals." i
| be required tb '"""Xon 1
I Executive V®""" , Mlu an d j
j Smeltermen^s 'union lost no time In |
answering the Campbell campaign cir
cular. Davidson's answ'er consists of
the following statement: '
"Owing to mistakes that may arise
or misstatements that have or may be
made, we desire to 6tate that upon af
filiation by the miners of this district
with the International Mine, Mill and
Smelter Workers of the A. F. of L. that
as soon as tho representatives of the
local miners' district council can be
selected to act with the like committee
from the Building Trades council, the
Metal Trades council as a Joint com
mittee, that thereupon united action
will bo utilized by this committee, in
conjunction with the international rep
resentatives to secure every result pos
sible. favorable to the united require
ments of tho organized international
labor movement of this district."
Radicals Turned Down.
The Silver Bow Trades and Labor
assembly at Its weekly meeting last
night ousted the radicals, which had ;
been in control for the past six months,
by el*»cthig J. B Finley president over
Scott, who held the position.
Finlay is one of the conservative labor
men, he being also financial secretary
of Carpenters' union. He has been
Identified with the labor movement
here for 20 years.
Dunne, chairman of the strike
committee of the electricians and the
who has been trying to keep the
copper output of Butte tied up. was
defeated for the secretaryship by D.
Farrell. The vote was 39 to 28. Far
rell also is recognized as one of the
conservative labor men of the district.
E. R. Torrey had no opposition for
vice president and Margaret Benne
fleld was elected statistician without
opposition.
Senator Walsh to Act.
At yesterday afternoon's meeting of
the Metal Mine Workers' union a mes
sage from United States Senator T.
J. Walsh was read in which the sena
tor declared he had prepared a resolu
tion for a congressional probe of the
Butte labor situation. A copy of the
resolution which Senator Walsh wrote
and plans to introduce in the senate
provides for an appropriation of $25,
000 for an investigation into the labor
troubles as well as the Granite Moun
tain mine disaster. In drafting his
resolution, Senator Wal3h writes he
was Inspired by reports that German
influences are responsible for the
Butte tieup.
Under the resolution tho inquiry
would be conducted by a board, one
member to be chosen by the senate,
another by the house of representa
tives and the third member to be the
director of the bureau of mines. The
resolution provides for an Investigation
of the "strike at Butte, Mont., and oth
ers occurring in states west of the
Mississippi river within the past six
months and also to Inquire into the
cause of the said fire and into the pr
cautions that ore being taken to pre
vent similar eatastrophles in the metal
mines in said region."
The commission under the resolution
would report to congress on or before
Dee. 1 next.
The Senator's Letter.
In his letter accompanying a copy
of the resolution and addressed
John Doran, chairman of the press
committee, Metal Mine Workers' union,
Senator Walsh said:
"I received some days ago- copy
the resolution adopted by the Metal
Mine Workers' union on Saturday,
June 23, in which a congressional in
vestigation Is asked first as to the
api ailing disaster at the North Butte
and, second, as to the grievances in
consequence of which the prevailing
strike was called
"I was horrified at the catastrophe
referred to, the most horrible, so far
as I can recall, that has occurred in
the history of Butte, and I am dis
posed, ns I wired you, to ask
quiry by the bureau of mines. We
have charged that department of the
government with the general duty of
investigating preventable accidents in
mines and educating those engaged in
the hazardous work of mining li
methods calculated to reduce fatal!
ties. The federal government having
thus assumed to exercise jurisdiction
over that subject, It would not be
inappropriate to direct that investiga
tion be made of a particular disaster
of sufficient importance to attract the
attention of the nation.
"I hesitated to Introduce the reso
lutlyn, however, because of the labor
troubles which followed hard on the
heels of the fire lest they should be
intensified by any Inconsiderate action
on my part or on the part of congress.
"I am sure that you have as pro
found a sense as I of the supreme
importance of keeping the production
of the mines up to any past record
and to pass it If possible. The farm
ers throughout the country have been
urged, on patriotic grounds, to plant
every available acre. We need metal
—copper, zinc, iron, aluminum—almost
if not quite as badly as we do food
and fuel. I find It difficult at this
distance to gee into intimate touch
with the situation out there and have
little ground for any opinion concern
ing the points of difference betw
the miners and the employers. I ex
press the hope that whatever they are
they may be composed in a spirit of
devotion to our common country in
this time of trial and extreme peril.
But whatever the differences may be,
there is ordinarily no ground for fed
eral Interference or a congressional
inquiry Into a strike, as you of course
know. When labor troubles have per
sisted for a long time and
charged that the local government has
utterly broken down and laboring men
can have no real remedy In the courts
of the state, or when military courts
are set up before which strikers are
haled, and by which they are sent to
the penitentiary without trial by Jury,
a s was the case in connection with
! the 6trike »ome years ago In Colorado,
j Michigan and West Virginia, congres
! atonal lnvtatigatlons have been or
i dered, but there must be some basis
for federal action to Induce congress
| to move In the premises.
^ German Influence.
j ■.'There is only one basis of the
i strike now unhappily on In Butte that
1 will afford ground for the congres
j Bional Investigation, namely. the
| charge that German aympathlxers and
there is no such imputation. I cer
tainly do not mean to chance it. but
the charge has been made, and if the
Metal Mine Workers' union is desirous
of having an investigation by congress
there# is no more certain way of se
curing it than to make the charge of
seditious Influences tho groundwork
upon which to appeal to congress."
REFUSE TO LET I, IN, IN.'S
ENTER THE NEXT SEITE
(Continued from Page One.)
possibly German agents are responsi
ble in some measure for the trouble.
This charge has been made through
the public press and by public officials.
It would be quite proper for congress
to direct an Investigation into a strike
to determine whether such an element
does In fact enter into It. In an in
quiry as to whether a particular strike
has such an origin, opportunity would
of course be given to those directing
It to disclose the truth about the
matter and to make It plain that there
Is no seditious element in it, but that
it arises by reason of grievances of a
serious nature demanding immediate
and appropriate redress. With these
ideas tn mind I have drafted a resolu
tion of inquiry, copy of which is here
with sent you. I appreciate that it
might be thought in some quarters
that the resolution carries an implica
tion that the Butte strike originated
in and is engineered by German in
fluences, but it will be recognized,
upon a study of the resolution, that
few hours later,
left the train
next eastbound train a
The deported men
heie.
Have Many Complaints.
Many of the T. W. W. claimed they
had been victims of unfortunate cir
cumstances and of the union miners
and mine operators. Several said they
had been forced to leave claims they
were working near Jerome and join
picket lines during the strike called
Friday. One claimed he had been
taken from his home four hours after
his wife gave birth to a child. Many
complained of the summary manner
in which they were hustled out of Je
rome.
Sheriff J. N. Cohenour telegraphed
Gov. Thomas K. Campbell at Jerome
asking what disposition should be
made of the remaining 42 prisoners.
Meantime citizens held a meeting at
the courthouse to decide the same
question. The I. W. W.'s asked to be
returned to Jerome.
GOVERNOR ORDERS THE
SHERIFF TO RELEASE MEN
Phoenix. Ariz., July 11.—The sheriff
of Mohave county at Kingman todav
wired Governor Campbell, informing
him that he had 61 1. W. W.'s detained
there and asked what he should do
with them. Governor Campbell wired
back that unless he has some specific
charge to place against them they
should he released
Governor Campbell gave out a state
ment in which he stated that nothing
is to be gained by deporting the I
W. W.'s from place to place.
"It only means that the I. W. W
will eventually land In some weak
spot In tho state and then there will
be trouble," he said. "It is prac
tically impossible to handle the I. W
W. situation legally In Arizona."
SETTLEMENT AT GLOBE
SEEMS REMOTE TODAY
Globe, Ariz., July 11.—Settlement of
the copper miners' strike in Arizona,
which have completely stopped produc
tion in the whole field and curtailed
work a third, seemed remote today.
Apparently both the mine owners and
the strikers are unwilling to recede
from their original positions.
Walter S. Douglas, president of the
Phelps Dodge company, declared last
night the mine owner could not treat
either with the Industrial Workers of
the World or with the International
Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter work
ers.
Fear <>f trouble over an order of
Sheriff Tom Armer that only one
picket would be allowed within an
area of a quarter of a mile square
was allayed by instructions from Gov.
Thomas E. Campbell that the pickets
were acting within their rights so
long as they were peaceful.
Reports from Blsbee indicate that
more nien are returning to work there
daily. The three principal companies
operating in that district have served
notice on their former employes that
men who do not return to wo. k by Fri
day will be treated as new' applicants.
MOYER SAYS ARIZONA
SITUATION IMPROVES
Denver, Colo.. July 11
tion in Arizona is |rmv,
statement Issued by r
president of the In*
of Mine. Mill and Sm
"The sltua
ing," said a
•s H. Moyer,
ional Union
er Workers,
today. "All our men ha\e gone back
to work at Jerome following a confer
ence with officers of the United Verde
company, and I believe that at Globe
and Miami we will get together with
the employers in a few days and ef
fect a settlement.''
decorator passes away.
Joseph Meier, aged 33 years, one of
the best decorators In the Btate, died
this morning. He came here several
years ago to do special painting and
decorating on several residences and
business houses and remained here up
to the time of his deatth. He was a
member of the Painters an<^ Decora
u>rs' union. He Is survived by two
brothers. The remains are at the
Daniels & Bllboa funeral parlors
awaiting word from the brothers with
regard to the funeral arrangements.
WISE GI&L.
"Miss Bright is a practical girl, isn't
she:'' said Jones.
"She certainly la," agreed Smith.
"She is wearing a gold engagement
tooth. She needed the tooth, and she
got her fiance to pay for the tooth
instead of buying her an engagement j
ring." I
U. S. HUES
WORLD'S BEST
Ed Stanley, Formerly of Post,
Tells of Life on Mare
Island.
"No wonder the United States ma
rines are the finest soldiers in the
world," writes Ed Stanley, formerly
of tho répertoriai staff of the Post and
now on Mare Island with the United
States marine training barracks. Mr.
Stanley is a graduate of the Univer
sity of Montana. In part Mr. Stanley
says, after explaining that a number
of the boys were In San Francisco
two days' holiday:
for ;
"Montana's marines have made an
Impression on tho Island. Nearly 100
Montanans are here. They are mak
ing good at the job of learning to be
soldiers.
"In the July 4 field meet five of
them scored heavily. Four of them,
"Dutch" Moulthen, Harden, Bailey and
myself, were from Butte.
"Friends would not know us now-,
tanned as we are beyond all recogni
tion and hardened like gridiron ath
letes. We are working dafly in the I
. wind and rain to learn the dif
ficult are of being marines.
''The camp resembles a huge foot
ball training camp, there are so many
college athletes and so much athletic
ctivity. The men spend their time
when not drilling playing like a das.*
of freshmen turned loose on a grid
iron field.
"You should see us scrubbing
dothea. Every man has to do his own
laundry. It is a Hight which would
fill the home folks with Joy. There
is but ene way and time to do every
thing from washing clothes to clean
ing our teeth.
"The spirits of all are high and we
are anxious to cross the Atlantic."
I*i his letter Mr. Stanley, who is
also a member of the Butte Univer
sity club, conveys his kindest regards
to *»11 his friends here.
UNDERTAKERS.
LEHN —Frederick W. Lehn, aged 54
years, died this morning. The body
was removed to Richards' parlors. An
nouncement of the funeral will appear
In later papers.
MOORE-— G. M. Moore, aged S3
years, died yesterday. The body was
removed to Richards' parlors from
where the funeral will take place to
morrow (Thursday) afternoon at 2
o'clock, Rev. C. A. Cook officiating.
Interment in Mount Moriah cemetery
Motor funeral.
CARD OF THANKS.
I desire to express by heartfelt
lhanks to all kind neighbors and
friends w'ho showed mo so much sym
pathy and otherwise assisted me dur
ing the illness and at the funeral of
my beloved husband. I particularly
wish to thank the members of the
I.oyal Order of Moose and the Daugh
ters of St. George lodges, also those
w'ho setn the beautiful bowers.
MRS. JOSEPH FRRETHY.
JOSEPH RICHARDS,
Funeral Director! and Emba1m«ra
'Varrfngton Richard*. Pres, and Mgr
15-19 South Montana St.
Phona 397
SULLIVAN The funeral of the lut
Patrick Q. Sullivan will take place to
morrow (Thursday) morning at 'J
o'clock at the residence of his sister.
Mrs. Emmet Murphy, 119 West Wool
man street, proceeding to St. Mary's
church, where mass will be celebrated
at 9:30. Interment In the Catholic
cemetery.
LARRY DUGGAN
Reliable Undertaker and Fmkalasee
122 North Main Street
Bell Phone 77fe
MEIER—The remains of Joseph
Meier, who died this morning, aged 83
years, are at the Daniels & Bilboa un
dertaking parlors pending instructions
from a brother in Chicago. Funeral
announcement *wiil be made later.
DANIEL S & BILBOA
Undertakers and Embalmers
Automobile and Carriage Equipment
Phone 388 125 East Park Street
Residence Phone 5822-J
_ Office Always Open _
SHERMAN^& REED
Undertakers and Embalmers
Aatomeblls and Carriage Equipment
111-135 East Broadway
Phenes ST and II
M. J. WALSH CO.
Funeral Directors and Embalmers.
New Location 397-309 West Park Street.
Automobile Equipment. Phone 85.
SAM R. WHITE
WAR RELIEF FUND OF
$1,000,000 FOR ELKS
Boston, July 11.—A fund of $1,000,800
for war relief work was appropriated
by the Benevolent und Protective
Order of Elks late t« day.
Values You Cannot
Duplicate
Shop where you will, make the most rigid comparisons, you can
not duplicate the values represented in the listed items. We
repeat—you cannot afford to buy a single piece of furniture
without first getting our low prices and easy terms of payment.
$27.50 Oak Buffet $20.00
Buffet No. 1147, quartered oak in the
golden finish. Two small drawers,
one large one and double-door locker.
French bevel plate mirror over top.
Worth 127.50, for ...........$20.00
$27.50 Oak Buffet $20.00
Buffet No. 274 is a good model, built
of quartered oak, fumed finish. Fitted
with small cutlery drawers, large
linen drawer and l«»ckor. Mirror over
top. Worth $27.50, for ..... $20.00
\o
mm .s
$19.00 Extension Table $13.50
Extension table. No. 790, has round
top and square pedestal. Quartered
oak In the fumed finish. Measures
42 Inches closed and full six feet open.
Worth $19, for ..............$13.50
Order by Mail; We Prepay Freight
$20.00 Oak Dresser $11.00
Dresser No. 434 is a high dresser of quartered oak, golden finish. Adjust
able miiror of French bevel plate. Worth $20, for ................$1 1.00
$8.50 All-Gold Bed $5.00
Iron bed of high-grade metal, finished in tho all
gold-enamel finish. Vernis Martin style. Continuous
posts und cross rails, with uprights Joined by orna
mental chills. No. 762. Worth $8.50, for $5.00
$17.50 Brass Bed $12.50
Brass bed, satin finished by
guaranteed prove
is. Two-Inch
posts and
heavy f 1 1
lers. A g(M>d
id at
1 o w price.
No. 6 6 5 0.
Worth
$17.50, for
$12.50
$60.00 Kindel Bed $45.00 * $37.50 Sellers Kilcheneed $30
ellers Kitcheneed No.
•onvenient kitchen cabinet Fitted
vlth aluminum covered, extension
op. All the needed drawers, bins
j and boards arranged In most con
lven ~ ! veulent manner. Worth »37.S0, f,.r
$15® only ....................... $50.0»
Kind el parlor bed No. 216 has frame
of fumed oak, and Is upholstered in
Spanish muleskln. Fitted with good
separate mattress. Built in daven
port style. Worth $ 60 , foi
48 to M WEST PARK
A Big July
Clearance Sale
OF ALL SUMMER
MILLINERY
Hats worth up to $10 now
for ................SI.95
Hats worth up to $5.. 79C
Fisher's Millinery
Cor. Montana and Park Sts.
BABIES ARRIVE AT
HOMES OF BROTHERS
family's double victory.
PRINTING BUREAU
EMPLOYES WANT TO
GET OVERTIME P,
Washington, July 11.—A prot
printing . because It prev
from earning overtim« pay.
ITALIAN MISSION IS
BACK IN EUROPE
Bordeaux, July 11.—The Prince of
Udine, with the other members of the
Italian mission to the United States,
has arrived in France. The visit to
the United States has been an entire
success, he stated, adding: "1 am in a
hurry to resume command of my
troops, but I am glad to have been
entrusted with the mission of carry
ing to the American people the homage
of Italy as Marshal Joffre carried that
of France. Our unforgetable reception
from the United States is a symbol of
the resolution that un'tcs us all."
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VALUES |
IN
E=
=
GROCERIES i
=
TO BE
==
"REAL VALUES"
EE
must l>e more than low
=
priced—they must include
=
quality and purity.
EE
THE ECONOMY
EE
WHOLESALE GROCERY
offers you quality and
=
purity in groceries at the
=
strictly w holesale prices.
EE
Potatoes—Old or new;
=
dry and mealy, 100 opunds
=
for ............83.50
=
Starch,—Gloss or corn
=
starch; 4 packages. . 25C
Gloss starch, 5-pound box
EEE
for .............. 35«
8
MASON JARS
Best Make — Self-Sealing
=3
Pints, per dozen. 81.00
=
Quarts, per dozen 81.10

Rubbers for Mason jars,

three dozen ........25C
==
Salt— A 25-pound sack of
=
table salt for.......40C
Coffee,—Economy brand;
the best money can buy,
pound! ............ 35 <£
EE
Tea — Liptnn's Yellow
=
label, 90c tea, pound 75C
EE
=
9 PHONES, 1130
=
mjjZ
Ù and 1131
——
SS
Economy Wholesale
zz
Grocery Company
=
ll
604-606-608-610 Utah Ave.
=
^lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllrr
TO AMEND MIGRATORY
BIRD REGULATIONS
The Post's Washington Bureau.
Washington, D. C., July 11.—The
United States department of agricul
ture is amending the migratory regu
lations, so as to provide a closed sea
son for water fowl in Colorado. Mon
tana, Wyoming and other states from
Sept. 18 to Dec. 31.
SUBSCRIBE FOR THE POST

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